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Olympus E-30 An Olympus 12.1MP upper mid-range DSLR, the E-30.

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Old 2nd December 2009
Ellie Ellie is offline
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Purple bits on a pink cyclamen

Umm, I really don't know what's happened here.

These pictures were taken indoors and in fairly good light - in a conservatory (not ours, we haven't got one)

The flowers were all pure pink, there was no trace of purple on the petals. I've taken pictures of all sorts of flowers before, mainly with my E-400, but have never had anything like this happen.

Some of the ones I took came out fine, but these are an absolute disaster.

I'll try to upload clickable thumbnails rather than boring everybody with a load of full size pictures.

Please don't ask me for RAW files, I haven't got any because I don't use RAW. I didn't need to with my E-400 and I don't think I should have to with the E-30.

All I've done with these samples is reduce the size and slightly sharpen them, to focus for upload.

I have tried sorting them out using Gimp but I honestly don't know what to do, and I don't understand what's happened. I've never had purple bits like this in pictures before.

There are a load more of examples in my gallery.

. . . . .

I've realised that the thumbnails strip out the EXIF, the information should be intact in the larger images.
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Old 2nd December 2009
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Re: Purple bits on a pink cyclamen

This may be totally irrelevant to digital photos, but I remember from my film days that bluebells always came out purplish because of the ultraviolet light they reflected not being picked up by the film (or maybe it was the other way round?) so you needed a special filter to render the colour properly. Perhaps something similar here?
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Old 2nd December 2009
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Re: Purple bits on a pink cyclamen

I suppose the simple answer might be white balance?? If there is very little true white in the shot, then I imagine Auto white balance has problems guessing the right setting.

If this was the E30, then it should use the ambient light sensor to get WB correct - however I wonder if that can be fooled as well: Maybe the daylight in the conservatory was a strange colour for some reason. (This would also apply if you used a fixed setting such as daylight). A purist approach would be to take a picture of a white card during the same session and use that as the reference for all the subsequent photos.

This is one of the reasons I use raw files. I accept that I have to "develop" each picture individually, just like the old days. Part of that developing process is fine adjustment of exposure and sorting out the white balance.

Equally - it could be the case that these flowers are just so saturated that they go off the end of the sensors ability to cope...

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Old 2nd December 2009
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Re: Purple bits on a pink cyclamen

Ellie I presume you are talking about the dark purple/blue bits on some of the edges of some of the leaves and not the overall colour of the flowers as Pete and meach think you are?

If so ,then yes a agree its strange, its not consistant enough to be purple/blue fringing as that would on all the highlight edges.

Are you sure that these leaf edges were not damaged and you did not not notice when photographing them?

If not then I am at a loss.
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Old 2nd December 2009
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Re: Purple bits on a pink cyclamen

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_S View Post

Are you sure that these leaf edges were not damaged and you did not not notice when photographing them?

If not then I am at a loss.
Ellie,
I've got to agree with Paul I think it's damage on the edges as the below over sharpened image shows.



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Old 2nd December 2009
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Re: Purple bits on a pink cyclamen

Flower colours can exceed the gamut of the sensor, resulting in unexpected hues. The classic example is bluebells, and it affects both film and digital sensors. I'm not sure if this explains Ellie's problem here or no, though.

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Old 2nd December 2009
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Re: Purple bits on a pink cyclamen

I do think it would be worth Ellie's while to go back and take a close look at these petals with the aid of a magnifying glass.
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Old 9th December 2009
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Re: Purple bits on a pink cyclamen

Thanks for all the replies.

Sorry, I should have said that I noticed these purple areas when I was previewing the images. I did take a closer look at the plant but there wasn't anything purple on it at all. It's a very common, very ordinary, normal sized, pink cyclamen. The pictures were taken using the 35mm macro lens.

Quote:
Originally Posted by snaarman View Post
This is one of the reasons I use raw files.
Err, well, I use jepgs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by snaarman View Post
I suppose the simple answer might be white balance?? If there is very little true white in the shot, then I imagine Auto white balance has problems guessing the right setting.

Maybe the daylight in the conservatory was a strange colour for some reason.
Hmm. I did run them through Gimp but couldn't find a way of fixing (getting rid of) the purple.

If there were purple areas on all the pictures that were taken I'd say it was because of odd light or something, but it was only some of them.

The conservatory is clear thick glass, including the roof, and it had recently been cleaned. So the glass was/is clean and clear. It was afternoon, nowhere near getting dark though, there were no lights on. I can't think of anything that would have 'coloured' the light in some way, and how it would have affected only some of the pictures.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_S View Post
If so ,then yes a agree its strange, its not consistant enough to be purple/blue fringing as that would on all the highlight edges
That's what's got me confused. If it were "purple fringing" I'd have thought it would be on all the pictures I took, but it isn't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gno View Post
Ellie,
I've got to agree with Paul I think it's damage on the edges as the below over sharpened image shows.

and
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adagio View Post
I do think it would be worth Ellie's while to go back and take a close look at these petals with the aid of a magnifying glass.
If it was me, looking at these pictures taken by somebody else, I'd probably have said the same.

The thing is that I noticed the purple in the image reviews, and did look very carefully at the plant (although not with a magnifying glass) there was no purple on any of the flowers.

That damaged bit of petal was papery thin, almost white, almost see-through. The vertical veins had, if anything, a slight brownish tint - absolutely no purple, honestly there wasn't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by meach View Post
This may be totally irrelevant to digital photos, but I remember from my film days that bluebells always came out purplish because of the ultraviolet light they reflected not being picked up by the film (or maybe it was the other way round?) so you needed a special filter to render the colour properly. Perhaps something similar here?
and
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian View Post
Flower colours can exceed the gamut of the sensor, resulting in unexpected hues. The classic example is bluebells, and it affects both film and digital sensors. I'm not sure if this explains Ellie's problem here or no, though. Ian
I can't say how this camera behaves with bluebells, because I haven't had it long enough.

I don't know if any people whose cameras have the same sensor have noticed anything about how it deals with blues and purples.

In the past, with the E-400, I've had trouble getting the right colour for some dark purple/blueish clematis, cranesbill/geranium and aquilegia. Bluebells seem to vary in colour with the time of day, the angle of natural light and so on, but pink flowers have always come out true.

These purple lines/marks were on only some of the pictures I took, so whatever is/was causing it isn't consistent.

I don't mind if somebody says it's caused by physics and electronics, or if it's related to the angle the light falls on the flower in relation to the angle of the lens, or if somehow the edge of the petals is acting as a prism and splitting light in a peculiar way.

I haven't a clue how to either fix it or make sure it doesn't happen again.
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Old 10th December 2009
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Re: Purple bits on a pink cyclamen

Ellie, I'd just put it down to a one off unless it happens a lot.

Have to say Ellie I have not noticed a problem with the E-30 and purples.

Purple sweet peas and E-30.

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Old 10th December 2009
Ellie Ellie is offline
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Re: Purple bits on a pink cyclamen

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_S View Post
Ellie, I'd just put it down to a one off unless it happens a lot.
Yes, but ...

I suppose it's the 'confidence' thing, now it's happened I want to be sure it doesn't happen again, or know what I can do to make sure it doesn't happen again.

Even though I can't easily go back and take pictures of this particular plant I know that cyclamens are two a penny at this time of year, so I could easily go and buy one if I felt like it.

One of the reasons for 'needing' the articulating screen, and buying the E-30 when I could, is that I've been trying for absolutely ages to get decent pictures of some absolutely tiny wild orchids, they're so low to the ground that it's impossible to get your eye to the viewfinder to get a sideways view of them. Getting to where they grow means making a deliberate journey, so it isn't something I'd do very often and timing is important too - otherwise they're out of flower.

Problem is that these little flowers are pink.

I don't know what made these purple splodges appear - whether it my camera, the angle of the light, that particular plant or shade of pink - and I don't know how to find out either, and I'd feel rather silly taking it into a shop if these purple bits are "normal".
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