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The lounge Relax, take a break from photo and camera talk - have a chat about something else for a change. Just keep it clean and polite!

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  #1  
Old 19th July 2011
jamie allan jamie allan is offline
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Home WiFi Security

I came across this article in PC Pro which certainly gives food for thought.
http://www.itpro.co.uk/blogs/2011/07...-wep-is-pants/

The thing is it's not just WEP encryption that can be hacked - WPA-PSK (which is the standard for most network provided routers) can also be hacked though it does take much longer. It also makes you wonder about signing up to the likes of BT FON as the standard BT HomeHub only offers WEP or WPA-PSK encryption.
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Old 20th July 2011
Ulfric M Douglas Ulfric M Douglas is offline
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Re: Home WiFi Security

I ain't got no stinkin' wi-fi!

Actually, I just feel wiring thing up to other things provides a more stable connection. The proof is in the pudding.
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Old 20th July 2011
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Re: Home WiFi Security

Just about any security can be hacked, given the right tools, talents and circumstances. Ask any newspaper owner! All you can do is try to make it difficult!
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Old 20th July 2011
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Re: Home WiFi Security

Yes, we are all wired here for speed and security. I do have a wireless access point on the network we use on odd occasions. It's so weedy you can only just get it downstairs, there's no way it would get as far as the road
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Old 20th July 2011
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Re: Home WiFi Security

Hi,

First of all I don't agree that WiFi "stinks".

There are four levels of securities defined by the WiFi Alliance
  • (None) An open wireless network is as the name suggests open and the data traffic sent over WLAN to/from your computer is not encrypted. Bear this in mind if you for instance use your laptop at open access points and browse using http.
  • WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy, defined in 1999). WEP has a relatively poor encryption security level. With the right tools in the right hands WEP can be cracked in seconds.
  • WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access, 2003 I believe). WAP has a much stronger 128 bit encryption level. WAP can be cracked too but it will take longer, we are talking minutes. I have seen articles where it is claimed it can be cracked in 6 minutes.
  • WPA2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access, 2006) Based on WPA but using a much stronger encryption algorithm. This is the security level recommended to use per today. WPA2 certification is mandatory for all new devices to bear the Wi-Fi trademark

Precaution measures one should take to keep intruders at distance from hacking into your home network:

1. Make sure the router supports WPA at minimum, recommended is WPA2. Get a modern router if your router is old.
2. WPA is particularly susceptible to so called "dictionary attacks" against weak passphrases. To make it difficult - use a strong passphrase (long, mixing uppercase, lowercase, digits and other characters). Best is to generate a long random passphrase, enter it into the router, computer(s)/mobile phone(s)/other devices, write it on a piece of paper and store it on a not so obvious place.

/Tord
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Old 20th July 2011
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Re: Home WiFi Security

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tordan58 View Post
Hi,

First of all I don't agree that WiFi "stinks".

There are four levels of securities defined by the WiFi Alliance
  • (None) An open wireless network is as the name suggests open and the data traffic sent over WLAN to/from your computer is not encrypted. Bear this in mind if you for instance use your laptop at open access points and browse using http.
  • WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy, defined in 1999). WEP has a relatively poor encryption security level. With the right tools in the right hands WEP can be cracked in seconds.
  • WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access, 2003 I believe). WAP has a much stronger 128 bit encryption level. WAP can be cracked too but it will take longer, we are talking minutes. I have seen articles where it is claimed it can be cracked in 6 minutes.
  • WPA2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access, 2006) Based on WPA but using a much stronger encryption algorithm. This is the security level recommended to use per today. WPA2 certification is mandatory for all new devices to bear the Wi-Fi trademark

Precaution measures one should take to keep intruders at distance from hacking into your home network:

1. Make sure the router supports WPA at minimum, recommended is WPA2. Get a modern router if your router is old.
2. WPA is particularly susceptible to so called "dictionary attacks" against weak passphrases. To make it difficult - use a strong passphrase (long, mixing uppercase, lowercase, digits and other characters). Best is to generate a long random passphrase, enter it into the router, computer(s)/mobile phone(s)/other devices, write it on a piece of paper and store it on a not so obvious place.

/Tord
Good advice Tord, exactly what I use and practice
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Old 20th July 2011
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Re: Home WiFi Security

There is one other very important level of security. Most modern wireless routers support MAC filtering, you can restrict access to the wireless network to allow only specific PCs based on their MAC addresses.

Read your manuals - certainly for Netgear and 2Wire routers it is very easy.
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Old 20th July 2011
Jim Ford Jim Ford is offline
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Re: Home WiFi Security

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Originally Posted by Adagio View Post
There is one other very important level of security. Most modern wireless routers support MAC filtering, you can restrict access to the wireless network to allow only specific PCs based on their MAC addresses.
ISTRC that MAC addresses can be forged. Is that correct?

I've set up a home security camera system which I can access wirelessly. I've set it so that the server only accepts connections from a specific MAC address.

Jim
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Old 20th July 2011
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Re: Home WiFi Security

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Originally Posted by Jim Ford View Post
ISTRC that MAC addresses can be forged. Is that correct?
Jim
That may well be the case but how could you determine what to forge it to?
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Old 20th July 2011
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Re: Home WiFi Security

Probably, but a forger would have to know what MAC address to set a rogue device to.

Best to do what I do - live in the country with no near neighbours and no roads passing the house

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Ford View Post
ISTRC that MAC addresses can be forged. Is that correct?

Jim
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Old 20th July 2011
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Re: Home WiFi Security

I suppose a sentence from Jabberwocky needs little change to be a secure WPA2 passphrase
Particularly if you start and end mid-sentence.
Plus not publishing the SSID and then setting security to partition the Wireless from the wired LAN in the router.
MAC filtering is a crude protection and you're right an intruder can copy your MAC address, but first they have to decrypt the valid traffic from your wireless connection to get your MAC address.
If they've got that far you're probably compromised anyhow.

Worst offence is probably to leave your router password unchanged from the manufacturer's default, and then permit administration of the router from the wireless side as well as the wired network.
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