Olympus UK E-System User Group
Olympus UK E-System User Group

Join our unique resource for Olympus Four Thirds E-System DSLR and Pen and OM-D Micro Four Thirds photographers. Show your images via our free e-group photo gallery. Please read the e-group.uk.net forum terms and conditions before posting for the first time. Above all, welcome!


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Looking for improvement This is the e-group critique board. If you post a picture here it will be assumed that you are looking for comprehensive technical feedback - both good and bad, but always respectful. Only post pictures here if you can deal with potentially negative constructive criticism. Anyone is qualified to comment and post feedback, and everyone is encouraged to do so. NB: "Looking for Improvement" is the place to post any pictures you would like advice on improving, no matter how bad you might think they are.

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  #16  
Old 20th December 2010
maccabeej maccabeej is offline
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Re: A tearful ( plus rain,sleet and snow! ) farewell to a retiring aeroplane

Recently travelled in one from Quito to the Galapagos, the interior was a bit dowdy but still a comfy flight considering the 9000ft departure airport down to sea level then out to the islands.

Interiors you can do something about as KLM proved on the L1011 we flew back from Quito to Amsterdam.

Lovely shot of an aircraft I saw on its first visit to Farnborough in Boeing livery.
Jim
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  #17  
Old 20th December 2010
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Re: A tearful ( plus rain,sleet and snow! ) farewell to a retiring aeroplane

Number 1 and the last 2 for me. I really really like the 2nd last one with the light trails, its superb!

I love Aeroplane stuff, I'm also a avid reader of the pprune forum. I always wanted to be a pilot, perhaps If I'd stuck in at school and was a bit more intellectual

Can I ask a technical question? How is the plane powered? I'm guessing APU as there is no electrical cart? Do the engine fan blades turn when the APU is running? I'm guessing the blades are spinning in the photos?

Thanks for showing us these shots
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  #18  
Old 20th December 2010
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Re: A tearful ( plus rain,sleet and snow! ) farewell to a retiring aeroplane

Dear Jim,

Now that sounds like a real flight, what a great sector to end up in Galapagos. Hopefully you had your camera with you, I place I would love to go. Such a shame the interior was a bit tatty. I always thought that the nose of the Tristar looked like a dolphin, perhaps I should stay off the beer.

Cheers

Chris
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  #19  
Old 20th December 2010
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Re: A tearful ( plus rain,sleet and snow! ) farewell to a retiring aeroplane

Dear Garrie,

Thanks for very kind comments, you are more than welcome to ask some questions. Pprune certainly is mine of information which can make a day evaporate before you know it.

The 757 was powered from its APU that is tucked away in the tail cone. The engineers were very kind to do that instead of using external power. Due to the strong wind you are spot on that the engine fan blades were turning as a result of the wind. The Rolls Royce RB211 is unique in that it has 3 independent fan rotors. It may surprise you that the large blades on the front rotor of the engine will turn even in light wind, windmilling as it is known.

As each individual fan blade of the rotor is mounted in a slot. there is a little free play as a result they make a clattering noise as they slowly rotate. It really can be quite loud. This is why during periods of longer storage the engines are covered at both ends to stop them rotating and prevent any rubbish getting in the engine.

So to answer you question, the engines are not turning because the APU is running, just the wind does that. However to start the engines it is normal practise to use high pressure bleed air from the APU which is fed to the engine being started to crank over the engine during the start sequence. It may surprise you that the smallest of the 3 rotors is cranked during the start sequence that in turn will cause the other two rotors to turn. If the APU is not available for use, the air supply to start the engine will come from a high pressure ground air start cart. On the 757 a minimum of two ground air carts are needed to start an engine such is the volume of air that is needed.

Sorry Garrie I seem to have gone on a bit!

Cheers

Chris
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  #20  
Old 20th December 2010
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Re: A tearful ( plus rain,sleet and snow! ) farewell to a retiring aeroplane

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainD View Post
Dear Garrie,

Thanks for very kind comments, you are more than welcome to ask some questions. Pprune certainly is mine of information which can make a day evaporate before you know it.

The 757 was powered from its APU that is tucked away in the tail cone. The engineers were very kind to do that instead of using external power. Due to the strong wind you are spot on that the engine fan blades were turning as a result of the wind. The Rolls Royce RB211 is unique in that it has 3 independent fan rotors. It may surprise you that the large blades on the front rotor of the engine will turn even in light wind, windmilling as it is known.

As each individual fan blade of the rotor is mounted in a slot. there is a little free play as a result they make a clattering noise as they slowly rotate. It really can be quite loud. This is why during periods of longer storage the engines are covered at both ends to stop them rotating and prevent any rubbish getting in the engine.

So to answer you question, the engines are not turning because the APU is running, just the wind does that. However to start the engines it is normal practise to use high pressure bleed air from the APU which is fed to the engine being started to crank over the engine during the start sequence. It may surprise you that the smallest of the 3 rotors is cranked during the start sequence that in turn will cause the other two rotors to turn. If the APU is not available for use, the air supply to start the engine will come from a high pressure ground air start cart. On the 757 a minimum of two ground air carts are needed to start an engine such is the volume of air that is needed.

Sorry Garrie I seem to have gone on a bit!

Cheers

Chris
Thanks for the reply and no no please don't be sorry, I love this kinda stuff. Its great to have someone explain it. I'd make even the most laid back pilot loose his patience talking about planes and the like, I find it so fascinating. I dread to think how many work hours I've lost reading pprune lol.

I had no idea the fan blades would turn in just wind and I'm weird in that I love the clattering sound they make.

Thanks again for replying. I'm off to look at youtube for APU start videos and jet engines (yes I am that sad, I've spent hours watching cross wind landings on youtube. I don't own any FS software though )
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  #21  
Old 20th December 2010
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Re: A tearful ( plus rain,sleet and snow! ) farewell to a retiring aeroplane

Dear Garrie,

If you want a great book to read about jet engines,Rolls Royce publish a book called "The Jet engine" which is wonderful.

Cheers

Chris
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  #22  
Old 20th December 2010
MartinF MartinF is offline
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Re: A tearful ( plus rain,sleet and snow! ) farewell to a retiring aeroplane

You made great use of your privileged position - the shots are all superb, though I agree with everyone else that the one with the lights on and the floodlights off is so atmospheric. So many people ignore workhorse aircraft like the 757 in favour of the glamour of military aircraft - like people going for sports cars rather than vans - yet they do such fantastic service over the years and build their own character, and your pictures reflect that well. I do hope that eventually one gets saved - though I know from bitter experience that preserving buses is bad enough, large aircraft and commercial shipping must present nightmares!

Thanks for the pictures and the story too.
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