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  #1  
Old 25th February 2012
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Lightbulb Photographing Airplanes.

Photographing airplanes, how difficult can it be?
Well judging by the photos here in the galleries, it is difficult for most of us. Unless your an aircraft spotter/ airplane photographer. Someone like me. Photographing airplanes is a complete different ballgame.

Lets take for instance the ISO settings.
Most of us would say a plane is a fast moving object, so the rule in photographing is that you should use fast film. This means that the ISO setting should be at least ISO 200 or higher to freeze the plane's motion. This is wrong according to the spotting photographers. You would use ISO 100 or slower to get sharper images and less grain.
To "freeze" the plane's motion, you will use your settings.

First, let's look at the Aperture settings.
Most of us will use a telezoom lens with a range of 40-150 mm, 50-200mm or 70-300mm. Most in use will be, I guess, the 40-150mm 1:4-5.6 and the 70-300mm 1:4-5.6. So the most used Aperture setting, at least under most weather conditions as a shoot to go setting, would be F6.3. Most used Aperture setting will be, I guess, F8. Depending on the weather conditions your shutter speeds will range somewhere between 1/250 to 1/2000 sec. Also you will use as metering device the spot metering option or center metering option to make sure that you measure the light the reflects from the plane.
Then you will set your White Balance to auto. You might want to set your photomodus to vivid.

Second, if you want to use Manual setting.
If you use Manual setting, you have to remind yourself that you have to adjust constantly your shutter speeds and aperture settings to the changing light. So if you have set your camera, for instance, at F7.1 with a shutter speed of 1/350 sec. It is possible that 30 minutes you want to need 1/350 sec at F6.3 or F7.1 at 1/125 sec. So, if you would want to use Shutter speed as main setting only, you need only have to set the S(hutter) mode and set it to the desired speed. Just like you would do with your A(perture) mode.

Another important thing in airplane photographing is panning.
At least in ground to air photographing it is very important to track the plane with your camera (pan). This way you freeze the plane's motion and in most cases the background will be blurred which suggested motion. Especially with slow(wer) shutter speeds or in low light. Also important is to keep your Image Stabilization (IS) off IS will try to compensate the panning and this results also in a blurry photo

One of the most common practices in the aviation spotting community is the way of framing. (see example below)


Reason for this way of framing is that often you will be standing near an airport. In most cases it is forbidden to make photos of the infrastructure of the airport. So you want to try to leave out as much as possible of the infrastructure as possible. A second reason is that you want only the airplane in your photo. Exception of this rule is of course when you are at an airshow and you are making photos of demonstration teams and when planes use smoke.

Best thing is, just go out to your local airfield and practice, practice, practice.
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Oly OMD E-M 10 Mark II
Oly E-420
Oly Zuiko ED 70-300mm 1:4-5.6
Oly Zuiko ED 40-150mm 1:4-5.6
Oly Zuiko ED 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6
Samyang/Delamax 650-1300mm 1:8-16 Manual Telephoto Lens
Chinon 500mm mirror 1:8-16 Manual Telephoto Lens

https://adewit7.wixsite.com/aviationphotography
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  #2  
Old 26th February 2012
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Re: Photographing Airplanes.

I've always considered the Hunter to be one of the most elegant aircraft designs ever.
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  #3  
Old 26th February 2012
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Re: Photographing Airplanes.

Nice.

Now the aircraft that I take pictures of tend to be a lot smaller and slower.



Tibenham 30-09-2011 Sunset (2) by Kevin Fairgrieve, on Flickr


Tibenham 30-09-2011 Tiger Moth (6) by Kevin Fairgrieve, on Flickr

I do sometimes do the odd air show though.


Dakota (DC3) Duxford Flying Legends 2011 (12) by Kevin Fairgrieve, on Flickr


Sally B Flying Legends 2011 (2) by Kevin Fairgrieve, on Flickr
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Old 27th February 2012
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Re: Photographing Airplanes.

Cracking shots NSS, lovely and sharp. Wish I could manage that!
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  #5  
Old 16th March 2012
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Re: Photographing Airplanes.

DanH56,

If you read the tutorial about photographing airplanes and follow the tips I've given there, I'm sure you'll manage. It's just a matter of going out to a nearby airfield and practice. You still have a few months till the show season starts. Also the weather is getting better day by day. So go out and give it a try.
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Oly OMD E-M 10 Mark II
Oly E-420
Oly Zuiko ED 70-300mm 1:4-5.6
Oly Zuiko ED 40-150mm 1:4-5.6
Oly Zuiko ED 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6
Samyang/Delamax 650-1300mm 1:8-16 Manual Telephoto Lens
Chinon 500mm mirror 1:8-16 Manual Telephoto Lens

https://adewit7.wixsite.com/aviationphotography
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  #6  
Old 10th June 2013
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Re: Photographing Airplanes.

Photographing airplanes, how difficult can it be?
Well judging by the photos here in the galleries, it is difficult for most of us. Unless your an aircraft spotter/ airplane photographer. Someone like me. Photographing airplanes is a complete different ballgame.

Lets take for instance the ISO settings.
Most of us would say a plane is a fast moving object, so the rule in photographing is that you should use fast film. This means that the ISO setting should be at least ISO 200 or higher to freeze the plane's motion. This is wrong according to the spotting photographers. You would use ISO 100 or slower to get sharper images and less grain.
To "freeze" the plane's motion, you will use your settings.

First, let's look at the Aperture settings.
Most of us will use a telezoom lens with a range of 40-150 mm, 50-200mm or 70-300mm. Most in use will be, I guess, the 40-150mm 1:4-5.6 and the 70-300mm 1:4-5.6. So the most used Aperture setting, at least under most weather conditions as a shoot to go setting, would be F6.3. Most used Aperture setting will be, I guess, F8. Depending on the weather conditions your shutter speeds will range somewhere between 1/250 to 1/2000 sec. Also you will use as metering device the spot metering option or center metering option to make sure that you measure the light the reflects from the plane.
Then you will set your White Balance to auto. You might want to set your photomodus to vivid.

Second, if you want to use Manual setting.
If you use Manual setting, you have to remind yourself that you have to adjust constantly your shutter speeds and aperture settings to the changing light. So if you have set your camera, for instance, at F7.1 with a shutter speed of 1/350 sec. It is possible that 30 minutes you want to need 1/350 sec at F6.3 or F7.1 at 1/125 sec. So, if you would want to use Shutter speed as main setting only, you need only have to set the S(hutter) mode and set it to the desired speed. Just like you would do with your A(perture) mode.

Another important thing in airplane photographing is panning.
At least in ground to air photographing it is very important to track the plane with your camera (pan). This way you freeze the plane's motion and in most cases the background will be blurred which suggested motion. Especially with slow(wer) shutter speeds or in low light. Also important is to keep your Image Stabilization (IS) off IS will try to compensate the panning and this results also in a blurry photo

One of the most common practices in the aviation spotting community is the way of framing. (see example below)




Reason for this way of framing is that often you will be standing near an airport. In most cases it is forbidden to make photos of the infrastructure of the airport. So you want to try to leave out as much as possible of the infrastructure as possible. A second reason is that you want only the airplane in your photo. Exception of this rule is of course when you are at an airshow and you are making photos of demonstration teams and when planes use smoke.

Best thing is, just go out to your local airfield and practice, practice, practice.
__________________
André de Wit
The Netherlands



Oly OMD E-M 10 Mark II
Oly E-420
Oly Zuiko ED 70-300mm 1:4-5.6
Oly Zuiko ED 40-150mm 1:4-5.6
Oly Zuiko ED 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6
Samyang/Delamax 650-1300mm 1:8-16 Manual Telephoto Lens
Chinon 500mm mirror 1:8-16 Manual Telephoto Lens

https://adewit7.wixsite.com/aviationphotography
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  #7  
Old 27th June 2013
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Re: Photographing Airplanes.

Many thanks for the advice. I'm looking at going to the UK Air Tattoo this year, think i might visit the local air strip to "get my eye in"
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  #8  
Old 28th June 2013
IamFisheye IamFisheye is offline
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Re: Photographing Airplanes.

This might be an interesting event for anyone into planes and living near Stow Maries in Essex (I nearly bought a house a mile up the road in Cock Clarkes a few years back).

http://www.andyrouse.co.uk/?page_id=157

It's not really my thing (I will be in Africa shooting my thing on the day in question anyway). But at £42 a head it looks like good value for money.

PS I have nothing to do with the airfield or Mr Rouse (I just like his work).
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  #9  
Old 28th June 2013
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Re: Photographing Airplanes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IamFisheye View Post
This might be an interesting event for anyone into planes and living near Stow Maries in Essex (I nearly bought a house a mile up the road in Cock Clarkes a few years back).

http://www.andyrouse.co.uk/?page_id=157

It's not really my thing (I will be in Africa shooting my thing on the day in question anyway). But at £42 a head it looks like good value for money.

PS I have nothing to do with the airfield or Mr Rouse (I just like his work).
Damn, I'm working on 29th and even if I wasn't I spent all my money in London last weekend. That's a shame because Stow Maries isn't that far from me and it looks like being a fun event. I'll keep an eye open in case they repeat this.
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