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Olympus E-620/600 An Olympus 12.1MP mid-range compact DSLR, the E-620 and the feature-reduiced version, the E-600.

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  #16  
Old 13th January 2011
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Phaedrus Phaedrus is offline
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Re: focusing indoors question

This strobing flash drives me (and any subjects, human or rabbit) nuts. My E-410 does exactly the same thing, but as said, the AF Illuminate Assist can be disabled via the menus.

Turning off the flash and increasing the ISO to 800 or even 1600 has helped for snaps, but obviously noise prevents any enlargement or publication.

Note that thus far, I've typically left the camera in "P" mode for pretty much all situations, except for using "SPORT" for my son's football matches.

Two things bother me about all this:

1. I don't see other DSLRs doing this, and I know two guys with Canons (350D & 450D) who say it doesn't happen to them - how do Canons & Nikons AF in low light?

2. Those who like to gloat & mock love to see you struggle with your big, flashy "look at me, don't I look like a pro" DSLR, while they happily snap away with their compacts that they got for a fraction of the price of your camera that's supposed to be SO much better . . .


Mark
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  #17  
Old 13th January 2011
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Re: focusing indoors question

Hi Mark, I do simpathise with you, I know its quite difficlut to focus in low light with any camera no matter how expensive it is, wether nikon canon or olympus the secret is really using a fast lens f2.8 or faster, prefocus manually. These are not cheap probably the cheapest is sigma 30mm 1.4 which is really bright which helps with the focus.

but if you are looking at a long lens then you are looking at £1500 for the 35 to 100 f2 to 90 to 250mm f2.8 lens at a whopping £4,000 there are the sigma 150mm f2,8 macro lens which you would need to prefocus to something in the distance that you want to capture the object in as these are macro type lenses and slow to auto focus as they are very fine adjustments, and these come out at something like £600 unless you are luky enough to get a second hand one.



Dave
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Old 14th January 2011
photo_owl photo_owl is offline
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Re: focusing indoors question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daveart View Post
Hi Mark, I do simpathise with you, I know its quite difficlut to focus in low light with any camera no matter how expensive it is, wether nikon canon or olympus the secret is really using a fast lens f2.8 or faster, prefocus manually. These are not cheap probably the cheapest is sigma 30mm 1.4 which is really bright which helps with the focus.

but if you are looking at a long lens then you are looking at £1500 for the 35 to 100 f2 to 90 to 250mm f2.8 lens at a whopping £4,000 there are the sigma 150mm f2,8 macro lens which you would need to prefocus to something in the distance that you want to capture the object in as these are macro type lenses and slow to auto focus as they are very fine adjustments, and these come out at something like £600 unless you are luky enough to get a second hand one.



Dave
I have most of the lenses you reference and would, tactfully, suggest that they make no practical difference in terms of AF performance in the type of situations discussed in this thread.

The nature of the AF target, it's contrast and definition, relation to the AF point size and the AF settings being used are all important factors 'on the night'.

I'm not suggesting that they would never make any difference - just that when you are in difficult marginal indoor situations switching from (for example) the 12-60 at 60mm/4 to the 35/100 60mm/2 won't make a noticeable difference. Equally 12-60 30mm/3.3 to 30/1.4
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  #19  
Old 14th January 2011
Daveart Daveart is offline
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Re: focusing indoors question

Hi of cause it will make a diiference in being able to focus, its the amount of light that can reach the af sensor, if you are using a kit lens which has f3.5 at its widest f stop it will let in almost 1 stop less light than a lens that is f2 and 2 stops less light that an f1.4, so there for an f1.4 lens would achieve af focus more rederly than the f3.5 lens. to prove this put your 35 100mm f2 lens on set lens appiture to f3,5 press and hold then stop down button and focus at a low light situation and see how hard it is to focus as apossed to focusing with the lens open as normal.

Thats why pro photographer use fast lenses alot to ensure focus lock quickly and accuratly.

Dave
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Old 14th January 2011
photo_owl photo_owl is offline
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Re: focusing indoors question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daveart View Post
Hi of cause it will make a diiference in being able to focus, its the amount of light that can reach the af sensor, if you are using a kit lens which has f3.5 at its widest f stop it will let in almost 1 stop less light than a lens that is f2 and 2 stops less light that an f1.4, so there for an f1.4 lens would achieve af focus more rederly than the f3.5 lens. to prove this put your 35 100mm f2 lens on set lens appiture to f3,5 press and hold then stop down button and focus at a low light situation and see how hard it is to focus as apossed to focusing with the lens open as normal.

Thats why pro photographer use fast lenses alot to ensure focus lock quickly and accuratly.

Dave
Well, as I do it all the time there's no reason for such a meaningless test.

From your personal experience which 43 lens of yours is best at AF in such conditions, which body and which AF mode?
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