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Foto Fair Post your photos for friendly, non-critical feedback. This is the place to show pictures if you aren't yet ready for full-blooded critique, or simply want to share an interesting picture with other e-group visitors.

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  #1  
Old 29th September 2013
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The first rule of wildlife photography...

.... focus on the eyes.


Not so easy with snails.








Not particularly sharp as they were hand held and the thing was moving pretty quickly considering it was a snail and it doesn't take for the FOV to wobble one way or the other when the DOF is so thin.

On another note do these look a tad dark to anyone? My personal taste, for the majority of my images, is to have the histogram a little dark of centre as I find it tends to make the colours more colourful. Particularly on my ropey old laptop screen. Should I be exposing this way or should I be keeping it to the centre?

Will
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Old 29th September 2013
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Re: The first rule of wildlife photography...

boy these things are so fast and panning is difficult, I tend to shoot to the right but as you say the colours can give more punch if shot to the left.
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Old 29th September 2013
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Re: The first rule of wildlife photography...

Keep at it.
Its very difficult whatever the subject.
What lens are you using.
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Old 30th September 2013
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Re: The first rule of wildlife photography...

I've tried to focus on the eyes of snails too. So hard, I had to switch to manual focus, but they still move those eyes around too much!
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Old 30th September 2013
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Re: The first rule of wildlife photography...

Typical CD-AF talk here. "Couldn't track a snail!" Oh for the E-M1!
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Old 30th September 2013
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Re: The first rule of wildlife photography...

I used to grow Giant African Landsnails (Achatina and Archachatina sp.; and before going digital) for years and their eyes were like on telephone-poles - spanning the whole lenghts of your Helix aspersa - but I know what the difficulties are

Do you only take JPG's? If you also take Raw, then I would advise exposing more to the right, as you can make more use of your sensors dynamic range. Colour saturation can easily be adjusted later as well. Or use 'Vivid' mode if you don't want to post process. These are just a tiny bit to dark on my monitor.
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Old 1st October 2013
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Re: The first rule of wildlife photography...

These pictures are not under-exposed as such because although exposure is biased to the left of the histogram there is very little shadow clipping, but by not using the full range of the right-hand side of the histogram there is a loss, or suppression of, contrast. With your first picture, clicking "Auto Contrast" in Elements has virtually the same effect as moving the right slider in Levels inwards to meet the edge of the histogram. The result is a much more vibrant, punchy image and I suspect that the same would apply to your other pictures in this thread, but of course that may not be what you want.
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Old 3rd October 2013
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Re: The first rule of wildlife photography...

Thank you all for your comments and advice.

Alf, I was using an OM 50mm f1.8 with what looks like 48mm or 56mm of extension tube. I can't remember the aperture but it was a sunny day so may not have been wide open.

I only shoot JPEG at them moment as I don't have the gear or the time to process RAW. I have recently started to make tentative steps in PP. Purely limited to adjusting brightness, contrast and a few other sliders in Viewer 2. But even these limited steps have shown me how much can be rescued from a dull image that I may normally have deleted.

Does exposing to the right and then bringing it back work for JPEG as well as RAW?

Will
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Old 3rd October 2013
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Re: The first rule of wildlife photography...

Thank you all for your comments and advice.

Alf, I was using an OM 50mm f1.8 with what looks like 48mm or 56mm of extension tube. I can't remember the aperture but it was a sunny day so may not have been wide open.

I only shoot JPEG at them moment as I don't have the gear or the time to process RAW. I have recently started to make tentative steps in PP. Purely limited to adjusting brightness, contrast and a few other sliders in Viewer 2. But even these limited steps have shown me how much can be rescued from a dull image that I may normally have deleted.

Does exposing to the right and then bringing it back work for JPEG as well as RAW?

Will
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  #10  
Old 3rd October 2013
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Re: The first rule of wildlife photography...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Willom View Post

Does exposing to the right and then bringing it back work for JPEG as well as RAW?

Will
It does to an extent, but there is considerably less latitude than with raw and it is vital not to clip the histogram on the right. The sort of situation where it would work is in low contrast, poor light with a narrow range of tones producing a bunched histogram in the centre of the graph with unused latitude to left and right. Shifting the exposure, say, 0.7 stops to the right will still preserve highlight detail whilst providing more detail in the shadows with much less noise than if the shadows were lifted in pp. If the overall brightness of the image is a little too much it can be brought down in pp, suppressing noise rather than increasing it.

It would not work as well as raw in a high contrast situation with clipping at both ends of the histogram. With a raw file you can allow a little clipping of the highlights (there is, of course, a limit) and recover the "lost" detail in pp; with a JPEG what's lost is lost. Therefore, with raw you can use the extra highlights headroom to prevent shadow detail from blocking up quite so much whereas with a JPEG you have to decide what is most imortant, shadow or highlight detail, and sacrifice the other.

This technique with a raw file does noticably help when faced with extremes of lighting but it cannot work miracles. There are still times when the dynamic range of the sensor is well and truly exceded. That is when HDR, exposure blending or good old fashioned graduated filters come into play.
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Old 16th October 2013
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Re: The first rule of wildlife photography...

Sorry to dig up an old thread but just wanted to thank Zuiko for his continued advice.

Also I am viewing this on a different monitor and they look too dark on this one. It has really emphasised how much influence the viewing medium has on the images.
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