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Go Back   Olympus UK E-System User Group > Cameras, lenses and system accessories > Lens focus > Converters, adapters and extension tubes

Converters, adapters and extension tubes All those lens accessories that get in between the lens and the camera.

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  #1  
Old 15th March 2012
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Question lens Protection

Having just bought a 14-54 mk1 from Jon I need to pop the usual lens protection on the front. I've always used a UV filter for that job but these days of course we have dedicated chunks of glass which are, allegedly, optically neutral and built for this very purpose.

It seems useful to canvas the opinions of forumites as to the merits of the traditional v newer ways to protect the object lens on your glass.

All thoughts welcome

Cheers

Hec
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Old 15th March 2012
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Re: lens Protection

I used a thin Hoya UV on it .... transferred to the mk ii! I'm of the opinion that using decent quality filters to protect big pieces of glass gives me some peace of mind, but I don't bother with the smaller micro four thirds lenses.

Cheers,

Jon
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Old 15th March 2012
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Re: lens Protection

For Christmas Nick bought me a Hoya UV for the BIGMA ! now THAT was a good idea I have Hoya UV filters for the 50-200 and a few others too - sooo much cheaper to replace if damaged
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Old 15th March 2012
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Re: lens Protection

You really need 2 stacked, then if one gets damaged you've still got the one underneath protecting the lens.
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Old 15th March 2012
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Re: lens Protection

When I bought my ED 70-300 zoom I also purchased a B+W clear protection filter at the same time and it has been in place ever since. It is made from high quality Schott glass with an extra hard coating to avoid scratches.

However, since then, other people have told me that any filter degrades IQ and that if the filter gets broken, the shards of glass can do more damage than if there was no protection in place. I don't know if this is true or not but when I bought my 50-200 SWD I didn't bother with a filter for it, despite it being a much more expensive lens. I seem to have avoided any damage so far but I would feel happier with a protection filter in place.

Ron
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Old 15th March 2012
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Re: lens Protection

Personally, I only use filters I need for the picture. CPOL, ND etc, I never use a protecting filter, not because I don't think it's a good idea, but because I don't think I need it for what I do. Living in the city, IMO, doesn't really expose my lenses to much danger (I don't think). Worse case scenario for me might be, I bump my camera off a door frame entering a shop, or I bump the lens on the leg, arm or purse of a passerby. I have a friend who takes a lot of shots while he climbs mountains, in his case, I wouldn't leave home without a protective filter (unless his camera strap breaks 200ft in the air....filter won't help there ) but for me, I have lens hoods on all my lenses which seem to do a good job protecting from the odd bump here and there. In the street, my camera is around my neck or in my hand with the strap wrapped several times around my hand and wrist and I'm at the stage where I'm still a little paranoid of damaging my gear the combination of which, seems to keep my lenses safe.
Health and Safety is my profession, so I have the tendency to look at things in a H&S manner. If I do a Risk Assessment on damaging my lenses I find that my risk is very low. I think it really depends on what you do with your equipment, what kind of photography you do, where does your photography take you and how often do you go out, answering these questions, IMO, will give you a good idea as to weather or not you need a protective filter.
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Old 15th March 2012
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Re: lens Protection

Very interesting comments indeed. Thanks for all of them.

It has got me thinking. I've always had a UV filter on my lenses. However I cannot recall ever having scratched or damaged any of them in any way. On that basis I'm now minded not to use one and go for maximum quality out of my 14-54.

If that does not ensure I'll wreck it within 5 mins of using it for the first time I don't know what will

Thanks for the comments thus far guys but keep them coming as it's an interesting subject.

cheers

Hec
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Old 15th March 2012
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Re: lens Protection

I agree with Ozont - use a filter but only if you need it.

This is a topic which has been known to spark Holy wars! I used to put a UV filter on every lens, until I started taking night shots and noticed ghost images of highlights caused by reflection from the lens off the back of the filter. I reckoned that if you could see it that clearly on those shots, it was also affecting normal daytime shots albeit in a less obvious way.

Now I will use a filter if needed for optical reasons (not often thanks to the wonders of Photoshop, although polarisers and ND grads still have their place) or for protection if the environment warrants it - by the sea or in the rain for example.

Ciao ... Unfiltered John
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Old 15th March 2012
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Re: lens Protection

The other occasion when a filter seems like a good idea is when I am on the Norfolk coast in a stiff easterly wind, with lots of sea spray in the air. I feel much more comfortable cleaning it off a filter than the front element of my expensive lens.

Ron
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Old 15th March 2012
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Re: lens Protection

You can also take a look at your Home Owners insurance policy. I seem to recall someone here (or on FTU) dropping their camera in the water, they saved the lens but the camera was pooched. Their home owners insurance covered it. So, home owners policy, extended warranty at the point of purchase and a protective filter seems a little excessive IMO. Use the insurance if you can, and put the money you save on the filter and extended warranty toward another cool lens or memory card.
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Old 7th May 2012
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Re: lens Protection

I know this is a bit old but I've just bought three Hoya Pro 1 Digital protection filters. I also have a Dorr one. They are completely clear and so don't affect the picture at all. I got one from Ebay and two from Amazon to get the best price on different sizes. The 52mm one was only 13.67.
Cheers,
Steve
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Old 30th July 2012
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Re: lens Protection

It's a 'swings and roundabouts' situation; I've always fitted a UV on every lens I've ever owned, (except my 7-14mm!) mainly because of the protection it gives to the front elements coatings. I seem to remember in the dim and distant past, see an article which pointed out that these coatings are only a few light-bands thick and also some of them are not very hard, so regularly cleaning them may well reduce their effectiveness. The down-side may well be that using them, may impact on the accuracy of the colour rendering in ultra-critical circumstances, but I highly suspect that inaccuracies relating to my monitor/printer/ambient room lighting conditions are likely to impart a greater extent on me attaining exact colour reproduction. Another variable which is rarely mentioned and cannot be rectified, is the colour accuracy of a human's eyesight, since most people suffer a slight amount of colour-blindness, so what you are actually seeing, isn't accurate anyway! Have a look here, for a more comprehensive description ...
http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_blindness
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Old 30th July 2012
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Re: lens Protection

A route I've gone down having has a Pentax 110 SLR film camera was the use of rubber lens hoods. These came as standard with the various lens which were part of the original kit and proved a boon. They can be folded back in three stages which protects the front of the barrel and can be used in two other configurations... well worth a look, especially as they can also take filters if required. I've carried forward this idea with various other makes of camera lens and will do so with the 4/3 lens.
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Old 30th July 2012
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Re: lens Protection

I rarely use filters on my lenses BUT I always use a lens hood. It helps keep rainwater and spray off the lens, will generally absorb punishment if a lens is dropped or bashed against a hard object and also helps keep fare at bay.

If I knew I was going to take pictures where there was a lot of salt spray then I'd fit a filter.
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Old 31st July 2012
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Re: lens Protection

Quote:
Originally Posted by Footloose1949 View Post
I seem to remember in the dim and distant past, see an article which pointed out that these coatings are only a few light-bands thick and also some of them are not very hard, so regularly cleaning them may well reduce their effectiveness.
And how many reports have you read about from the recent past about a lens losing it's coating due to cleaning?
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