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Old 26th January 2019
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wornish wornish is offline
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Camera versus The Human Eye

With all the talk about the new EM-X and comparisons with the new FF mirrorless, I started to think about where camera technology is going. This lead on to thinking about how they compare to the human eye.

This article gives a good comparison
https://petapixel.com/2012/11/17/the...the-human-eye/

It made me wonder why more effort is not going in to create curved sensors. Perhaps that's where a non-silicon breakthrough is needed.
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Old 26th January 2019
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Re: Camera versus The Human Eye

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Originally Posted by wornish View Post
It made me wonder why more effort is not going in to create curved sensors. Perhaps that's where a non-silicon breakthrough is needed.

I suspect it might be because the ideal degree of curvature wanted varies with the lenses focal length...
Could be rather tricky with a zoom.
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Old 26th January 2019
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Re: Camera versus The Human Eye

The human eye doesn’t do zoom!
But it can use binoculars.
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Old 27th January 2019
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Re: Camera versus The Human Eye

The lens in the eye can degrade at the early age of 40 years, loss of focussing, loss of clarity due to discolouring, apart from that the "film plane" can come away from the backing plate. Most of these will happen to most eye users.

Wheras the OMD Em etc goes obsolete after 3 years <g>
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Old 27th January 2019
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Re: Camera versus The Human Eye

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Originally Posted by DerekW View Post
The lens in the eye can degrade at the early age of 40 years, loss of focussing, loss of clarity due to discolouring, apart from that the "film plane" can come away from the backing plate. Most of these will happen to most eye users.
Yes, in the past couple of years I've been visiting Moorefields, receiving injections in my right eye for 'wet macula degeneration'. The affected eye is the right, which used to be my dominant eye. This means that I can't use a watchmaker's eyeglass in that eye and have to view a microscope, telescope and camera viewfinder in my left.

There's no cure - the injections suppress the abnormal vein growth and fluid build up on the retina.

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Old 29th January 2019
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Re: Camera versus The Human Eye

Thanks for the link, Dave, it is an interesting topic.

I think that (unless I missed it of course) the author overlooked something very important, which is our understanding of perspective. I have been thinking about this a lot, prompted partly by Paul's splendid photos of the Flatiron building and the difficulty of getting realistic correction of converging verticals. The article talks about scanning what we are looking at in order to use the very sensitive parts of the retina, but doesn't talk about our comprehension of the wider scene.

I think that we do something similar on the wider scale. When faced with something big like a landscape or a building, we sweep it with our eyes and integrate the result into what we think we are seeing. If we try this with a camera lens we will get all sorts of odd results - this is why unless we are really careful with ultra-wide lenses the results can look plain wrong, and why multi-image stitching is a lot more complex than we think.

Maybe a thought experiment will help put into words what I am thinking. Imagine standing in a flat featureless plain, with a wall of constant height in front of us. If we look directly at the wall, the top looks horizontal and level. If we look at it from an angle, the top and the base will converge towards a vanishing point. So far so simple, and this is what a camera will see. But what we actually do is swivel our eyes around to scan the scene, and our brains make a composite picture. When we swivel out eyes we are changing the angle at which we view the wall, so most of the time we will see converging lines in one direction or the other. Somehow our brain combines all these different views without any problem - but when we try to do it with a camera we have to make some conscious decisions about how to merge the images, and still (usually) none of the options look quite right.

David Hockney thought about this and among other things produced some landscapes based on lots of photos knitted together. At the time I didn't really understand what he was on about but now I think he has a point!

John
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