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Old 12th November 2017
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Re: Before and After?

Quote:
Originally Posted by tomphotofx View Post
I suggested using the auto button primarily as a learning curve trying it out on a varied selection of images to get an idea how the sliders position themselves, its a good way of understanding the workings of Photoshop. Take for example you've taken a batch of photos of a rugby/football match under the same lighting conditions, try the auto button but then tweak the settings to suit, add noise reduction plus white balance correction and maybe dehaze slider save that out as a preset to use on all the images. It will put you in the right ballpark for the majority of images and the ones that didn't work will only take some mild tweaking. It's a time saver nobody wants to manually work on maybe two to three hundred images individually.

Cheers,

Tom
Good points all, Tom. I hadn't really thought of using the auto function as a way of understanding the effects of the sliders, that's a very good idea.

Certainly being able to apply a set of adjustments to several files is useful, but I don't know how generally applicable it is across different editors. Lightroom is quite well designed for it, I don't know about Oly viewer or others.

Sadly it isn't all that useful for outdoor sports as the light changes all the time. Most dramatically if you change ends at half-time, but also - as well as natural variations of sun & cloud - a lot of outdoor sports tend to be timed to finish as it gets dark which means the light changes a lot and rapidly in the last half-hour or so.

I have to photograph some indoor walking football at a leisure centre tomorrow. The lighting is horrible from what I remember, but at least it is constant. It will be worth taking a lot of care to balance the first one right then apply the mods to the whole set.

John
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