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-   -   Sensor Cleaning (https://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=46797)

iso 16th December 2017 05:20 PM

Sensor Cleaning
 
Have been quoted 39.99 by LCE for a sensor clean for a 5mk ll. Is this reasonable??

pdk42 16th December 2017 06:21 PM

Re: Sensor Cleaning
 
Sounds a bit steep for a 5 min job. I'd be tempted to do it myself TBH. It's not difficult, but you'll need some sensor swabs and fluid. That'll probably cost you 40, but you'll be able to clean it many times.

drmarkf 16th December 2017 06:30 PM

Re: Sensor Cleaning
 
I was charged 25 some years ago at Campkins in Cambridge when something large, sticky and nasty attached itself to my M1's sensor.

Shows the value of getting them cleaned for free every year at the NEC (they also do a full body internal clean, which you probably don't get from a non-Oly service).

MikeOxon 16th December 2017 07:13 PM

Re: Sensor Cleaning
 
I used to clean sensors myself, with wipes and 'eclipse' fluid. I have read, however, that it is unwise to do this on sensors with image stabilisation, because it is possible to damage the mechanism.

Has anyone any hard information?

IainMacD 16th December 2017 08:34 PM

Re: Sensor Cleaning
 
45 at Ffordes!

iso 19th December 2017 06:38 PM

Re: Sensor Cleaning
 
Thanks to all replies. Monday, went into LCE (The Strand). As I had emailed before they knew why I was there and the fella behind the jump ADMITTTED he personally had switched to Oly MFT. Was this sales talk, I don't know. Looking through the ring light they use to illuminate the sensor, it was obvious that at least one Pizza dropping had fallen on it...Anyway by the end of the day all fixed.
His view was that sensors should be cleaned every 6 Months? Now is that Sales talk?
I do tend to change lenses frequently.
Any views on regularity of cleaning?

Ricoh 19th December 2017 06:45 PM

Re: Sensor Cleaning
 
How long is a piece of string?

Clean when it takes too long to spot in PP. but how long is too long?

MJ224 19th December 2017 06:50 PM

Re: Sensor Cleaning
 
I do occasionally use a blower on the sensor, but feel that core of the camera needs leaving alone don't fix it if its not broke comes to mind.

Pizza, how did that get there................*chr

MikeOxon 19th December 2017 06:59 PM

Re: Sensor Cleaning
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by iso (Post 435485)
Any views on regularity of cleaning?

When I used Nikon, I needed to clean the sensors quite often - every couple of months or so - but, after changing to Olympus, I have only had to use a blower brush very occasionally and never anything more rigorous than that.

Always take care when changing lenses. I try to hold the camera face down and avoid changing, if possible, in a hazardous environment - Pizza parlour, sandstorm, etc. :)

Ricoh 19th December 2017 07:17 PM

Re: Sensor Cleaning
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MJ224 (Post 435490)
I do occasionally use a blower on the sensor, but feel that core of the camera needs leaving alone don't fix it if its not broke comes to mind.

Pizza, how did that get there................*chr

Blowing is probably the worst thing you can do. You need to vacuum the dirt, not blow more in.

drmarkf 19th December 2017 07:29 PM

Re: Sensor Cleaning
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ricoh (Post 435503)
Blowing is probably the worst thing you can do. You need to vacuum the dirt, not blow more in.

I disagree, Steve. We're talking about an amateur blowing with a rocket blower, of course, not your gob, and this should be the first step if the sensor 'cleaning mode' (depending on the camera manufacturer) hasn't worked.

I don't really know what you mean by a 'vacuum', but I can't see how it would do anything unless you touched the internals with a vacuuming implement, and with the blower you don't need to touch anything with anything if you do it carefully. So that should go first IMHO.

Useful podcast (and anyone who's ever owned one of those renowned dust magnets known as a Sony A7, A7R or A7S will know that their owners have a lot of experience dealing with dust bunnies):
https://thisweekinphoto.com/alphamir...ers-questions/

iso 19th December 2017 07:30 PM

Re: Sensor Cleaning
 
I used Blowers on DLSR’s. Chunky stuff that I believed wouldtake it. Don’t think I would try that on mirrorless. LCE guy opined thatmirrorless is far more sensitive and I would agree with that. Steve – you are right, but you do need to catchearly when there is a problem. I didn’t and as a result had to bin some stuff.

Ricoh 19th December 2017 08:07 PM

Re: Sensor Cleaning
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by drmarkf (Post 435508)
I disagree, Steve. We're talking about an amateur blowing with a rocket blower, of course, not your gob, and this should be the first step if the sensor 'cleaning mode' (depending on the camera manufacturer) hasn't worked.

I don't really know what you mean by a 'vacuum', but I can't see how it would do anything unless you touched the internals with a vacuuming implement, and with the blower you don't need to touch anything with anything if you do it carefully. So that should go first IMHO.

Useful podcast (and anyone who's ever owned one of those renowned dust magnets known as a Sony A7, A7R or A7S will know that their owners have a lot of experience dealing with dust bunnies):
https://thisweekinphoto.com/alphamir...ers-questions/

Here you go Mark
http://www.green-clean.at/en/product...ng-system.html

pdk42 19th December 2017 10:30 PM

Re: Sensor Cleaning
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by iso (Post 435509)
I used Blowers on DLSR’s. Chunky stuff that I believed wouldtake it. Don’t think I would try that on mirrorless. LCE guy opined thatmirrorless is far more sensitive and I would agree with that. Steve – you are right, but you do need to catchearly when there is a problem. I didn’t and as a result had to bin some stuff.

I can't see any reason why mirrorless sensors should, as a matter of principle, be more "sensitive ". The IBIS adds an extra dimension for sure, but if you think about it, once powered down the sensor is free to move about and you can clearly hear this if you shake the camera - even gently.

Remember that the sensor is actually a stack of layers (about 4mm thick in the case of m43) and the outer layer is glass. What you're cleaning is actually a flat glass plate. So long as you use the right equipment and chemicals then a wet clean is no different to cleaning your spectacles with a cleaner spray and microfibre cloth.

Ricoh 19th December 2017 11:24 PM

Re: Sensor Cleaning
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by pdk42 (Post 435527)
I can't see any reason why mirrorless sensors should, as a matter of principle, be more "sensitive ". The IBIS adds an extra dimension for sure, but if you think about it, once powered down the sensor is free to move about and you can clearly hear this if you shake the camera - even gently.

Remember that the sensor is actually a stack of layers (about 4mm thick in the case of m43) and the outer layer is glass. What you're cleaning is actually a flat glass plate. So long as you use the right equipment and chemicals then a wet clean is no different to cleaning your spectacles with a cleaner spray and microfibre cloth.

Hands up I'm a bit lazy to google the answer. If the stack is not bonded then cleaning fluid could enter the gap. The Clint Eastwood question: 'well do you feel lucky...'. If bonded then a better outcome, possibly. Thinking a bit since beginning typing, I'd say the designers would not want air gaps and change in refractive index.
Minimise the amount of fluid.


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