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-   -   Wildlife Photography (and all its difficulties…) (https://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=36463)

tenzan 10th February 2015 07:42 PM

Wildlife Photography (and all its difficulties…)
 
Hi all,

I had a trip to Gaddon Loch at the weekend, near Glenrothes, and took some bird photos. I was surprised at how few 'keepers' I had - lots were out of focus. Would be grateful for any feedback on the three below and any tips/advice in general for bird photography.

I was using an E3 with a 150mm f2 and EC20. I found C-AF not all that effective, but I think it might have been me…:)

Is it just me, or do Robins like to 'pose'. They all seemed quite happy to be photographed quite close up.

Thank you,

tenzan


http://www.e-group.uk.net/gallery/da...bs/Swans-2.jpg

http://www.e-group.uk.net/gallery/da...s/Robin-21.jpg

http://www.e-group.uk.net/gallery/da...bs/Gulls-2.jpg

Miketoll 10th February 2015 07:50 PM

Re: Wildlife Photography (and all its difficulties…)
 
Bird photography is tough. I don't think any mirrorless camera is really up to effective C-AF especially for subjects like BIF although hopefully things will improve in the future.

PeterBirder 10th February 2015 09:02 PM

Re: Wildlife Photography (and all its difficulties…)
 
These look quite good to me, viewing the full size images in the gallery.

Olympus digital cameras have never been too hot on CAF for BIF. However much also depends on technique, a bit of knowledge of the way birds behave and a lot of practice. Some of us, like me, have never managed any great success with BIF whilst others obviously have the neccessary skill and persistence to succeed. You're right about Robins,I've got lots of pictures of them.;)

Regards.*chr

Quote:

Originally Posted by Miketoll (Post 330318)
Bird photography is tough. I don't think any mirrorless camera is really up to effective C-AF especially for subjects like BIF although hopefully things will improve in the future.

These were taken with the E-3 which is a DSLR not mirrorless.

Jim Ford 10th February 2015 09:31 PM

Re: Wildlife Photography (and all its difficulties…)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by tenzan (Post 330317)
I was using an E3 with a 150mm f2 and EC20. I found C-AF not all that effective, but I think it might have been me…:)

I know it's for the E5, but you might find the advice in the following link helpful:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/50099629

Jim

IainMacD 10th February 2015 10:10 PM

Re: Wildlife Photography (and all its difficulties…)
 
I thought the full sized images might help in this thread - I hope you don't mind Tenzan?

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/Swans-2.jpg

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/Robin-21.jpg

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/Gulls-2.jpg

David M 10th February 2015 10:43 PM

Re: Wildlife Photography (and all its difficulties…)
 
I prefer manual focus for all my bird/nature photography.

Imageryone 10th February 2015 11:26 PM

Re: Wildlife Photography (and all its difficulties…)
 
Using the Ec20 you are effectively losing 2 stops on that 150mm, you may find that if you turn your exposure comp to -3 or -7 will regain that two stops, but your images will consequently be slightly under exposed. I use these on my E3 and get great detail.

David Morison 10th February 2015 11:34 PM

Re: Wildlife Photography (and all its difficulties…)
 
Considering you are using the EC20 which does reduce IQ, even on the 150mm f2, I think the results are pretty good. As for the percentage of keepers you are getting this could be down to experience in photographing birds so keep at it and the rate I'm sure will improve. Even though I've been doing it for years and am now mainly using a Canon 7D Mk2 for birds I still have quite a few that are unsatisfactory.

David

byegad 11th February 2015 07:58 AM

Re: Wildlife Photography (and all its difficulties…)
 
It does take practice, I get a few keepers with my E M10 and 40-150 f4-5.6 and 75-300 f4.8-6.7 II, but not a huge percentage! It took me several tries to get any keepers, and a lot of trial and error in setting up the camera for those.

Here's one from a Birds of Prey day I attended last year.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3871/...68f5a71ea2.jpgP6080163 by Geoff Dabbs, on Flickr

And another less successful and very heavily cropped shot.

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2927/...7c1dbd4196.jpg1010715 by Geoff Dabbs, on Flickr

tenzan 11th February 2015 09:36 AM

Re: Wildlife Photography (and all its difficulties…)
 
Hi All,

Thanks for all the responses - it's been really helpful. And the full size images are much better to look at - I'm not sure how to do this, so just had thumbnail links.

What I found fascinating was actually viewing the birds through the camera. There is feather detail that I wasn't aware of. And although I need to rethink my C-AF approach, taking burst shots of the gulls, and viewing them later, I found the movement of the wings remarkable.

Well, off to find another Robin. With the one I took above, there was actually a treecreeper on the trunk of the tree (would have liked to have got one of that!), but it wizzed around the other side and I missed it. The Robin could feel my pain, so stepped in.

Needless to say my respect for wildlife photographers has increased immeasurably!

Thanks again,

tenzan

PS Great photo of the owl, Geoff!

Dave in Wales 11th February 2015 09:50 AM

Re: Wildlife Photography (and all its difficulties…)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by tenzan (Post 330385)
Hi All,

Thanks for all the responses - it's been really helpful. And the full size images are much better to look at - I'm not sure how to do this, so just had thumbnail links.

What I found fascinating was actually viewing the birds through the camera. There is feather detail that I wasn't aware of. And although I need to rethink my C-AF approach, taking burst shots of the gulls, and viewing them later, I found the movement of the wings remarkable.

Well, off to find another Robin. With the one I took above, there was actually a treecreeper on the trunk of the tree (would have liked to have got one of that!), but it wizzed around the other side and I missed it. The Robin could feel my pain, so stepped in.

Needless to say my respect for wildlife photographers has increased immeasurably!

Thanks again,

tenzan

PS Great photo of the owl, Geoff!

Three great shots there.
Not using an EM1 by any chance are you, the C-AF capability is supposed to be improved in the next FW update 3, this month. :D

Jim Ford 11th February 2015 11:41 AM

Re: Wildlife Photography (and all its difficulties…)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by tenzan (Post 330385)
And although I need to rethink my C-AF approach, taking burst shots of the gulls!

Check the link I provided earlier - it will provide you with what you need to know about using C-AF on an Olympus!

Jim

tenzan 11th February 2015 01:06 PM

Re: Wildlife Photography (and all its difficulties…)
 
hi David and Jim,

David, I'm using an E3, but sorely tempted by the EM1 as I could use the 4/3rds lenses I have - I think the birds would have flown away by the time the EM5 focusses. Will be interesting to see if the update improves anything.

Out of interest Robin Wong has a good blog about shooting with Zuiko Digital Four Thirds lenses on the EM1:

http://robinwong.blogspot.co.uk/2013...ting-with.html

It's a really useful link - thanks Jim.

Ian 11th February 2015 01:55 PM

Re: Wildlife Photography (and all its difficulties…)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Miketoll (Post 330318)
Bird photography is tough. I don't think any mirrorless camera is really up to effective C-AF especially for subjects like BIF although hopefully things will improve in the future.

He's using an E-3 - which is a DSLR of course.

Ian

sapper 11th February 2015 05:39 PM

Re: Wildlife Photography (and all its difficulties…)
 
I think the images are fine. The one of the two gulls is brilliant I think. They certainly look better full size. I too get a lot of to of focus images of birds, trouble is, most are very small, and they keep moving:)
Quote:

Originally Posted by tenzan (Post 330317)
Hi all,

I had a trip to Gaddon Loch at the weekend, near Glenrothes, and took some bird photos. I was surprised at how few 'keepers' I had - lots were out of focus. Would be grateful for any feedback on the three below and any tips/advice in general for bird photography.

I was using an E3 with a 150mm f2 and EC20. I found C-AF not all that effective, but I think it might have been me…:)

Is it just me, or do Robins like to 'pose'. They all seemed quite happy to be photographed quite close up.

Thank you,

tenzan


http://www.e-group.uk.net/gallery/da...bs/Swans-2.jpg

http://www.e-group.uk.net/gallery/da...s/Robin-21.jpg

http://www.e-group.uk.net/gallery/da...bs/Gulls-2.jpg



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