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  • Panning for Motor Sports

    * Henry
    * Location: Subang Jaya, Selangor
    * Malaysia


    All my garbage so far.

  • #2
    Re: Panning for Motor Sports

    Could be vibration. I met the same issue when photographing the air ambulance - as it went on full power for lift off, you could see the section below the rotor vibrating, yet the ends were sharp.

    Also the possibility of the camera 'finding' the middle, and as the shutter operates, the ends are moving in time relative to the point it fixed on. Have you tried focusing on the front? As it is, the front is sharper than the rear.

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    • #3
      Re: Panning for Motor Sports

      Did you use mechanical shutter - or the electronic ('Silent') shutter?
      If you used electronic shutter what you are seeing might be due to the well known "rolling shutter" effect - because the camera takes ~ 1/60 sec to readout all the sensor's pixels.
      Chris

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      • #4
        Re: Panning for Motor Sports

        Does the E-M1 have a horizontal or vertical shutter (& if horizontal does it go left right or right left)?
        If it's a horizontal shutter then your panning at either end of the shot might not have been quite as good as that in the middle. The blur doesn't look OOF to me & looks significantly worse at the back. Are you remembering to follow through sufficiently?

        Road bumps can give vibrations at one end of the car while the other end & center remain sharp - but I'd expect that to be vertical movement which doesn't seem to be the case here.
        I've had similar cases with my Pentax DSLR where just the back of the car showed blur, but closer inspection showed it to be nearly all vertical movement (I got many shots like this at the same spot). I've eventually pinned it down to road bumps after some comments from the loud speakers!
        Mike
        Compulsive photographic Dabbler.
        Flickr

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        • #5
          Re: Panning for Motor Sports

          Couldn't it just be the extra vibration of the flimsy bodywork around the engine area? plus that wing must be getting quite a buffeting from the airflow? I don't know really just a few thoughts.
          http://www.flickr.com/photos/flip_photo_flickr/

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          • #6
            Re: Panning for Motor Sports

            This is quite normal with panning shots at slow shutter speeds. It is caused by the difference in motion RELATIVE TO YOU of the front, middle and back of the car. You will be panning by rotating about a spot. The line of ‘frozen motion’ is therefore described by an arc centred on your rotation point.

            The car, however, is travelling (more or less) in a straight line. The line of he car’s motion intersects with your ‘frozen motion’ arc at a tangent. In this case, the middle of the car is at the tangent and is frozen. The front and rear of the car are not on the arc and so they are not frozen. Given that you are using a very short focal length, the car must be quite close to you. Thus, the deviation of the front an rear of the cars from the ideal arc is significant.

            Consider what happens when you pan with the car. When it is far away, you swing slowly. As it approaches, you swing more quickly. You swing fastest when the car is closest to you. As it moves away, you have to slow your swing down again. This is an analogous situation. Because the front, middle and back of the car are at a different distance to you, they require a different swing rate to be frozen. They can’t all be sharp at the same time unless the car is driving in a circle with you at the centre.

            When you take pictures of cars going around corners, you will see these effects magnified as the relative motions of front, middle and rear become more pronounced because the car will be moving in an arc that deviates from the panning arc more significantly.

            By the way, I would consider your shot to be ‘perfectly sharp’. I never expect a shot of a moving car that is taken with a shutter speed that shows a sense of motion to be sharp everywhere. It just needs to be sharp in the important areas.

            I should add that vibrations as mentioned by others will also play a part in making some parts blurred.

            Mark

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            • #7
              Re: Panning for Motor Sports

              I had several goes at writing what you've just said and couldn't make it clear when read so gave up!

              Well written explanation!
              I didn’t get where I am today....

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              • #8
                Re: Panning for Motor Sports

                Ditto - thanks and well done Mark for putting into words the vague thoughts I was having.

                John

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                • #9
                  Re: Panning for Motor Sports

                  Excellent explanation Mark, nice one.
                  http://www.flickr.com/photos/flip_photo_flickr/

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                  • #10
                    Re: Panning for Motor Sports

                    Wow. Thank you guys for those kind words. I'm delighted to contribute usefully to this wonderful forum.

                    Mark

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                    • #11
                      Re: Panning for Motor Sports

                      Excellent explanation. Also it is easy to rotate the camera around the lens axis as you pan which can deliver a similar result.

                      Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
                      Stuff from Cuba
                      More stuff from Cuba
                      It all started here

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                      • #12
                        Re: Panning for Motor Sports

                        Originally posted by Gwyver View Post
                        Did you use mechanical shutter - or the electronic ('Silent') shutter?
                        If you used electronic shutter what you are seeing might be due to the well known "rolling shutter" effect - because the camera takes ~ 1/60 sec to readout all the sensor's pixels.
                        Silent shutter (0s)

                        Originally posted by Petrochemist View Post
                        Does the E-M1 have a horizontal or vertical shutter (& if horizontal does it go left right or right left)?....
                        Sorry, I really don't know that

                        Originally posted by Phill D View Post
                        Couldn't it just be the extra vibration of the flimsy bodywork around the engine area? plus that wing must be getting quite a buffeting from the airflow? I don't know really just a few thoughts.
                        Very high possibility as those clip on bodies are so light.

                        I really like that explination.. So I am ok with my shots
                        * Henry
                        * Location: Subang Jaya, Selangor
                        * Malaysia


                        All my garbage so far.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Panning for Motor Sports

                          You should be, they are great action shots..........
                          Mark Johnson

                          My Sailing Page

                          My Flickr

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                          • #14
                            * Henry
                            * Location: Subang Jaya, Selangor
                            * Malaysia


                            All my garbage so far.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Panning for Motor Sports

                              That looks pretty good to me. One suggestion generally: better to get shots nearer to head-on if you can. Then you only really have to worry about getting the front bit really sharp, and they also tend to look more dramatic.

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