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  • Focusing In The Studio

    Not sure if this is the right place but looking for help with the best focusing combinations for studio work. Been to a local camera club a few times now, with the studio lights at around iso100 1/250 f8 - f11. yet ambient light nearer iso800 1/30 f2.8.
    These under studio


    This with ambient.


    My question is for the best focus settings on the E620 & E600, be it sensor, contrast or hybrid. also noticed some of my lenses hunt more than others.
    E500 - E600 - E620 - HLD5 x2 - 17.5-45mm - 14-42mm - 14-45mm - Sigma 30mm f1.4 - 25mm f2.8 - 40-150mmMI (3.5) - Sirius 60-300mm f4-5.6 - Chinon 55mm f1.4 - Chinon 200mm f3.5 - FL50 - FL36 - Raynox DCR2020PRO

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/photonutter/

  • #2
    Re: Focusing In The Studio

    I really don't know how to answer this as it's not my sort of photography and I understand your subjects are moving all the time.
    I would say live view and manual if they were static but probably not much help.

    No4 is a really good picture.
    All the best

    Being left handed my brain sometimes works sdrawkcab

    Andy

    Lots of cameras and lenses.


    My Flickr

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    • #3
      Re: Focusing In The Studio

      Ummm, its quiet over at FTU so popped in around here. I'm not British but I'll try to give this a British slant for the sake of the site...

      A cold shower and think of the Queen should settle the focus down a bit.



      ... I'm getting my coat and going back over

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      • #4
        Re: Focusing In The Studio

        No.1 and No.4 are really good - When shooting people I tend to get the best shots when they are 'off-guard' like the girls in front of the mirror.
        I have very little experience with photo studios, but the few time I tried this, I generlly used handheld shooting using viewfinder, single focus point, ISO200 and shutter speeds between 1/80 and 1/250.
        And I am not a huge fan of the big studio flashes to be honest.
        I prefer to go close using the FL-36 and a slave flash on a tripod

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        • #5
          Re: Focusing In The Studio

          Thinking this may help out with any low light focusing issues, so my findings from this next shoot.

          The previous shots were all taken with the hybred focus choice for live view or multi point af through the eyepiece. By switching to single point sensor af and choosing small area whilst disabling face detection, has dramaticaly decreased focusing times and increased accuracy. Not sure if it's down to the camera trying to do less, or a more measured approach to where the focus should be, but works for me.


          Strawberry Venom by Photonutter, on Flickr
          E500 - E600 - E620 - HLD5 x2 - 17.5-45mm - 14-42mm - 14-45mm - Sigma 30mm f1.4 - 25mm f2.8 - 40-150mmMI (3.5) - Sirius 60-300mm f4-5.6 - Chinon 55mm f1.4 - Chinon 200mm f3.5 - FL50 - FL36 - Raynox DCR2020PRO

          http://www.flickr.com/photos/photonutter/

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          • #6
            Re: Focusing In The Studio

            Single point AF locked on the eye is all I have ever used in the studio.
            Regards Paul.
            One day I hope to be the person my dogs think I am.

            https://www.flickr.com/photos/paul_silk/

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            • #7
              Re: Focusing In The Studio

              Originally posted by OlyPaul View Post
              Single point AF locked on the eye is all I have ever used in the studio.
              Totally agree and also with wildlife shots. Single centre point to lock focus on the eye and re-compose. Multiple focus points means you can't be absolutely sure of perfect focus on eyes.

              Steve
              Old divers never die, they just go down on old wrecks
              Take nothing but photographs, leave nothing but bubbles
              My website

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              • #8
                Re: Focusing In The Studio

                Originally posted by OlyPaul View Post
                Single point AF locked on the eye is all I have ever used in the studio.
                As much as the eye may be drawn to various parts of a portrait, the eyes are the most important to have in sharp focus & a single AF point for that position is best used. I just thought this thread was worth bringing back to the top again.

                Ross
                I fiddle with violins (when I'm not fiddling with a camera).
                Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ross-the-fiddler/
                Cameras: OM-D E-M1 & Mk II, Olympus Stylus 1, OM-D E-M5.
                Lenses: M.ZD7-14mm f2.8 PRO Lens, M.ZD12-40mm f2.8 PRO Lens, M.ZD40-150mm f2.8 PRO Lens, MC-14, MC-20, M.ZD45mm f1.8, M.ZD12-50, M.ZD60 Macro, M.ZD75-300 Mk II, MMF-3, ZD14-54 II, Sigma 150mm F2.8 APO Macro DG HSM.
                Flashes: FL36R X2, FL50R, FL50.
                Software: Capture One Pro 10 (& Olympus Viewer 3).

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