Announcement

Collapse

December's CHALLENGE

The topic to inspire your creative juices this month is BOXES

See more
See less

Communal Night-Sky Photography Thread

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Re: Communal Night-Sky Photography Thread

    Thanks Wally not sure about that but it wasn't all that cold on the night and I was only outside for a few minutes before it locked up. It's been fine since touch wood but I haven't dared to try the 60fps since.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/flip_photo_flickr/

    Comment


    • Re: Communal Night-Sky Photography Thread

      Had a go at the moon last night. This is a stack of 5 frames taken using my EM1mk2 with the 300mm and 1.4x teleconverter.

      Dave

      My Flickr

      Comment


      • Re: Communal Night-Sky Photography Thread

        Originally posted by Phill D View Post
        I did wonder about the buffer being full but surely it should say writing to the card or something? Not just lock up. The card was a 32GB Lexar 1800x UHSII card that I bought deliberately to try out pro capture about 6 months ago so I'd hope it was fast enough. Camera seems to have recovered ok now but i will try it again one evening to see if it throws a wobbly again.
        Mark Johnson

        My Sailing Page

        My Flickr

        Comment


        • Mark Johnson

          My Sailing Page

          My Flickr

          Comment


          • Mark Johnson

            My Sailing Page

            My Flickr

            Comment


            • Re: Communal Night-Sky Photography Thread

              Last night, I tried taking a 'whole sky' photo with my Meike 6.5mm fish-eye lens, mounted on my E-M1 Mk.ii.

              The lens was pointing vertically upwards on a tripod which I set up in the middle of the road outside my house. Light pollution was terrible, with a bright street lamp causing flare at the bottom of the photo and plenty of lights on in surrounding houses, even at midnight. This was purely an experiment but I was pleasantly surprised by the resolution of the Meike lens.



              At f/2 aperture, there was coma towards the edges of the circle but this disappeared at f/8. After a few experiments, I decided to set around f/2.8 (no click stops on the lens) and gave 10 seconds exposure at ISO 1250. I had to crouch down below the tripod to keep myself out of the 190 degree image circle and, to focus, I viewed the image on the tilt screen, with magnification.


              Orion was only just rising above the house roofs (lower left) and I have marked the belt stars and the Pleiades cluster to help orientation when viewing.

              Later in the year, when Orion is rising earlier, I shall take the lens to a better location, with less light pollution.
              Mike
              visit my Natural History Photos website:
              http://www.botanicdesign.co.uk/Natur...story/home.htm

              Comment


              • Re: Communal Night-Sky Photography Thread

                The stars are pin sharp, I really like the overall effect with the lights around the image.

                Very well done.
                Dave

                My Flickr

                Comment


                • Mark Johnson

                  My Sailing Page

                  My Flickr

                  Comment


                  • Re: Communal Night-Sky Photography Thread

                    Yes, as a whole picture it is something different but likeable.
                    Cameras: E-M5, E-PM2, OM40, OM4Ti
                    Lenses (M.Zuiko Digital): 7-14mm/F2.8, 12-40mm/F2.8, 40-150mm/F2.8+TC1.4x, 12-50mm/F3.5-6.3, 14-42mm/F3.5-5.6 EZ, M.ZD 40-150 F4-5.6 R, 75-300mm/F4.8-6.7 Mk1, 12mm/F2, 17mm/F1.8
                    Lenses (OM Zuiko): 50mm/F1.2, 24mm/F2, 35mm/F2.8 shift
                    Lenses (OM Fit): Vivitar Series II 28-105mm/F2.8-3.8, Sigma 21-35mm/F3.4-4.2, Sigma 35-70mm/F2.8-4, Sigma 75-200mm/F2.8-3.5, Vivitar Series II 100-500mm/F5.6-8.0, Centon 500mm/F8 Mirror
                    Learn something new every day

                    Comment


                    • Re: Communal Night-Sky Photography Thread

                      I pointed the 700mm setup towards Jupiter while studying the lunar eclipse on 2018-07-27 just as there was an opening through the clouds. Not sure what settings would have been suitable as I have no experience of this kind of photography. I went for 1/125 s to mitigate wind and fired a handful of shots with ISO 1600... 12800 and then stacked them. Probably longer time and lower ISO would have yielded better results.

                      Not the best of shots, details washed out and I should have corrected chromatic abberation. The interesting parts though is the four Galilean moons which are clearly visible, I was not expecting that. From light intensity and color I would guess from L to R: Io, Euopea (at 5 o'clock close to Jupiter), Ganymedes and Callisto. But someone may want to correct me.


                      My Gallery on 500px

                      Comment


                      • Re: Communal Night-Sky Photography Thread

                        You did well to get them being so feint. I was shooting the moon a while ago with my 12-100 at 100mm and got Jupiter in the shot too. I was very surprised to see all 4 moons as well when I looked closely at the image. In my case I was just lucky though.
                        http://www.flickr.com/photos/flip_photo_flickr/

                        Comment


                        • Re: Communal Night-Sky Photography Thread

                          Moon taken 18 Nov. EM1mk2 + 300 + MC14

                          Dave

                          My Flickr

                          Comment


                          • Re: Communal Night-Sky Photography Thread

                            I pointed the 75-300 at the moon tonight, from my back step and hoped for the best.... this lark isn't easy is it! The image is very poor compared to those in this thread!
                            I will return when I've got it figured out!
                            Junk on Flickr
                            Even more Junk on Instagram

                            Comment


                            • Re: Communal Night-Sky Photography Thread

                              Originally posted by Phill D View Post
                              You did well to get them being so feint. I was shooting the moon a while ago with my 12-100 at 100mm and got Jupiter in the shot too. I was very surprised to see all 4 moons as well when I looked closely at the image. In my case I was just lucky though.
                              Thanks Phil,

                              I found this pretty good article explaining how to photograph Jupiter without complicating things too much. http://soggyastronomer.com/how-to-ph...er-and-saturn/

                              For best results I also read in another article https://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3996096 that you should aim at stepping down to around F/30 and then resample the photo/s for a best match between the camera sensor pixel density and the size the object occupies on the sensor. I must admit I lost track at times.

                              I might give it a shot. I have 4/3 teleconverters that I could stack using to achieve nearly 3000 mm focal length. But spotting and locking the setup on Jupiter at F/30 will be a challenge and it better be dead calm. Hmm...

                              My Gallery on 500px

                              Comment


                              • Re: Communal Night-Sky Photography Thread

                                Originally posted by Tordan58 View Post
                                I would guess from L to R: Io, Euopea (at 5 o'clock close to Jupiter), Ganymedes and Callisto. But someone may want to correct me.

                                I compared your photo (which I enhanced a little) with an image from Stellarium set to the same date, as shown below:





                                As you can see, the moons are (L to R): Io, Callisto, Ganymede, Europa. I recommend Stellarium as excellent (free) software for examining details in the night sky.


                                I think your photo is suffering from poor focus and/or flare. Unfortunately, with even 700 mm lens array you will find your images are 'pixel limited' as I demonstrated in #118 in this thread. Planetary photography needs a telescope to provide a larger image to the sensor. Others on here will be able to explain in more detail.
                                Mike
                                visit my Natural History Photos website:
                                http://www.botanicdesign.co.uk/Natur...story/home.htm

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X