Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Banded centipede Lithobius variegatus

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Banded centipede Lithobius variegatus

    This is quite a common species. I often find centipedes when I am searching rotten logs, etc. for macro subjects. The trouble is that they invariably move very fast and even getting them in the frame seems impossible.

    This was a very different scenario. When I picked up the log, to search for slime moulds, this individual was fully exposed and immobile. It remained so while I took a dozen or so shots and was still absolutely motionless when I replaced the log where I found it.

    I thought that this individual must have been about to moult and I expected to find an empty skin the next morning. I did not, there being no trace of the centipede.

    The stereos are crosseye.

    Olympus EM-1, Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 macro, plus a Raynox MSN-202 supplementary for the closer shots. Triple TTL flash.

    Harold













    The body is willing but the mind is weak.

  • #2
    Re: Banded centipede Lithobius variegatus

    I have been enjoying your images for some little while and these to me above are quite outstanding.

    Thanks.


    Regards. Barr1e
    Just like that - gone in a flash! Now in use.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Banded centipede Lithobius variegatus

      Originally posted by Barr1e View Post
      I have been enjoying your images for some little while and these to me above are quite outstanding.

      Thanks.


      Regards. Barr1e
      Thanks, Barrie.

      I am helped a bit by the leather-like appearance of the "skin" of the centipede, also the case with earwigs.

      Harold
      The body is willing but the mind is weak.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Banded centipede Lithobius variegatus

        Nice macro shots Harold. Can you explain how you do the stereo shots?
        Paul
        E-M1ii, Pen-F and too many lenses
        flickr
        Portfolio Site
        Instagram

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Banded centipede Lithobius variegatus

          Originally posted by pdk42 View Post
          Nice macro shots Harold. Can you explain how you do the stereo shots?
          Thanks, Paul.

          I have recently drafted an account:

          Stereo, or “3D”, is an effect from viewing two suitable images, such that the brain fuses them into a single image with apparent depth, looking much as did the original subject. In the traditional viewers prints or transparencies are viewed side by side, the left eye seeing the original left view, and the right seeing the right view. Anaglyphs do this is a single image, with the left and right each with its colour code and coloured spectacles make each eye see the correct view.

          The version I mostly use is “crosseye”, where the left and right views are transposed and both can be seen when viewed normally. Crossing the eyes gives the stereo effect. This is the best for viewing on a monitor but it can take lots of practice to make it work.

          Irrespective of which method of presentation is to be used, shooting stereo pairs is the same. Each pair needs two images shot from different angles horizontally, the difference determining the degree of effect, from realistic to in-your face exaggeration. If you study the literature on the subject you will see “base separation” mentioned. That is all about first camera position to second camera position distances. The trigonometry is really about angles and I use entirely angles.

          The basic technique outside of macro is to take a shot when putting your weight on the left foot (noting the central object in the scene) and then moving to the right foot*, the same object being kept central in the frame for a second shot. (Twin-lens stereo cameras can’t do this and it becomes more important the closer you get to the subject). In general, a small aperture maximises the final effect. *If you prefer, you can reverse the sequence but it helps in subsequent pairing if you stick to one preference.

          When you take two images in sequence, beware of the light changing, or the subject, or part thereof, changing position in between. Also, avoid rotating the camera around the axis of the lens. If you have a spirit level function in the camera use that.

          For any macro photography, one of the limitations is that depth of field decreases rapidly as the magnification increases. (The other main one is that increasing magnification incrementally reduces light intensity the “magnification factor“ for which there is no room for details here).

          For stereo macro I apply the same principles. With practice, I can judge the amount of sideways camera movement to achieve the required change of angle. If in doubt, I shoot from 3 or 4 positions and select the best pair later.

          Harold
          The body is willing but the mind is weak.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Banded centipede Lithobius variegatus

            Thank you Harold - that's very interesting. Must give it a try! Is there any software that will do the "Magic Eye" trick combining the two images into one?
            Paul
            E-M1ii, Pen-F and too many lenses
            flickr
            Portfolio Site
            Instagram

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Banded centipede Lithobius variegatus

              Centipedes never bothered me until I came across the House Centipede in Canada. Those things give me the creeps.
              It's the image that's important, not the tools used to make it.

              David M's Photoblog

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Banded centipede Lithobius variegatus

                Centipedes are rather revolting creatures! We had a 4 inch red-legged one in our room in Cyprus a few years back. Very relieved when it departed.

                Try this video: [ame="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qf8pAwGsuF4"]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qf8pAwGsuF4[/ame]

                Very good shot, Harold, but.....

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Banded centipede Lithobius variegatus

                  Originally posted by Johnheatingman
                  I've always had a great deal of respect and caution for anything with 2 legs or more that could run faster than I could. These days unfortunately, that covers just about anything.

                  John
                  I don't know if you came across House Centipedes in Canada but they're huge and fast with very long legs. I still avoid killing them, catch and release outside but sometimes they're to fast to catch.
                  It's the image that's important, not the tools used to make it.

                  David M's Photoblog

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Banded centipede Lithobius variegatus

                    Originally posted by David M View Post
                    I don't know if you came across House Centipedes in Canada but they're huge and fast with very long legs. I still avoid killing them, catch and release outside but sometimes they're to fast to catch.
                    There's a story about a very large centipede that crawled across an officer's chest, somewhere in the South of the USA during the Civil War, leaving a trail of blood. He became sick and died within days. The poison is in their four front feet, which are razor sharp, and inject the poison into the victim. Yuk!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Banded centipede Lithobius variegatus

                      Originally posted by pdk42 View Post
                      Thank you Harold - that's very interesting. Must give it a try! Is there any software that will do the "Magic Eye" trick combining the two images into one?
                      http://stereo.jpn.org/eng/stphmkr/

                      Have fun!

                      Harold
                      The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X