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Food Photography - Renaissance Style

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  • Food Photography - Renaissance Style

    A slight departure from my usual style:

    My portfolio site is here, my food site is here, whereas my wedding work is here.

    Olympus Mentor and Elinchrom Ambassador and I also run lighting courses.

  • #2
    Re: Food Photography - Renaissance Style

    We don't get a lot of studio still life photography on this site and this is a wonderful example. It looks deceptively simple but I suspect it was painstakingly set up to ensure every little detail was right.
    John

    "A hundredth of a second here, a hundredth of a second there � even if you put them end to end, they still only add up to one, two, perhaps three seconds, snatched from eternity." ~ Robert Doisneau

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    • #3
      Re: Food Photography - Renaissance Style

      Great still life shot.
      Olympus E-30
      Zuiko 11-22mm
      Zuiko 35mm
      Zuiko 50-200mm
      Zuiko 12-60mm

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      • #4
        Re: Food Photography - Renaissance Style

        Originally posted by Zuiko View Post
        We don't get a lot of studio still life photography on this site and this is a wonderful example. It looks deceptively simple but I suspect it was painstakingly set up to ensure every little detail was right.
        erm.........

        Actually, extremely simple one light setup.
        E-M1 mkII 40-150mm f2.8 @ f8

        I can put up a full walkthrough if you want.
        My portfolio site is here, my food site is here, whereas my wedding work is here.

        Olympus Mentor and Elinchrom Ambassador and I also run lighting courses.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Food Photography - Renaissance Style

          Originally posted by Michael Sewell View Post
          erm.........

          Actually, extremely simple one light setup.
          E-M1 mkII 40-150mm f2.8 @ f8

          I can put up a full walkthrough if you want.
          It's not what you've got it's how you use it that counts! You could give me the light and the items and tell me to produce a picture and I would struggle to make one as good as this. Not just with where to place the light but also with making a pleasing arrangement like you have. you obviously pay great attention to detail, for example I notice that the highlights on the glass don't overlap the highlights on the bottle behind and the placement of the knife leads the eye into the picture from bottom left. Then there are the grapes; is it just by chance that the lighter white grapes separate the darker red ones from the glass and bottle of red wine? Would I have thought to do this or am I just overthinking the whole thing?

          If you don't mind putting up a full walkthrough I will be very grateful.
          John

          "A hundredth of a second here, a hundredth of a second there � even if you put them end to end, they still only add up to one, two, perhaps three seconds, snatched from eternity." ~ Robert Doisneau

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Food Photography - Renaissance Style

            Excellent composition and lighting = excellent photographer IMO.
            Cameras: E-M5, E-PM2, OM40, OM4Ti
            Lenses (M.Zuiko Digital): 7-14mm/F2.8, 12-40mm/F2.8, 40-150mm/F2.8+TC1.4x, 12-50mm/F3.5-6.3, 14-42mm/F3.5-5.6 EZ, M.ZD 40-150 F4-5.6 R, 75-300mm/F4.8-6.7 Mk1, 12mm/F2, 17mm/F1.8
            Lenses (OM Zuiko): 50mm/F1.2, 24mm/F2, 35mm/F2.8 shift
            Lenses (OM Fit): Vivitar Series II 28-105mm/F2.8-3.8, Sigma 21-35mm/F3.4-4.2, Sigma 35-70mm/F2.8-4, Sigma 75-200mm/F2.8-3.5, Vivitar Series II 100-500mm/F5.6-8.0, Centon 500mm/F8 Mirror
            Learn something new every day

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            • #7
              Re: Food Photography - Renaissance Style

              Very nice. Was the reflection in the glass intentional?

              My Gallery on 500px

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              • #8
                Re: Food Photography - Renaissance Style

                Originally posted by Zuiko View Post
                We don't get a lot of studio still life photography on this site and this is a wonderful example. It looks deceptively simple but I suspect it was painstakingly set up to ensure every little detail was right.
                I remember shooting a 'ploughmans lunch' for a pub menu many, many years ago. The hardest part was the beer kept losing its 'sparkle' so had to be drunk and replaced.

                It should be noted that no ploughman would be caught dead eating what passed for his lunch in those days.
                It's the image that's important, not the tools used to make it.

                David M's Photoblog

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                • #9
                  Re: Food Photography - Renaissance Style

                  Originally posted by Tordan58 View Post
                  Very nice. Was the reflection in the glass intentional?
                  Absolutely.
                  Basically to give a "window" reflection, reinforcing the original renaissance feel to the image.
                  My portfolio site is here, my food site is here, whereas my wedding work is here.

                  Olympus Mentor and Elinchrom Ambassador and I also run lighting courses.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Food Photography - Renaissance Style

                    Originally posted by Zuiko View Post
                    If you don't mind putting up a full walkthrough I will be very grateful.
                    My portfolio site is here, my food site is here, whereas my wedding work is here.

                    Olympus Mentor and Elinchrom Ambassador and I also run lighting courses.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Food Photography - Renaissance Style

                      Very nice Michael!

                      Originally posted by Zuiko View Post
                      It's not what you've got it's how you use it that counts! You could give me the light and the items and tell me to produce a picture and I would struggle to make one as good as this. Not just with where to place the light but also with making a pleasing arrangement like you have. you obviously pay great attention to detail, for example I notice that the highlights on the glass don't overlap the highlights on the bottle behind and the placement of the knife leads the eye into the picture from bottom left. Then there are the grapes; is it just by chance that the lighter white grapes separate the darker red ones from the glass and bottle of red wine? Would I have thought to do this or am I just overthinking the whole thing?

                      If you don't mind putting up a full walkthrough I will be very grateful.
                      I'd have to do some serious cleaning up first.

                      Ross
                      I fiddle with violins (when I'm not fiddling with a camera).
                      Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ross-the-fiddler/
                      Cameras: OM-D E-M1 & Mk II, Olympus Stylus 1, OM-D E-M5.
                      Lenses: M.ZD7-14mm f2.8 PRO Lens, M.ZD12-40mm f2.8 PRO Lens, M.ZD40-150mm f2.8 PRO Lens, MC-14, MC-20, M.ZD45mm f1.8, M.ZD12-50, M.ZD60 Macro, M.ZD75-300 Mk II, MMF-3, ZD14-54 II, Sigma 150mm F2.8 APO Macro DG HSM.
                      Flashes: FL36R X2, FL50R, FL50.
                      Software: Capture One Pro 10 (& Olympus Viewer 3).

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                      • #12
                        Re: Food Photography - Renaissance Style

                        Thanks for such an in-depth explanation and really helpful pictures, Michael. Would you mind if I copy this thread onto the Tutorials board so that it is easier to locate in future if someone is searching for advice on this subject?
                        John

                        "A hundredth of a second here, a hundredth of a second there � even if you put them end to end, they still only add up to one, two, perhaps three seconds, snatched from eternity." ~ Robert Doisneau

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Food Photography - Renaissance Style

                          Originally posted by Zuiko View Post
                          Thanks for such an in-depth explanation and really helpful pictures, Michael. Would you mind if I copy this thread onto the Tutorials board so that it is easier to locate in future if someone is searching for advice on this subject?
                          No problem at all, John.

                          If I'm asked for a walkthough on any further posts, I'll message you to see if you feel it should be moved.

                          Sound fair?

                          Obviously, if I'm going to post a tutorial straight off the bat, I'll post it in the tutorial section anyway.
                          My portfolio site is here, my food site is here, whereas my wedding work is here.

                          Olympus Mentor and Elinchrom Ambassador and I also run lighting courses.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Food Photography - Renaissance Style

                            Thanks Michael, that's appreciated.
                            John

                            "A hundredth of a second here, a hundredth of a second there � even if you put them end to end, they still only add up to one, two, perhaps three seconds, snatched from eternity." ~ Robert Doisneau

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Food Photography - Renaissance Style

                              Well in my day if you were shooting say, Ice Cream under studio lights, it was made of soft Concrete, so it didn't melt. If you were doing say a Soup Bowl shot, stuff was straight out of the can (cold), Clear glass Marbles in in the bottom of the bowl, so the liquid sank to the bottom leaving 'good content' on the surface - and someone puffing cigarette smoke over the shot to replicate 'steam/hotness......

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