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Norfolk Hawker dragonfly in flight

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  • Norfolk Hawker dragonfly in flight

    There were several Norfolk Hawker dragonflies at Carlton Marshes yesterday and this one flying up and down one of the drainage dykes. I am very impressed by the C-AF of the E-M1 II, as I have never managed to photograph any dragonflies in flight before. There is still plenty of room for improvement but it is an encouraging start.

    E-M1 II and 75-300 II.













    Ron

  • #2
    Re: Norfolk Hawker dragonfly in flight

    Those are brilliant Ron. I have not got anything anywhere near as good as those!
    https://amandat.smugmug.com

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/ajthrelfall/

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    • #3
      Re: Norfolk Hawker dragonfly in flight

      Ron would it be possible to post your camera settings you used for these shots.
      Thanks Paul
      Paul

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      • #4
        Re: Norfolk Hawker dragonfly in flight

        Wow Ron how are you going to improve on those they are awesome
        http://www.flickr.com/photos/flip_photo_flickr/

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        • #5
          Re: Norfolk Hawker dragonfly in flight

          Paul these are the settings which I used. I am not saying they are the best settings, they are where I am at the moment and I am sure some of them can be improved upon. Let me know if I have missed anything.

          Shutter priority. 1/1600 sec.
          C-AF. Seq Low. 6 fps.
          Release priority On.
          C-AF Lock 0 (I haven't tried changing it yet).
          S-IS Auto (or OFF, I can't decide yet).
          Centre five AF points.

          The dragonfly was zooming up and down the ditch, so I prefocused on a lily pad a little way in front of me. As the dragonfly approached I could see it as a blurry smudge in the viewfinder but as I half pressed the shutter button it snapped into focus. I then immediately pressed the button all the way down and held it there for two or three frames. There is a temptation to release the button and half press it again before taking the shots but that doesn't work. It seems you have to do it all in one continuous motion and trust the autofocusing.

          Ron

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