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Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

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  • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

    Mark Johnson

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    • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

      Plums & Custard Tricholomopsis rutilans

      This was on a detached chunk of rotting branch in a mixed woodland yesterday.

      The stereos are crosseye.

      Olympus EM-1, (aperture priority), Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 macro, f8, f7.1, f 7.1 ISO 800, hand-held.

      Harold











      The body is willing but the mind is weak.

      Comment


      • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

        Fenugreek Stalkball Phleogena faginea

        These are like tiny cotton buds and tend to appear in colonies of many hundreds. The live on dead wood and these were on what had been the inner surface of a split log in mixed woodland.

        The name is from the scent of the herb fenugreek, of which it smells.

        I know we find them infrequently but I didn't realise it was 5 years since I last photographed them:

        https://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1335963/

        Olympus EM-1, (aperture priority), Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 macro, f8, hand-held.

        For closer views see the previous posting via the link.

        The feather-like growth is another, much more common woodland fungus.

        The stereos are crosseye

        Harold

















        The body is willing but the mind is weak.

        Comment


        • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

          Mark Johnson

          My Sailing Page

          My Flickr

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          • Mark Johnson

            My Sailing Page

            My Flickr

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            • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

              Originally posted by MJ224 View Post
              Sea Buckthorn
              One of my favourite plants.

              Harold
              The body is willing but the mind is weak.

              Comment


              • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

                Stropharia: How It Really Looks in Habitat

                It is customary to post images of individual mushrooms, or small groups of them, all obstructions to a clear view having been removed. Although I have removed a considerable amount of overlying, brown grass, these are still much as I found them.

                The stereo is crosseye.

                Olympus EM-1, (aperture priority), Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 macro, 1/60 at f9 ISO 800, hand-held.

                Harold



                The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                Comment


                • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

                  Originally posted by Harold Gough View Post
                  One of my favourite plants.
                  Yeah, but have you ever tried eating the berries? I did and I had to go to the casualty department to get my mouth unpuckered they were so sour!

                  Jim

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                  • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

                    Dingy Twiglet Simocybe centunculus

                    I found this on one of the rotting logs I leave in my garden for fungi, etc. to colonise. It didn't look quite like a species I had found before and had not been present in any of the several previous years that the log had been there.

                    The colour which I first noticed was the yellow, although the top of the cap had a lot of brown colour. The yellow is not mentioned in descriptions I have located but it soon turned to brown in the following days. There were two colonies, one browner than the other.

                    https://www.mushroomexpert.com/simoc...ntunculus.html

                    The stereos are crosseye.

                    Olympus EM-1 (manual mode), Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 macro, f9, f10, f11, twin flash hand-held.

                    Harold















                    The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                    Comment


                    • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

                      Tiny Ascomycete Fungus Dendryphion comosum

                      This forms an untidy fuzz on the stems of some perennials, in this case dead Goldenrod stems on the ground.

                      These are extremely tiny fruiting bodies, the highest magnification being of a FOV 3.5mm wide.

                      I suppose I should not assume that everyone knows about Goldenrod. The stem is about as thick as a pencil. (Remember those? )

                      This is the anamorph form of the fungus. It is the asexual form, which used to be called the Fungi Imperfecti. The Telomorph form is the sexual one, the familiar mushrooms or, in the case, possibly a small disc or cup. It seems that only the anamorph is known. Many species have been described under two names, one for each form.

                      Olympus EM-1 (manual mode), Olympus 4/3 x2 TC, Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 macro, f13, triple flash hand-held.

                      Olympus EM-1 (manual mode), Laowa 25mm f2.8 2.5x-5x ultra-macro at f11, twin TTL flash hand-held.

                      The stereo is crosseye.

                      Harold









                      The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                      Comment


                      • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

                        So delicate

                        Dave

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                        • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

                          Resupinatus trichotis the Hairy Oysterling

                          I found this yesterday on some very rotten wood on the ground in deciduous woodland. I looks very much like a species I have posted here before, R. applanatus. However, when the mature fruiting bodies* are viewed from an angle permitting to top of the cap to be seen, the crowded, the presence coarse blackish hairs shows the difference.

                          The largest are of about fingernail size.

                          This species has been recorded only about a hundred times in the UK. it seems that the database lacks good images so some of these will be donated.
                          These were photographed on my return home. Slugs have grazed on some parts.

                          Olympus EM-1 (manual mode), Olympus 4/3 x2 TC, Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 macro, f8 f11, twin flash hand-held.

                          Harold









                          The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                          Comment


                          • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

                            Bisporella citrina Lemon Disco Fungus

                            This is common on barkless rotten wood.

                            I have used lighting which is more dramatic thatnusual, first single flash then twin flash.

                            The stereos are crosseye.

                            Olympus EM-1 (manual mode), Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 macro, f11 ISO 800, flash hand-held.

                            Harold







                            The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                            Comment


                            • Mark Johnson

                              My Sailing Page

                              My Flickr

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                              • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

                                Thanks, Mark.

                                That was my prime purpose for the images.

                                Harold
                                The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                                Comment

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