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Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

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  • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

    Great eye detail.
    Stuff from Cuba
    More stuff from Cuba
    It all started here

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    • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

      Unexpected Barkfly

      Yesterday I was trying to stir up some of the mothflies in my compost bin. If I thump the side of the plastic bin it gets some of them airborne. One or two may settle on the rim, where photographic options are best. Most fly out and away.

      I saw where one of these went. I was one of the darker ones and it settlesdon the adjacent greenhouse glass at a handy height for some shots. Only when I got it framed and focused did I realise that it was my first ever winged psocopteran, a Barkfly.

      I got three images, I didn't shoot a stereo pair but a couple are enough to differentiate the insect a bit more from the background than any single frame. The green in the background and foreground is algae on the surface of the glass.

      EM-1, x2 TC (4/3) Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 at f11 (f22 effective), Raynox MSN-202 supplementary, twin flash, hand-held.

      The images have been cropped for composition. The stereo is crosseye.

      Harold



      The body is willing but the mind is weak.

      Comment


      • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

        Originally posted by alfbranch View Post
        Nice surprise.

        What is the working distance with that set up. I can understand the problems with angles mate.

        Can you show a shot of that rig.
        Here are all the details, which I have just posted elsewhere:

        This is the setup used on my EM-1 with the Raynox MSN 25 diopter supplementary on the 4/3 50mm f2 for extreme macro. It is shown with maximum extension of the lens to closest working distance, which normally gives FOV 35mm wide on m4/3. The x2 matched TC makes that 17.5mm and the Raynox makes that 5mm at a working distance of about 20mm.

        Using a x1.4 TC gives FOV ca 7mm and withough a TC FOV is 10mm. The working distance at a given magnification is the same without TC or with either.

        The components, from left to right:

        Olympus 4/3 adapter MMF-2*, Olympus Digital 4/3 2x Teleconverter EC-20, Olympus Digital 4/3 50mm f2 1:2 macro, adapter to attach MSN (37mm thread), Raynox MSN-202 macro converter (37mm rear thread).

        My recent macro shots in Macro World were taken with versions of this setup.

        I have not shown the camera or flash as the flash units, up to three, are all off camera, and this setup would also work with flash on the hot shoe (not my choice except when unavoidable).



        Harold
        The body is willing but the mind is weak.

        Comment


        • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

          Thanks Harold for the info on the 50mm do you have a shot of your flash set.

          Nice barkfly shots those are not easy to shoot but I have shot them several times.

          Barkfly by Alf Branch, on Flickr

          Loensia-fasciata-2 by Alf Branch, on Flickr

          Bark-Fly by Alf Branch, on Flickr
          OMD E-M1 OMD E-M5II MMF3 12-40 pro 12-50 EZ 14-42 EZ 9-18 f4.0 -5.6 40 -150f4-f5.6 R 60mm f2.8 macro Sigma 105 f2.8 macro Holga 60mm plastic Holga pinhole lens lens and a XZ-1 Olympus - 35 SP Trip 35 Pen EEs OM2sp

          I nice view does not mean a good photograph. My FLickr

          Comment


          • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

            Originally posted by alfbranch View Post
            Thanks Harold for the info on the 50mm do you have a shot of your flash set.

            Nice barkfly shots those are not easy to shoot but I have shot them several times.
            Alf,

            Thanks. I wouldn't know how difficult they are, never having had the opportunity before. You did a good job with them.

            I have no shots of my flash setup as it does not exist as such. I have an FL-36R on an L-bracket and a ball and socket joint. I also use at least one FL-300R, often held in my lens-supporting hand, mostly two, where I can, deployed on stands:

            http://www.harrisoncameras.co.uk/pd/...Fbgy0wod_MYKJw

            When it helps, on soft ground, I can elevate the 300Rs on monopods:

            http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/top...20/25#13284355

            An FL-LM2 on the hot shoe (light switched off in menu) controls them all.

            All units are diffused. I have a kit box on the 35R and a double layer of white rubber foam of the 300Rs.

            Springtail shots to come tomorrow.

            Harold
            The body is willing but the mind is weak.

            Comment


            • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

              Thanks for the info Harold it is interesting to find out how others work and hopefully learn something.

              Here are some shots from late November 2016. These were with my E-M5II 60 mm f2.8 and tubes plus Raynox and my usual Nissin Di466 flash


              Here is a tiny juvenile (I think) springtail



              ​​tiny springtail 1 by Alf Branch, on Flickr


              tiny springtail 2 by Alf Branch, on Flickr


              Here is a small spider


              Small spider by Alf Branch, on Flickr


              And finally a Mite


              Mite by Alf Branch, on Flickr
              OMD E-M1 OMD E-M5II MMF3 12-40 pro 12-50 EZ 14-42 EZ 9-18 f4.0 -5.6 40 -150f4-f5.6 R 60mm f2.8 macro Sigma 105 f2.8 macro Holga 60mm plastic Holga pinhole lens lens and a XZ-1 Olympus - 35 SP Trip 35 Pen EEs OM2sp

              I nice view does not mean a good photograph. My FLickr

              Comment


              • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                A couple more springtails


                Katiannidae by Alf Branch, on Flickr


                Stopped for a snack by Alf Branch, on Flickr
                OMD E-M1 OMD E-M5II MMF3 12-40 pro 12-50 EZ 14-42 EZ 9-18 f4.0 -5.6 40 -150f4-f5.6 R 60mm f2.8 macro Sigma 105 f2.8 macro Holga 60mm plastic Holga pinhole lens lens and a XZ-1 Olympus - 35 SP Trip 35 Pen EEs OM2sp

                I nice view does not mean a good photograph. My FLickr

                Comment


                • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                  Dicyrtoma fusca

                  This species is in a genus related to Dicyrtomina. Macroscopically, it lacks the black, zipper-like markings dorsally on the posterior of the abdomen and has more diffuse colouration.

                  Yesterday I was sorting some of the less inhabited (fungi,, insects, etc.) and, thus, burnable of the Sycamore logs which have been stacked on our front lawn for about two years. I was about to allocate one of the thicker ones to the fuel pile when I noticed small, purple/brown blobs. It was a colony of dicyrtomid springtails.

                  I know that Dicyrtomina saundersi lives under logs at the far extreme of our plot, under trees in the back garden. I had seen some in recent weeks but a hunt, earlier this week, for them was unsuccessful. I had wanted to try my latest combination of TC, Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 and Raynox MSN-202.

                  I had gone out to sort the logs before the forecast heavy rain, and the snow, arrived. So I had limited time.

                  The rounded surface of the logs makes low angle shots almost impossible. These globular species tend to stay still, unlike the high-speed entomobyids and isotomids. This helps in framing them but not with the angles. I put my two free standing flash units on small blocks of wood and move them to the best positions for a given shot.

                  After a while, any individual start walking and tracking them is a nightmare. You have to focus just ahead (horizontally and vertically) and anticipate with the shutter release, so that thyey move into focus as the flash fires.

                  I developed a cunning plan. These springtails tend not to follow contours but walk in straight lines, climbing up and over small obstacles. So I tracked these climbs and got some better images.

                  There were all sizes of individual present, up to about 2mm.

                  The images include some of my best of springtails but there is room for improvement. They have all been cropped to some extent from the original FOV of 5mm. The first one had a lot of the typical black detritus, amongst which this species chooses to live, so much of that has been cropped out.

                  EM-1 (manual setting), Olympus 4/3 x2TC, Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 macro at f10 (f20 effective), Raynox MSN-202 25 diopters, triple flash, hand-held.

                  Harold









                  The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                  Comment


                  • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                    Originally posted by alfbranch View Post
                    A couple more springtails.
                    Alf,

                    Very nice. We seem to be using about the same magnification.

                    Harold
                    The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                    Comment


                    • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                      Originally posted by Harold Gough View Post
                      Alf,

                      Very nice. We seem to be using about the same magnification.

                      Harold
                      you are using a bit more mag than me.

                      Here is a tiny mite with a springtail

                      Sprintail and tiny mite by Alf Branch, on Flickr
                      OMD E-M1 OMD E-M5II MMF3 12-40 pro 12-50 EZ 14-42 EZ 9-18 f4.0 -5.6 40 -150f4-f5.6 R 60mm f2.8 macro Sigma 105 f2.8 macro Holga 60mm plastic Holga pinhole lens lens and a XZ-1 Olympus - 35 SP Trip 35 Pen EEs OM2sp

                      I nice view does not mean a good photograph. My FLickr

                      Comment


                      • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                        Originally posted by alfbranch View Post
                        you are using a bit more mag than me.

                        Here is a tiny mite with a springtail
                        Dicyrtomina saundersi and a prostigmatid mite.

                        I was about to finish another session with D.fusca this morning when a very pale specimen turned out to be D. saundersi.

                        Harold
                        The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                        Comment


                        • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                          Linopodes motatorius Mite

                          This tiny, spindly, mite is often to be seen running rapidly around on rotten wood, tree bark,etc. It constantly waves its front legs around, using them much like antennae, mainly touching the substrate ahead of it. They are usually very difficult to photograph.

                          I was tracking a Dicyrtoma with my lens when two white legs entered the frame momentarily. The first image shows an adult, which looks just like the coloured illustration in the original description of L. motatorius. The other two show an immature, less-coloured individual. The pink blob, on the left, in the latter images is the rear, OOF, of the Dicytoma.

                          EM-1, x2 TC (4/3) Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 at f11 (f22 effective), Raynox MSN-202 supplementary, triple TTL off-camera flash, hand-held.

                          The FOV was 5mm wide, cropped to ca 4mm in the first image and a little less in the others.

                          Harold





                          The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                          Comment


                          • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                            Harold those Linopodes motatorius Mite shots are great.
                            OMD E-M1 OMD E-M5II MMF3 12-40 pro 12-50 EZ 14-42 EZ 9-18 f4.0 -5.6 40 -150f4-f5.6 R 60mm f2.8 macro Sigma 105 f2.8 macro Holga 60mm plastic Holga pinhole lens lens and a XZ-1 Olympus - 35 SP Trip 35 Pen EEs OM2sp

                            I nice view does not mean a good photograph. My FLickr

                            Comment


                            • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                              Originally posted by alfbranch View Post
                              Harold those Linopodes motatorius Mite shots are great.
                              Thanks, Alf.

                              A different kind of encounter, not necessarily the same species:

                              http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1387900

                              Harold
                              The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                              Comment


                              • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                                Dicytomina saundersi aka D. ornata

                                I though I had a situation where this species lived in my back garden whereas Dicyrtoma fusca was in the log pile in the front garden. Both species live upside down on the damp undersides of logs.

                                I have now found the occasional individual of this paler species in the front garden, among quite numerous D. fusca. This is the species with the zipper-like marking dorsally on the rear of its abdomen (first image).

                                Compared with the D.fusca, this species walked rather sedately, with its antennae nicely deployed.

                                These were shot with a FOV 5mm wide, cropped to ca 3mm and ca 4mm. The effective aperture was f22 (f11 set on the lens).

                                EM-1 (manual setting), Olympus 4/3 x2TC, Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 macro, Raynox MSN-202 25 diopters, triple flash, hand-held.

                                Harold



                                The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                                Comment

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