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  • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

    Four wonderful butterflies there Peter. I love the Marbled White. I was looking for White Admirals at Strumpshaw the other day but there was no sign of them yet in the usual place. Beautiful shots.

    Ron

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    • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

      Red Admiral on the buddleia shrub in the garden.
      It;s surprising how good the 40-150 kit lens is.


      Red Admiral Butterfly by Paul Silk, on Flickr
      Regards Paul.
      One day I hope to be the person my dogs think I am.

      https://www.flickr.com/photos/paul_silk/

      Comment


      • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

        Originally posted by OlyPaul View Post
        Red Admiral on the buddleia shrub in the garden.
        It;s surprising how good the 40-150 kit lens is.
        It is also the perfect focal length for butterflies.

        Nice shot, nice day, perfect.
        Peter (Art Frames)

        You can see some of my things on Flickr

        Comment


        • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

          Bug Nymphs Deraeocoris ruber.

          I saw the smallest of these (first three images) on a grass stem in my garden. It was static and feeding on an aphid. Subsequent sightings were of mobile ones, which walked fast and dodged around the opposite side of the leaf or stem when they saw me. They were on various plants. Later shots (last two images) were of sllghtly more mature individuals with wing buds.

          EM-1 (manual mode), Kiron 105, f16, twin flash, hand-held.

          Harold









          The body is willing but the mind is weak.

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          • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

            Tongue cum spear? Nice to see another new one to me.
            The picture tells the story, great when you have a bad memory.DW.

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            • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

              Originally posted by Imageryone View Post
              Tongue cum spear? Nice to see another new one to me.
              Piercing proboscis for extracting liquid content. This is one of the few mirids which do not suck the sap of plants.

              Harold
              The body is willing but the mind is weak.

              Comment


              • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                As a break from posting French butterflies, here is a rare and primitive insect from my trip to the Cevennes. First time I have seen them, but I am often in France later in the year. They are around april - july as adults.


                Ascalaphid
                by Peter Willmott, on Flickr


                Ascalaphid
                by Peter Willmott
                Peter (Art Frames)

                You can see some of my things on Flickr

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                • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                  That is a very fine looking insect Peter. Very interesting information too. The first shot is a real cracker.

                  Ron

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                  • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                    I saw quite a few Ringlets at Strumpshaw Fen the other day. I have had a soft spot for these butterflies ever since I was working in my mothers garden many years ago. I noticed lots of brown butterflies flying about but wasn't sure what they were. I found her butterfly book and happened to open the page at Ringlet. One of the butterflies promptly landed on the book next to its illustration. I think all butterflies should do this.

                    E-M1, 50-200 SWD and EC-14.







                    Ron

                    Comment


                    • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                      Originally posted by Olybirder View Post
                      I saw quite a few Ringlets at Strumpshaw Fen the other day. I have had a soft spot for these butterflies ever since I was working in my mothers garden many years ago. I noticed lots of brown butterflies flying about but wasn't sure what they were. I found her butterfly book and happened to open the page at Ringlet. One of the butterflies promptly landed on the book next to its illustration. I think all butterflies should do this.
                      Nice shots, Ron.

                      I get them resident in my garden each summer. Two moved in about a week ago.

                      Harold
                      The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                      Comment


                      • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                        Marbled White Melanargia galathea.

                        This grassland species is often to be found on chalk grasslands rich in wild flowers.The larvae feed on grass.

                        This one was in an orchid-rich meadow in sunlight. They are difficult to catch up with, as they rarely settle and fly up as you approach. Persistence pays off. These are daylight exposures.

                        EM-1 aperture priority, Kiron 105, hand-held.

                        Harold



                        The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                        Comment


                        • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                          Originally posted by art frames View Post
                          As a break from posting French butterflies, here is a rare and primitive insect from my trip to the Cevennes. First time I have seen them, but I am often in France later in the year. They are around april - july as adults.


                          Ascalaphids are sometimes called Owlflies, this is a male Sulphur Owlfly - Ascalaphus libelluloides coccajus in Cevennes, France.

                          Not a dragonfly, not even a fly, but a primitive insect from the lace-wing family akin to an ant-lion. It is an insect predator and is found in rough grassland, often at height, but is quite local and hard to find. The adults reach 25 millimetres of length, with a wingspan of 45–55 millimetres.

                          First time I have seen them although I was taken to a site a few years back by a local naturalist in another region of France, without any luck. having seen them I can understand their appeal as they are similar in size and character to a dragonfly (but a bit less direct).

                          I took many pictures but it is a challenge to get all of the appropriate bits in the shot and in focus...plus they are not happy to be stalked...!
                          Peter,

                          Stunning shots. They are very difficult to catch up with. This is the best I did, in northern Greece in 2012:

                          http://www.photomacrography.net/foru...ic.php?t=17340

                          (I have reworked these for reposting soon).

                          Harold
                          The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                          Comment


                          • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                            Originally posted by Harold Gough View Post
                            Peter,

                            Stunning shots. They are very difficult to catch up with. This is the best I did, in northern Greece in 2012:

                            http://www.photomacrography.net/foru...ic.php?t=17340

                            (I have reworked these for reposting soon).

                            Harold
                            Harold your is a different subspecies, judging by the wing pattern. As you said at the time it is not an easy one to keep up with when the temperature is high.

                            I saw a quick glimpse of one with blue wing colour but no shots.

                            Peter
                            Peter (Art Frames)

                            You can see some of my things on Flickr

                            Comment


                            • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                              Originally posted by Harold Gough View Post
                              Marbled White Melanargia galathea.

                              This grassland species is often to be found on chalk grasslands rich in wild flowers.The larvae feed on grass.

                              This one was in an orchid-rich meadow in sunlight. They are difficult to catch up with, as they rarely settle and fly up as you approach. Persistence pays off. These are daylight exposures.

                              EM-1 aperture priority, Kiron 105, hand-held.

                              Harold



                              Harold

                              One of my favourite grass butterflies. That all comes from one of my earliest memories of going on a family holiday to kent and arriving at a camp site with hundreds and hundreds of them. I'd never seen them before and haunted the tall grasses all holiday. They still seem magical and dreamlike today.

                              Getting a wing stretch pose is ideal but not always the way they settle. So nice shots.

                              Peter
                              Peter (Art Frames)

                              You can see some of my things on Flickr

                              Comment


                              • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                                Originally posted by Olybirder View Post
                                I saw quite a few Ringlets at Strumpshaw Fen the other day. I have had a soft spot for these butterflies ever since I was working in my mothers garden many years ago. I noticed lots of brown butterflies flying about but wasn't sure what they were. I found her butterfly book and happened to open the page at Ringlet. One of the butterflies promptly landed on the book next to its illustration. I think all butterflies should do this.

                                E-M1, 50-200 SWD and EC-14.







                                Ron
                                Ron lovely story and pictures.

                                I too have a fondness for ringlets, but mostly because they are happy to pose!

                                But your example of posing on the book is going the extra mile!
                                Peter (Art Frames)

                                You can see some of my things on Flickr

                                Comment

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