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After the pain, the gain

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  • After the pain, the gain

    Having damaged the nerves and muscles in my left shoulder building some new, waist height, flower and veg beds I've had to shoot one handed for a few days.

    Today one of the benefits of having built these beds came to fruition in that the bees and hoverflies have found it (and thank goodness my shoulder has improved a bit and I can at least fire a few frames using both hands on the camera )

    I've planted up some of the local butterflies favourite flowers so am waiting for them to appear but in the mean time I give you, my semi-trained hoverfly in flight (I tried to get it to face the camera but every time it did it shut its eyed and went all blurry, so you get a side view instead )

    hoverfly flight 60mm macro crop by Brian Wadie Photographer, on Flickr

  • #2
    Re: After the pain, the gain

    Stunning image! Commiserations on your shoulder, Brian - I also have a torn left shoulder ligament still in the healing phase since February, painful. Fortunately I can operate my XZs single-handed.
    My Flickr

    * mark * Wangaratta, Victoria, Australia **
    The OM-D E-M1 Mark II * OM-D M5 MkII * XZ2 * XZ1 * E3
    On post-processing: The camera kneads the dough, PP bakes the bread - Greenhill

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    • #3
      Re: After the pain, the gain

      That's a fabulous image, but you need to ask it to fly just a little lower next time so the wingtips are in the beige background
      John

      m4/3: E-P2, EM-5, 100-300, 14-42mm 12-50mm, 45mm, panny 14mm. 4/3: 7-14 + Flashes & tripods & stuff

      "Take nothing but pictures and leave nothing but footprints".

      Flickr gallery

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      • #4
        Re: After the pain, the gain

        Thanks Mark, yep its an uncomfortable experience made worse by the fact it was my own stupidity, I've wrecked that shoulder so many times that I know its weak but in the heat of the moment one forgets

        I've had a look through a few more and it did seem quite proud of its tail end:

        hoverflight tail shot by Brian Wadie Photographer, on Flickr

        hoveflight tail view by Brian Wadie Photographer, on Flickr

        (these re even bigger crops so the detail is going a bit)

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        • #5
          Re: After the pain, the gain

          but you need to ask it to fly just a little lower next time so the wingtips are in the beige background
          quite right John, I shall be having a few words with its agent but it is still quite early in the season and it doesn't respond to voice control too well yet

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          • #6
            Re: After the pain, the gain

            Two more well captured shots there Brian.

            Your left shoulder history is not unlike my own!
            My Flickr

            * mark * Wangaratta, Victoria, Australia **
            The OM-D E-M1 Mark II * OM-D M5 MkII * XZ2 * XZ1 * E3
            On post-processing: The camera kneads the dough, PP bakes the bread - Greenhill

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            • #7
              Re: After the pain, the gain

              It nearly got brave enough to face the camera but as you can see, its going out of focus as it shuts its eyes

              hoverflight three quarter view by Brian Wadie Photographer, on Flickr

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              • #8
                Re: After the pain, the gain

                Excellent image(s) Brian.

                I've been trying to train a Bee Fly to pose but it's having none of it, I'll keep at it while it sticks around.

                Which flowers have you planted to attract your butterflies?

                Dave

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                • #9
                  Re: After the pain, the gain

                  Thanks Dave, good luck with the Bee Fly, we've seen one this year and it didn't stop long enough for me to focus on it.

                  The new beds are in the spring transition at the moment so are mainly daffs, tulips and narcissi but I have put in a Bowles Mauve perpetual wallflower as the first of the Butterfly specific plants (but its also pretty good for Hovers and Bees, the Wool Carder bee in particular seems to like it). Later on we shall have some nasturtiums and a few other species, maybe a some of the smaller Penstemon which the Bees (honey and solitary bees) will spend hours feeding on. Stachys byzantina (Bunny's Ears) and Lychnis are good for attracting the female Wool Carder (who scour the "wool" off them for their nests) and Lychnis seems to be a universal attractants, so they will all find a spot.

                  I'll then let my "Gardener" loose and no doubt she will work her magic

                  Our garden is designed as a macro haven and attracts bees, bugs and butterflies most of the year round, these three shots will give you an idea. Its only a 40ft side square but is packed with plants that grow under severe lack of water (we haven't watered the main garden for over 14 years, only new plants until they are established and the few pots we have)

                  garden 7-13 by Brian Wadie Photographer, on Flickr

                  these are two of the four the raised beds I replaced

                  15-4-14 #2 by Brian Wadie Photographer, on Flickr

                  A similar viewpoint, later into summer

                  bare arch 19-6-14 by Brian Wadie Photographer, on Flickr

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