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On board the Vulcan bomber

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  • On board the Vulcan bomber

    If you've never seen inside a Vulcan, it comes as a real shock! No floor as such, just a hatch and ladders up to crew positions. Two pilots, captain on left; and three bomb aimers facing backwards, each with bomb aiming computers and radio gear. (The Bomb was to be dropped by terrain-matching radar, but could be dropped manually.) Also below the pilots, a prone manual bomb-aiming position that could accommodate two people at a crush. The toilet is shown by the arrow; a rubber bag with a screw top. Considering women went on these aircraft occasionally, one can only wonder what they did.....!

    You can make out the ladder and hatch to get in; the cockpit extends little further back than the bottom end of the ladder.
    [IMG][/IMG]

    The Pilot's (captain) seat:
    [IMG][/IMG]

    The manual bomb-aiming/passenger/observer position:
    [IMG][/IMG]

    The bomb aimer/plotter/navigator positions, seated on swivel chairs, looking backwards: (these positions are totally within the fuselage height, not in hte cockpit 'blister'.
    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]

    The toilet bag is just visible...
    [IMG][/IMG]

    The pilots each wore one eye=patch; when the Bomb exploded, it would blind them, so they had to keep one eye each working. Presumably the other three crew were expendable (and they didn't have ejector seats - it would have been very hard to get out, if at all) The cockpit windows are mica; glass would probably not survive the heat and blast.

  • #2
    Re: On board the Vulcan bomber

    Thanks for posting. Very cramped area when you consider the hrs they spent in there

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    • #3
      Re: On board the Vulcan bomber

      I'm constantly amazed by these Aircraft.

      Specifications were written in 1946 for a V bomber force and of the three designs built the Vulcan was the most radical design. We saw a display by one at Armed forces day 2014 in Scarborough and for such an old aircraft it has immense presence in the air.
      Too many cameras!
      E-500, E-510, EPM1, EPL5, EP3, EP5, OM-D E M10, OM-D E M5, Trip 35mm, Samsung WP10 and Panasonic G6 plus lots of lenses many manual focus.

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      • #4
        Re: On board the Vulcan bomber

        What an insight thanks for posting these Keith. Hope they can keep one flying for a bit longer.
        http://www.flickr.com/photos/flip_photo_flickr/

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        • #5
          Re: On board the Vulcan bomber

          Originally posted by byegad View Post
          I'm constantly amazed by these Aircraft.

          Specifications were written in 1946 for a V bomber force and of the three designs built the Vulcan was the most radical design. We saw a display by one at Armed forces day 2014 in Scarborough and for such an old aircraft it has immense presence in the air.
          Glad you enjoy, all.

          I think it is such a graceful aeroplane, so distinctive. Very noisy and polluting, unfortunately, but then it's from a time when that didn't matter. Hard to believe they started flying in IIRC 1952.

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          • #6
            Re: On board the Vulcan bomber

            The toilet could be interesting on a l-o-n-g flight, I'm thinking particularly of the raid on Stanley.
            Steve

            on flickr

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            • #7
              Re: On board the Vulcan bomber

              Originally posted by Ricoh View Post
              The toilet could be interesting on a l-o-n-g flight, I'm thinking particularly of the raid on Stanley.
              Yes, I thought that myself. Reminds me of when I was at school, one lad put his hand up: "Please Sir, I need the toilet!" The reply:"What would you prefer, an elastic band or a paper clip?" Perhaps the rubber bag expands...but it didn't look as if it did.

              The other thing is, they wouldn't be able to get up out of their seat, so far as I could see. I wonder if we have any ex-Vulcan crew on the forum who could enlighten us......

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              • #8
                Re: On board the Vulcan bomber

                One thing the designers calculated well was to give the crew every incentive not to be shot down!

                Fabulous coverage of what it's like inside a Vulcan, Keith.
                My Flickr

                * mark * Wangaratta, Victoria, Australia **
                The OM-D E-M1 Mark II * OM-D M5 MkII * XZ2 * XZ1 * E3
                On post-processing: The camera kneads the dough, PP bakes the bread - Greenhill

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                • #9
                  Re: On board the Vulcan bomber

                  Originally posted by KeithL View Post
                  ...The other thing is, they wouldn't be able to get up out of their seat, so far as I could see. I wonder if we have any ex-Vulcan crew on the forum who could enlighten us......
                  I was instructed by an ex Vulcan pilot, he didn't mention the toilet but spoke about the flying behaviour over a half pint at the bar, I got the impression it was a fairly easy bird to fly.

                  For anyone interested, 'Vulcan 607 by Rowland White' provides good insight into the Falklands bombing run. On all accounts, they got there and back by the 'skin of their teeth', and a large measure of good luck, for instance coming very close to running out of fuel when trying to locate in-flight refuelling.
                  Steve

                  on flickr

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                  • #10
                    Re: On board the Vulcan bomber

                    Great little detail that the windows are being made from mica (?Muscovite); I've never heard of this before. All very interesting, thanks a lot!
                    I am not afraid of Tits

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                    • #11
                      Re: On board the Vulcan bomber

                      Good and informative. Thanks.
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                      Learn something new every day

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                      • #12
                        Re: On board the Vulcan bomber

                        Excellent!

                        Is this the one at Coventry airport? Some friends and I were taken in to it a couple of years ago - the museum area's staffed by enthusiastic and knowledgeable volunteers, and they are really helpful.

                        I discovered shortly afterwards at a school reunion that one of my school friends had been a navigator on Vulcans: he later moved on to something else (that he clearly wasn't at liberty to discuss in detail ). Unfortunately I forgot to ask if he'd been on the Falklands mission - you wouldn't by any chance have a list of the names of the crew?
                        Regards,
                        Mark

                        ------------------------------
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                        Panasonic GM5, 12-32, 12-35, 15. Laowa 7.5.
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                        • #13
                          Re: On board the Vulcan bomber

                          Originally posted by drmarkf View Post
                          Excellent!

                          Is this the one at Coventry airport? Some friends and I were taken in to it a couple of years ago - the museum area's staffed by enthusiastic and knowledgeable volunteers, and they are really helpful.

                          I discovered shortly afterwards at a school reunion that one of my school friends had been a navigator on Vulcans: he later moved on to something else (that he clearly wasn't at liberty to discuss in detail ). Unfortunately I forgot to ask if he'd been on the Falklands mission - you wouldn't by any chance have a list of the names of the crew?
                          No Mark, it's at Newark Aviation Museum. I went on it as part of an organised tour. I should think the staff there would have quite a lot of information about it; as I remember it was flown there, but now isn't allowed to fly again.

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