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Out and about with Snaarman

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  • #16
    Re: Out and about with Snaarman

    No, just freckles.

    Other John

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    • #17
      Re: Out and about with Snaarman

      I was rather fortunate to find this old Sheep Scourer recently.

      Before mechanisation brought weaving to these shores, rural folks had to make their clothes from coarse materials matted together. They would use horse hair, cat fur and sheeps wool. Getting the wool off the sheep involved a scouring process where a wire entanglement was rubbed against the animal until a knot of wool was obtained.

      This would be straightened and matted to make a non woven fabric such as Fustian.




      People would make their own clothes out of anything available and the results were not exactly high fashion.

      So come market day, farmers wives would make their way into town and they would be very pleased to get felt by the yard.

      Pete
      Look, I'm an old man. I shouldn't be expected to put up with this.


      Pete's photoblog Misleading the public since 2010.

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      • #18
        Re: Out and about with Snaarman

        Originally posted by snaarman View Post
        ...So come market day, farmers wives would make their way into town and they would be very pleased to get felt by the yard.
        Pete
        Groan...

        Brilliant stuff though, keep em coming
        John

        m4/3: E-P2, EM-5, 100-300, 14-42mm 12-50mm, 45mm, panny 14mm. 4/3: 7-14 + Flashes & tripods & stuff

        "Take nothing but pictures and leave nothing but footprints".

        Flickr gallery

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        • #19
          Re: Out and about with Snaarman

          Some excellent agricultural equipment and history
          My Flickr

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          • #20
            Re: Out and about with Snaarman

            Now then. What about the lost art of Horse Training?

            Zodiac here has been trained to keep himself crouched in this position on the command "Stay" and will jump into action on the command "Kill"



            Guard Horses were quite common once upon a time. They would plough the fields by day and protect the farmyard by night, hiding in the shadows.

            This practice was particularly popular in the Scottish borders: Many a farm lad was caught out by the neighbours guard horse and ended up being kicked in the Trossachs.

            Pete
            Look, I'm an old man. I shouldn't be expected to put up with this.


            Pete's photoblog Misleading the public since 2010.

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            • #21
              Re: Out and about with Snaarman

              Now I must move on to the farmer's nightmare. The shame of short sheep.

              You see farmers are quite proud. They like to present their very best stock each quarter when it comes to market day. They are also not above criticising their neighbours in public.

              "Hey, Sharpey: Those your sheep? Bit short, aint they?"

              No one wants to have short sheep. They are really only good for the annual sheep strangling competition* No: Long Sheep are what is needed and a farmer will do whatever is required to get them.

              Here's the evidence. A home made Sheep stretcher from the 'fifties.



              Obviously the leather leg thongs have long since rotted away but you can see from the size of the springs that this implement means business.



              Three days with one of these and a man could have the longest sheep in the county, and look his neighbours in the eye.

              Pete

              *One of you knows all about this....
              Look, I'm an old man. I shouldn't be expected to put up with this.


              Pete's photoblog Misleading the public since 2010.

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Out and about with Snaarman

                The same process is used to lengthen piglets to create Baby back ribs with lots of meat between the rib bones.
                This space for rent

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                • #23
                  Re: Out and about with Snaarman

                  Fantastic Pete

                  Canny beat a long sheep
                  My Flickr Home Page

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                  • #24
                    Re: Out and about with Snaarman

                    Originally posted by snaarman View Post
                    .....
                    No one wants to have short sheep. They are really only good for the annual sheep strangling competition* ....
                    God yes, the highlight of the Border Shows, the sheep strangling

                    John

                    m4/3: E-P2, EM-5, 100-300, 14-42mm 12-50mm, 45mm, panny 14mm. 4/3: 7-14 + Flashes & tripods & stuff

                    "Take nothing but pictures and leave nothing but footprints".

                    Flickr gallery

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Out and about with Snaarman

                      Originally posted by snaarman View Post
                      Now I must move on to the farmer's nightmare. The shame of short sheep.

                      You see farmers are quite proud. They like to present their very best stock each quarter when it comes to market day. They are also not above criticising their neighbours in public.

                      "Hey, Sharpey: Those your sheep? Bit short, aint they?"

                      No one wants to have short sheep. They are really only good for the annual sheep strangling competition* No: Long Sheep are what is needed and a farmer will do whatever is required to get them.

                      Here's the evidence. A home made Sheep stretcher from the 'fifties.



                      Obviously the leather leg thongs have long since rotted away but you can see from the size of the springs that this implement means business.



                      Three days with one of these and a man could have the longest sheep in the county, and look his neighbours in the eye.

                      Pete

                      *One of you knows all about this....
                      We had those in Scotland in the 70's, my family tried them on me, but I only attained the lofty and somewhat dizzying height of 5'7".

                      The first image is actually springs, hence spring lamb's....... the text following the second image has a spelling mistake " and look his neighbours in the ewe"

                      Long sheep were in fact used for pipe cleaners in the tobacco and pipe industries well into the late 60's, when pink elephants and other mind controlling drugs were the order of the day..
                      Blackadder: "Allow me to be the first to offer Dr. Johnson my most sincere contrafibularities! I am anaspeptic, frasmotic, even compunctuous to have caused him such pericombobulation."

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                      • #26
                        Re: Out and about with Snaarman

                        These are fantastic, Pete. I am learning so much about English farming history
                        -----------
                        Cathrine

                        sigpic

                        My photoblog: http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/blog
                        My gallery: http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/

                        My book on Viovio

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                        • #27
                          Re: Out and about with Snaarman

                          Originally posted by Cathrine Spikkerud View Post
                          These are fantastic, Pete. I am learning so much about English farming history
                          Why thank you :-) I hope to get this material on to wikipedia soon...
                          Look, I'm an old man. I shouldn't be expected to put up with this.


                          Pete's photoblog Misleading the public since 2010.

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                          • #28
                            Re: Out and about with Snaarman

                            Pete, we are so impressed and waiting to see if you have "Sky Hooks" and "Turnip Turners" ; a "Swede Basher" ; fancy "Fag Hook" ; "Pig Poke"; Nuts Harvester" a "Mangel Wuurzel" and the very rare ... "Bale Turner"
                            .
                            .
                            [I].
                            .
                            I Lurve Walking in our Glorious Countryside; Photography;
                            Riding Ducati Motorbikes; Reading & Cooking ! ...


                            http://www.flickr.com/photos/photomagicf1_chevvy/sets/

                            the ONE photo album

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                            • #29
                              Re: Out and about with Snaarman

                              Originally posted by Chevvyf1 View Post
                              Pete, we are so impressed and waiting to see if you have "Sky Hooks" and "Turnip Turners" ; a "Swede Basher" ; fancy "Fag Hook" ; "Pig Poke"; Nuts Harvester" a "Mangel Wuurzel" and the very rare ... "Bale Turner"
                              Oh YES! As a Norwegian I would love to see the Swede basher!

                              Tordan would not agree, I suppose!
                              -----------
                              Cathrine

                              sigpic

                              My photoblog: http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/blog
                              My gallery: http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/

                              My book on Viovio

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                              • #30
                                Re: Out and about with Snaarman

                                Here is a splendid example of late Victorian design.

                                Product of the curiously named Dr Elias Goatbotherer, this is an 8 gang rat thrower. It was a boon to cereal producers in the 1890s.



                                All the carts are removed from the barn and the rat thrower is placed in the centre of the floor facing the large barn doors. Rats are naturally curious creatures and when presented with one of these iron contraptions they will certainly investigate. The eight powerful springs are cocked using a standard Growling Bar and each pressure plate has a small piece of cheese placed on it very carefully.

                                The farmer would then leave the barn door open and retire for the night, hoping to see all eight springs triggered in the morning.

                                As to the rats, no one knows what becomes of them.
                                Look, I'm an old man. I shouldn't be expected to put up with this.


                                Pete's photoblog Misleading the public since 2010.

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