Announcement

Collapse

December's CHALLENGE

The topic to inspire your creative juices this month is BOXES Please don't forget to vote on November's LEAVES challenge and please re-vote if you already did but before the recent forum upgrade.

See more
See less

Enjoying the 300 mm.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: Enjoying the 300 mm.

    Thanks, everyone for your kind comments!
    -----------
    Cathrine

    sigpic

    My photoblog: http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/blog
    My gallery: http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/

    My book on Viovio

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Enjoying the 300 mm.

      Originally posted by Cathrine Spikkerud View Post
      It cost my colleague and myself 1000 Aussie dollars to send our luggage back from Cairns last year, and that was without the 300... Next time I'm buying a tripod locally and giving it to someone when I go home. That's actually cheaper...

      Travelling on a dual purpose trip has its challenges. Last year I was saving space and brought a much too informal suit for the conference, I forgot that Melbourne is a black suit city Shorts and sandals were perfectly OK for Uluru, but a simple cream coloured suit is very out of place in Melbourne. And in the US I'm a speaker, so shorts and sandals are rather out of the question

      I have tried to convince the airline people that since I weigh a good twenty kilos less than the average male, I should have a higher cabin baggage allowance. They are so bad at maths...
      Depending upon what currency you were exchanging last year, 1000AUD this year will likely cost more as presently our dollar is trading at 0.3 cents over the USD.
      So leaving your tripod at home and learning to shoot without one will save you lots of Krone ... 1 Norwegian krone = 0.175863663 Australian dollars!
      My Flickr

      * mark * Wangaratta, Victoria, Australia **
      The OM-D E-M1 Mark II * OM-D M5 MkII * XZ2 * XZ1 * E3
      On post-processing: The camera kneads the dough, PP bakes the bread - Greenhill

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Enjoying the 300 mm.

        Originally posted by pandora View Post
        Depending upon what currency you were exchanging last year, 1000AUD this year will likely cost more as presently our dollar is trading at 0.3 cents over the USD.
        So leaving your tripod at home and learning to shoot without one will save you lots of Krone ... 1 Norwegian krone = 0.175863663 Australian dollars!
        Good thing it's the US this year, since it's cheaper! I think the 300 is staying behind. Keith has promised to take care of it for me!
        -----------
        Cathrine

        sigpic

        My photoblog: http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/blog
        My gallery: http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/

        My book on Viovio

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Enjoying the 300 mm.

          Your 50-200 results are impressive both with and without EC14, although hardly a fair comparison with the 70-300 sample of a different bird, strongly backlit.

          As you say, we all have differing ways of shooting and I have already conceded that my disappointing results may be due more to user incompetence than any lens shortcoming. So far I have used it only tentatively for landscapes without opportunity to use it on anything else.

          So - being a bright autumn Sunday it is as good an opportunity as I will get to give the 50-200 a more considered workout.

          And I am not promising anything!
          My Flickr

          * mark * Wangaratta, Victoria, Australia **
          The OM-D E-M1 Mark II * OM-D M5 MkII * XZ2 * XZ1 * E3
          On post-processing: The camera kneads the dough, PP bakes the bread - Greenhill

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Enjoying the 300 mm.

            Cracking shot Cathrine that is as much if not more to do with the photographer whatever the lens used.
            Regards Paul.
            One day I hope to be the person my dogs think I am.

            https://www.flickr.com/photos/paul_silk/

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Enjoying the 300 mm.

              Originally posted by OlyPaul View Post
              Cracking shot Cathrine that is as much if not more to do with the photographer whatever the lens used.
              That was what I meant by my initial post.

              If you follow a certain other 4/3 forum you'd get the impression the 300mm wasn't capable of such results. But it obviously is in the hands of a photographer who knows how to use it.
              It's the image that's important, not the tools used to make it.

              David M's Photoblog

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Enjoying the 300 mm.

                I'm flattered. I'm not strong enough (yet) to use it hand-held so it's on a tripod with a ball head with the screw loose. That way I have the support while still being able to move. This twig is very popular for landing on before proceeding to the seed holder.

                It'll be a different story using this for field-work! Hand held and on a boat... I shall bring the 50-200 and EC14 in case I tire. They are also splash-proof
                -----------
                Cathrine

                sigpic

                My photoblog: http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/blog
                My gallery: http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/

                My book on Viovio

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Enjoying the 300 mm.

                  Originally posted by pandora View Post
                  Your 50-200 results are impressive both with and without EC14, although hardly a fair comparison with the 70-300 sample of a different bird, strongly backlit.
                  You are absolutely right. A Black guillemot against a backlit sky is not a fair comparison!

                  Let me be clearer about the two lenses: I'm definately not saying the 70-300 is a bad lens!! It most certainly isn't!!

                  The combination 50-200 /EC14 gives a best f-stop of 4.9 at 283 mm compared to the 5.6 of the 70-300 @ 300 mm. For fieldwork on the Norwegian coast this is a margin I need, in better light it's not going to matter (luckier parts of the world ).

                  300 mm gives a better close-up than 283 mm. No argument!

                  The 50-200mm and the EC14 are both robust, splash and dust-proof. The 70-300 is far more delicate.

                  The combination 50-200 /EC14 (on my lens!) was a little less sharp at the bottom edge than the 70-300 in my experiment (note the bottom of the nest-box), but those pictures were taken last summer before my 50-200 was adjusted, and that could be the focus plane and difference in aperture! Example with a woodpecker:

                  70-300 mm @300 mm:


                  50-200/EC14 at 283mm.


                  In the middle, though, there is a little more detail in the 50-200/EC14-image, so I wait for the adult again to show up, and hope for similar lighting on it. Why on earth I managed to use 202 mm and not 300? Must have been because I was switching the two all the time...


                  All the above images have only been opened in Adobe RAW and converted without adding any changes other than technical labelling. Here's what I got out of the 70-300 mm lens with a little TLC in Photoshop, note - still no extra sharpening:



                  So, to conclude: The 70-300 and 50-200/EC14 are similar with respect to image quality, and I would have bought a 70-300 for myself as well, had it not been that I need the extra f-stop and I need splash-proof equipment. Also, I was only testing it to evaluate whether that extra reach was worth it, before I gave it to my Dad to enjoy. I didn't want to give Dad something that was rubbish! I didn't buy myself one, because we decided to buy the SHG 300 mm 2.8 lens at work.

                  The 70-300 is definately a lens I would recommend if lighting is good. It focuses a bit slower, but the converter can slow down the 50-200 as well. And when I bought it, the price was very reasonable! In my case there was no question of selling the 50-200...

                  In your case, Mark, I think you would enjoy buying another 70-300 instead of a converter. You have a lot of nice light down under!
                  -----------
                  Cathrine

                  sigpic

                  My photoblog: http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/blog
                  My gallery: http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/

                  My book on Viovio

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Enjoying the 300 mm.

                    Great Shots ! ALL !

                    Its not so much the lens, but the eyes and mind behind it, that captures the shot! I would wear my camera and big lens, many do! and I do use my clothes to pack my other kit! take a mono pod as a walking stick - you have to hand it to the Air steward (because you could use it as a weapon) and a pack away SLIK lightweight but sturdy tripod.
                    .
                    .
                    [I].
                    .
                    I Lurve Walking in our Glorious Countryside; Photography;
                    Riding Ducati Motorbikes; Reading & Cooking ! ...


                    http://www.flickr.com/photos/photomagicf1_chevvy/sets/

                    the ONE photo album

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Enjoying the 300 mm.

                      Cathrine, thank you - thank you for your time and technical expertise in putting together the above which will clarify the issue for any of us who are or have been pondering the optical merits of these two lenses.

                      On studying your samples closely, and before I had reached the bottom line, "In your case, Mark, I think you would enjoy buying another 70-300 instead of a converter. You have a lot of nice light down under! " I had already reached the same conclusion.

                      I think the comparitive images and your analyses are so illuminating that your thread (leaving pandora out) should be preserved here as a sticky.

                      So, if you have no objection Cathrine how's about it John (Zuiko)?
                      My Flickr

                      * mark * Wangaratta, Victoria, Australia **
                      The OM-D E-M1 Mark II * OM-D M5 MkII * XZ2 * XZ1 * E3
                      On post-processing: The camera kneads the dough, PP bakes the bread - Greenhill

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: Enjoying the 300 mm.

                        No objection

                        If you notice the final picture and think that there would have been much more detail if I'd had the lens at 300 mm ()
                        -----------
                        Cathrine

                        sigpic

                        My photoblog: http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/blog
                        My gallery: http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/

                        My book on Viovio

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: Enjoying the 300 mm.

                          Originally posted by Cathrine Spikkerud View Post
                          No objection

                          If you notice the final picture and think that there would have been much more detail if I'd had the lens at 300 mm ()
                          I did notice and study the final picture closely and yes, there should have been even more detail focused at 300mm.

                          I will bring your illuminating thread to John's attention.
                          My Flickr

                          * mark * Wangaratta, Victoria, Australia **
                          The OM-D E-M1 Mark II * OM-D M5 MkII * XZ2 * XZ1 * E3
                          On post-processing: The camera kneads the dough, PP bakes the bread - Greenhill

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: Enjoying the 300 mm.

                            Dear Cathrine,

                            How wonderful to see some images taken with your new 300mm lens. You already seem to be showing off its capabilities very nicely indeed. Looking forward to seeing some more, you must be delighted.

                            Cheers

                            Chris

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: Enjoying the 300 mm.

                              I am! There will be no privacy for the woodpecker this year!
                              -----------
                              Cathrine

                              sigpic

                              My photoblog: http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/blog
                              My gallery: http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/

                              My book on Viovio

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: Enjoying the 300 mm.

                                Originally posted by pandora View Post
                                Cathrine, thank you - thank you for your time and technical expertise in putting together the above which will clarify the issue for any of us who are or have been pondering the optical merits of these two lenses.

                                On studying your samples closely, and before I had reached the bottom line, "In your case, Mark, I think you would enjoy buying another 70-300 instead of a converter. You have a lot of nice light down under! " I had already reached the same conclusion.

                                I think the comparitive images and your analyses are so illuminating that your thread (leaving pandora out) should be preserved here as a sticky.

                                So, if you have no objection Cathrine how's about it John (Zuiko)?

                                Thread copied, condensed and made sticky under Telephoto section on the lens board. See:-
                                http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthre...767#post108767
                                John

                                "A hundredth of a second here, a hundredth of a second there � even if you put them end to end, they still only add up to one, two, perhaps three seconds, snatched from eternity." ~ Robert Doisneau

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X