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Half Life of digital cameras ?

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  • Half Life of digital cameras ?

    Depends on brands, but about 12-18 months is my estimation.
    Steve

    on flickr

  • #2
    Re: Half Life of digital cameras ?

    I think (excluding compacts) all my cameras have been at least that when I've brought them. None have had major failures, my G1 (built 2009) is still in use by my daughter, and the only issue with that is the SD card cover missing.

    There are factors like 'tin whiskers' in the solder that will almost certainly limit the operational life on modern electronics, & of course physical wear & tear on the shutters etc have to be taken into account but I gather the expectation there is 100k to 200k operations (I'm not sure either of these show the exponential decay pattern that results in a half life - a Gaussian distribution is more likely IMO)
    Mike
    Compulsive photographic Dabbler.
    Flickr

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    • #3
      Re: Half Life of digital cameras ?

      NASA conducted a number of experiments and found tin whiskers to be exacerbated by lead free, I think NPL found the same. Other issues with LF too such as potential for dry joints (which is process related). Certainly to sell into Europe LF is a requirement unless having a military waiver, but for manufactures selling World Wide there could be a temptation to use a mix of LF solder and lead tinned components that actually makes things worse, IIRC.

      What about half life in terms of value using MRP as t zero?
      Steve

      on flickr

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Half Life of digital cameras ?

        In my experience lead-free solder is a right pain. It doesn't flow the way traditional tin-lead does, so dry joints are much more likely. On the other hand with increasing integration of electronic circuits there are probably fewer soldered joints in modern products. It's usually the electro-mechanical components such as switches that fail first.
        Regards
        Richard

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Half Life of digital cameras ?

          Originally posted by Otto View Post
          In my experience lead-free solder is a right pain. It doesn't flow the way traditional tin-lead does, so dry joints are much more likely. On the other hand with increasing integration of electronic circuits there are probably fewer soldered joints in modern products.
          I won't use the stuff!

          Maplin don't sell leaded solders any more as they are considered 'toxic', but commercial suppliers such as RS Components and CPC still sell it.

          My personal preference is to use leaded solder with added silver; especially for audio equipment.
          ---------------

          Naughty Nigel


          Difficult is worth doing

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Half Life of digital cameras ?

            Originally posted by Ricoh View Post
            NASA conducted a number of experiments and found tin whiskers to be exacerbated by lead free, I think NPL found the same. Other issues with LF too such as potential for dry joints (which is process related). Certainly to sell into Europe LF is a requirement unless having a military waiver, but for manufactures selling World Wide there could be a temptation to use a mix of LF solder and lead tinned components that actually makes things worse, IIRC.

            What about half life in terms of value using MRP as t zero?
            I remember Hasselblad had to scrap one of its models because of leaded solder, and its possible effect on landfill at end of life.

            Clearly the EU mandarins concerned did not understand the issues or the product.
            ---------------

            Naughty Nigel


            Difficult is worth doing

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Half Life of digital cameras ?

              Originally posted by Ricoh View Post
              Depends on brands, but about 12-18 months is my estimation.
              I'm not sure what you mean - time between models or time in use in hands, if the latter all my digital cameras are all still in-use
              1. E500 - Bought in 2006, Still used under Land Rover, covered in Oil and Grease, the flash has to be prized open to use it but it still works
              2. E510 - Bought in 2007 goes caving, covered in Mud, Still works
              3. E30 - Bought in 2009 Was my prime camera until 3 weeks ago, now moving to backup and will probably go caving and drop down the others (once the 500 finally dies)
              4. EM1mk II - Bought 2 weeks ago. At that rate with an increasing longevity should last the rest of my mortal days
              My Kit (OK I'm a hoarder...)
              4/3 E500, E510, E30 + 35macro, 50macro, 7-14, 11-22, 14-45 (x2), 14-54, 40-150 (both types), 50-200, 70-300, 50-500,
              m 4/3 EM1MkII + 60 macro, 12-100 Pro
              FL20, FL36 x2 , FL50, cactus slaves etc.
              The Boss (Mrs Shenstone) E620, EM10-II, 14-41Ez, 40-150R, 9 cap and whatever she can nick from me when she wants it

              My places
              http://www.shenstone.me.uk
              http://landroverkaty.blogspot.com/
              https://vimeo.com/shenstone
              http://cardiffnaturalists.org.uk/

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Half Life of digital cameras ?

                My E1 still works as well as it did when I bought it in 2004. The E1 is clearly outclassed by today's offerings in terms of pixel count, but colour rendition is still better than most in my view.

                We also have Canon PowerShot G9 and G11 cameras as backups, and to 'grab' when the need arises. I'm not sure how old these are now, but their batteries still hold a good charge even when they haven't been used for a year or two.
                ---------------

                Naughty Nigel


                Difficult is worth doing

                Comment


                • #9
                  Steve

                  on flickr

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Half Life of digital cameras ?

                    Steve - I can see this is another of your digs at how awful modern digital cameras are

                    Now don't get defensive! I can sympathise with your concern over the short life of any consumer electronics device and more generally with modern society's propensity for junking stuff with alarming lack of concern for sustainability of the planet. However, within the parameters of how the modern world works, I don't think that digital cameras should be singled out for particular bashing.

                    The root problem is that technology advances and those advances are driven by commercial competition which in turn means that new models are always needed in order to:

                    1) Ensure the competition is outsmarted

                    2) Get people to buy the new gear to pay for the R&D to achieve objective (1)

                    Unless we as a society are happy to live with what we've got then I don't see this changing. Living sustainably is a major challenge for our species and it needs a complete inversion of our economic model - but that's a much bigger issue than the marketable half-life of a camera!
                    Paul
                    E-M1ii, Pen-F and too many lenses
                    flickr
                    Portfolio Site
                    Instagram

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Half Life of digital cameras ?

                      Unless it is a diesel, in which case terminal velocity can be multiplied by a factor of at least ten.
                      ---------------

                      Naughty Nigel


                      Difficult is worth doing

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Half Life of digital cameras ?

                        Oh, how perceptive of you Paul yes I'm thoroughly *issed-off with modern digital junk (that sounds good coming from a former electronics design engineer), but it's not the technology per se, or the gadgets, but the endless desire to spin the next model, like DAZ washing powder once was (new improved DAZ washes whiter than the muck we sold you last week ) driven for the reasons given. Anyway I'm gladly jumping off the bandwagon having lost a 'ton' of money on digital junk.
                        Steve

                        on flickr

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Half Life of digital cameras ?

                          Originally posted by pdk42 View Post
                          Steve - I can see this is another of your digs at how awful modern digital cameras are

                          Now don't get defensive! I can sympathise with your concern over the short life of any consumer electronics device and more generally with modern society's propensity for junking stuff with alarming lack of concern for sustainability of the planet. However, within the parameters of how the modern world works, I don't think that digital cameras should be singled out for particular bashing.

                          The root problem is that technology advances and those advances are driven by commercial competition which in turn means that new models are always needed in order to:

                          1) Ensure the competition is outsmarted

                          2) Get people to buy the new gear to pay for the R&D to achieve objective (1)

                          Unless we as a society are happy to live with what we've got then I don't see this changing. Living sustainably is a major challenge for our species and it needs a complete inversion of our economic model - but that's a much bigger issue than the marketable half-life of a camera!
                          Paul, you forgot to mention how 'the market' drip feeds us with new technology to keep us buying; and how clever marketing is used to make people feel inadequate, and that they are missing something in life if they do not (or cannot) buy the latest smartphone or whatever.

                          Cruelly, this seems to be aimed particularly at poorer members of society, to whom the latest iPhone (with accompanying extortionate tariff) has become essential to maintain their standing, (and who are presumably more gullible than most).

                          A lot of this can be explained by a phenomena known as 'proletarian drift', where the proletariat (the people) crave material goods associated with rich, famous and powerful individuals whom they worship and adore (i.e. footballers, film stars, and so forth).

                          One example quoted in the UK is the BMW 3 Series Vs. the Vauxhall Vectra. Many people bought the 3 Series believing that it marked them out as 'something special', whereas the Vectra was for 'ordinary people'. The result is that 3 Series cars outnumber the Vectras on the roads by many thousands, so who is 'special' now?

                          Personally I am very happy with what I have got, including a twenty year-old CRT television, and some audio equipment that is older than I am! Most of our lounge and dining room furniture is at least twenty-five years old, (some was from my parents), and I would be disappointed if we couldn't pass it on to our children.

                          Yet, whenever I visit the Council Tip I am always dismayed to see the amount of comparatively new furniture, flat screen televisions and other modern paraphernalia piled high in the skips.

                          So yes; I am very happy to use what I have. The problem is that modern technology is conspired to make itself obsolete even before the credit card bill has been paid.

                          Nikon scanner software anyone?
                          ---------------

                          Naughty Nigel


                          Difficult is worth doing

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Half Life of digital cameras ?

                            I stopped short of encouraging people to shoot film, at least until I've had my fill of all the lovely cheap cameras to be had out there. But once I'm topped up, it's green lights on hoping you guys will join me, that way seeing a drop in film price, and more D&P outlets across the UK.
                            Steve

                            on flickr

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Half Life of digital cameras ?

                              Originally posted by Ricoh View Post
                              I stopped short of encouraging people to shoot film, at least until I've had my fill of all the lovely cheap cameras to be had out there. But once I'm topped up, it's green lights on hoping you guys will join me, that way seeing a drop in film price, and more D&P outlets across the UK.
                              Too late; I've beaten you to it.

                              To date:

                              Olympus OM4Ti x 2 and OM2 Sp
                              Mamiya 645 Pro TL
                              Mamiya RZ76
                              Kodak Retina 1a (inherited),
                              and an ancient 5 x 4 plate camera.
                              ---------------

                              Naughty Nigel


                              Difficult is worth doing

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