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The Housing Crisis (social comment)

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  • #46
    Re: The Housing Crisis (social comment)

    Originally posted by Olybirder View Post
    I used to like the smell of coal tar too but I went off it. I suffer from psoriasis and the treatment involved coal tar bath emulsion and shampoo. I eventually gave up the bath emulsion as I got fed up with walking around smelling like a garden shed. The shampoo I used seems to have disappeared from sale too.

    Ron
    I like it!

    Shampoo: It has, for the same reason. But Pine Tar products haven't.

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    • #47
      Re: The Housing Crisis (social comment)

      Originally posted by KeithL View Post
      BUT! Coal tar and carbolic are not the same thing. Carbolic acid. Very powerful antiseptic. Hospitals used to reek of it; it would probably kill all htese MRSA and similar bugs stone dead still. You can't develop immunity to that like you can to antibiotics, methinks.
      That is very true. Hospitals used to reek of carbolic soap and antiseptic, so I doubt that any bugs would have survived that. Who ever heard of carbolic soap resistant bugs?

      (Mind you, we were always threatened with a carbolic soap mouthwash at school for uttering naughty words! )

      Hospitals also used to have highly polished brass door handles and kick plates; all of which were replaced at great cost with stainless steel fittings which didn't need to be polished.

      Then, about forty years later, a team of scientists realised that the copper ions in brass had a powerful biocidal effect. Maybe they should have asked a marine biologist They knew about these things well over 100 years ago!
      ---------------

      Naughty Nigel


      Difficult is worth doing

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      • #48
        Re: The Housing Crisis (social comment)

        Originally posted by Naughty Nigel View Post
        That is very true. Hospitals used to reek of carbolic soap and antiseptic, so I doubt that any bugs would have survived that. Who ever heard of carbolic soap resistant bugs?

        (Mind you, we were always threatened with a carbolic soap mouthwash at school for uttering naughty words! )

        Hospitals also used to have highly polished brass door handles and kick plates; all of which were replaced at great cost with stainless steel fittings which didn't need to be polished.

        Then, about forty years later, a team of scientists somebody realised that the copper ions in brass had a powerful biocidal effect. Maybe they should have asked a marine biologist They knew about these things well over 100 years ago!
        Another Classic *ock Up by "those in the know - NOT" Thanks for Sharing Nigel
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        [I].
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        I Lurve Walking in our Glorious Countryside; Photography;
        Riding Ducati Motorbikes; Reading & Cooking ! ...


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        the ONE photo album

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        • #49
          Re: The Housing Crisis (social comment)

          Originally posted by Naughty Nigel View Post
          That is very true. Hospitals used to reek of carbolic soap and antiseptic, so I doubt that any bugs would have survived that. Who ever heard of carbolic soap resistant bugs?

          (Mind you, we were always threatened with a carbolic soap mouthwash at school for uttering naughty words! )

          Hospitals also used to have highly polished brass door handles and kick plates; all of which were replaced at great cost with stainless steel fittings which didn't need to be polished.

          Then, about forty years later, a team of scientists realised that the copper ions in brass had a powerful biocidal effect. Maybe they should have asked a marine biologist They knew about these things well over 100 years ago!
          Couldn't agree more! Why did they use silver surgical instruments in the 18th century? Because they discovered that infection was much reduced! So what do they use now? Stainless Steel; and now they have to be sterilised...probably imperfectly.

          They stopped using carbolic acid when they discovered that it caused damage to skin of patients on the operating table. But they didn't stop using it to disinfect wards, equipment, etc, until probably the 1970s or 80s. I was surprised a few years ago to hear that Jeyes fluid had been banned. Also supposed to be injurious to health.

          Fine, ban these things from the home; but why not use them in hospitals and surgeries? Also factories (canteens, toilets) where you have a large concentration of people (well, we used to...), and the use of these chemicals can be controlled properly. I'm sure we would have less problems than we have now with infections.

          And what about food suppliers/manufacturers? Need I say it? Bird flu, E. coli, Legionnaires disease, etc. All could be much reduced with these powerful antiseptics.

          But I'm forgetting - we all are - common sense is in very short supply........

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