Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Using flash in landscapes

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Using flash in landscapes

    Just wondering if anyone can give any advice on the appropriate setting for the in camera flash when I want to use it to lighten the foreground in a landscape shot. I have had poor results so far when I would like to cast some light on the foreground to capture some detail resulting in the whole scene ending up darker than when taken without the flash.

    Any ideas welcome thanks

    Greg
    My Flickr Home Page

  • #2
    Re: Using flash in landscapes

    I'd suggest manual exposure mode and adjust the flash output to suit the main exposure. The in-camera flash may not be powerful enough to have much effect on all but the closest detail.
    John

    "A hundredth of a second here, a hundredth of a second there � even if you put them end to end, they still only add up to one, two, perhaps three seconds, snatched from eternity." ~ Robert Doisneau

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Using flash in landscapes

      Try using the camera on manual and meter for the scene, that way the camera isn't trying to balance things.

      Dave

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Using flash in landscapes

        I don`t think the built-in flash is powerful enough for what you are trying to acheive!

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Using flash in landscapes

          I dont think the built in flash will do what you need, you'll need an external flash and move it off camera to focus on the area needed
          E-M10 Mk2 - 14-42mm EZ - 40-150mm ED - Falcon 8mm Fisheye - FL-36R

          Wedding Photography Wales | Commercial Photography | Party Photographer Cardiff | Cheap Business Cards | Photoshop Training Cardiff

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Using flash in landscapes

            Thanks for the replies. Moving to manual That remains the dark side for me - most shots are in aperture or shutter priority, I feel safe there

            I was looking for a way of using the flash just to lighten the immediate foreground as I would usually have a rock or a tussock of grass there to provide some interest. Most often when I have a nice sky that I am capturing then the detail in the foreground gets lost and ends up as a silhouette. I mostly use the sigma 10-20 so get very close to the foreground subject so with just a little pop of flash I might get the detail I want ? When I have tried to use the flash everything in the captured frame goes dark.
            My Flickr Home Page

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Using flash in landscapes

              Originally posted by gregles View Post
              Thanks for the replies. Moving to manual That remains the dark side for me - most shots are in aperture or shutter priority, I feel safe there

              I was looking for a way of using the flash just to lighten the immediate foreground as I would usually have a rock or a tussock of grass there to provide some interest. Most often when I have a nice sky that I am capturing then the detail in the foreground gets lost and ends up as a silhouette. I mostly use the sigma 10-20 so get very close to the foreground subject so with just a little pop of flash I might get the detail I want ? When I have tried to use the flash everything in the captured frame goes dark.
              When you use the flash with the camera in auto mode the camera bases the exposure on the flash output, which is fine if you are taking a picture of a person at close range.

              However, for what you are trying to achieve manual exposure really is the best method - and it needn't be scary! When I started that's all there was! Just set the aperture as you would in 'A' mode, then turn the shutter speed dial untill the centre point on the exposure indicator bar is reached. With a simple twist of the dial you've done what the camera would normally have done for you, and this will not be changed in any way by the flash firing.

              However, the built-in flash is another problem. Firstly, it's doubtfull if it has enough power to achieve what you want. Secondly, it probably only has coverage for a 14mm focal length and if you are shooting at 10mm objects near the bottom of the frame won't be illuminated anyway. Even if they were covered, the lens would be between them and the flash unit, casting them into shadow, if you are very close.

              So off-camera flash is the solution. Don't worry if you haven't got an FL36 or FL50, a cheap non-dedicated manual gun will do fine. Fit a slave trigger unit to the flash gun's hot shoe socket and trigger by firing the camera's built-in flash. You'll have to get the correct exposure from the flash by trial and error, by moving it nearer to or further from the object you wish to illuminate, but feedback on a DSLR is immediate and a few practice frames costs nothing. There is a way of calculating the flash to subject distance, but I won't scare you with that!

              A better solution however, if you are trying to balance foreground exposure to a bright sky is to use a graduated ND filter - but these work best with manual exposure too!

              Hope this helps.
              John

              "A hundredth of a second here, a hundredth of a second there � even if you put them end to end, they still only add up to one, two, perhaps three seconds, snatched from eternity." ~ Robert Doisneau

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Using flash in landscapes

                you can get round some of the issues you mention my operating the camera upside down (most tripods will handle this).

                manual camera exposure control is a must IMO - and easiest
                E, Pen and OM-D bodies
                43 m43 and legacy glass
                loads of flashes and accessories from all the systems

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Using flash in landscapes

                  You could also try using a touch and light the area you want and then play with shutter speeds to get the effect you want, Painting with light can also work great in the later hours of the day.
                  E-M10 Mk2 - 14-42mm EZ - 40-150mm ED - Falcon 8mm Fisheye - FL-36R

                  Wedding Photography Wales | Commercial Photography | Party Photographer Cardiff | Cheap Business Cards | Photoshop Training Cardiff

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Using flash in landscapes

                    Thanks very much for the replies. I need to take some time to digest the information you have provided and have a play about with settings, a torch and camera positions. I have been considering getting an external flash and have been having a look at the older t20 and t32 units which come in at quite reasonable prices

                    Just wish there was someone closer who could show me how to.....

                    I will of course have a go and let you know how I get on

                    Thanks again

                    Greg
                    My Flickr Home Page

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Using flash in landscapes

                      Hi Greg, at the risk of being dumbed down by traditionalists, perfectionists and other "ists", might I suggest 'photoshopping' your shot on a computer.
                      Bob


                      To see what is in front of one's nose requires constant struggle.
                      GEORGE ORWELL

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X