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  • Filters

    Hi there,

    I have had my E-500 for a while now and would like to start experimenting with filters.

    I have been advised to get a UV protection filter and possibly a CPL filter. I enjoy photgraphing landscapes (water) and nature.

    How do these filters attach to lenses?

    I have Olympus 17.5-45mm and 40-200mm lenses. Do I need to get adapters to attach them?

    The filters I have seen are female thread.

    Thanks on advance.

    Eve

  • #2
    Re: Filters

    Originally posted by evejames View Post
    Hi there,

    I have had my E-500 for a while now and would like to start experimenting with filters.

    I have been advised to get a UV protection filter and possibly a CPL filter. I enjoy photgraphing landscapes (water) and nature.

    How do these filters attach to lenses?

    I have Olympus 17.5-45mm and 40-200mm lenses. Do I need to get adapters to attach them?

    The filters I have seen are female thread.

    Thanks on advance.

    Eve
    First of all Welcome

    The E-500 is ideal for Landscapes as the sensor is very good at rendering the colours of nature.

    The 17.5 - 45 lens has a filter size of 52mm

    http://www.olympus.co.uk/consumer/ds...ifications.htm

    The 40 - 150 has a 58mm filter size

    http://www.olympus.co.uk/consumer/ds...ifications.htm

    The filters are screw in types and you do not need any adaptors.

    I always have a "Protector" filter on the front of my lenses (it's a lot cheaper to replace than the cost of a scratched front element...

    A Circular Polariser can cause some strange exposures and may not give you the effect you want. I only use standard polarisers.

    As you have two different size filters you may want to consider the Cokin or Lee system that provides for use of the same square filters with different size lenses (via adaptors) that way you can experiment with graduated filters ot control the sky on your landscapes.

    As with all filters, you need to keep the effects subtle (unless you are going for Graphic or Freakish)

    If you have an old fasioned High Street Photographic shop simply go in there and ask to see what filters do what. Good shops often have a box of secondhand filters for you to try out. The other really good place to look out for is a "Camera Fair" but alas these are as rare as film photographers.

    Whatever you do have fun doing it and post some images to show us how you get on.

    Graham

    We often repeat the mistakes we most enjoy...

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Filters

      Hi

      I agree with Graham that a square filter system is a good way to go for landscape work and it will fit both lenses with simple adaptors.

      A UV filter screwed to your lens is also a good idea for protection and it is work buying a good multicoated one.

      I disagree with his comment on polarising filters though as circular polarisers are the recomended ones for modern cameras as the linear type can affect the auto focus and metering systems.

      Dave

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      • #4
        Re: Filters

        I agree with Dave that modern exposure and focussing systems that use a semi-silvered mirror will only work reliably with a circular polariser.

        I wonder if the Panasonic G1 will work with my old linear polarisers from my OM days?

        Anybody want to lend me a G1 to test this theory?

        ps Also need to borrow the m4/3 to 4/3 Panasonic adapter which I believe is hewn from solid unobtainium

        Rod

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Filters

          Originally posted by dbutch View Post
          ...I disagree with his comment on polarising filters though as circular polarisers are the recomended ones for modern cameras as the linear type can affect the auto focus and metering systems.

          Dave
          Originally posted by Rod Souter View Post
          I agree with Dave that modern exposure and focussing systems that use a semi-silvered mirror will only work reliably with a circular polariser.
          Rod
          That's why one of the best filter systems to go for is the "Cokin" style. That way you do all the Focusing with the filters out, then simply slip them in to get the effects you want. Metering is always "off" no matter if you have CPF or LPF, which is why we shoot RAW and Bracket and have histograms available to us.

          I would also suggest popping along to a local camera club. Most are only to happy to spend time going through all this and more...

          Graham

          We often repeat the mistakes we most enjoy...

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Filters

            Personnally I don't like the faff of Cokin-type filters. I have tried them on numerous ocassions and never got on with them (I used the Hoya system about 20 years ago in film days).
            I always preferred screw in ones but only really used a polariser. I find with digital that skies often naturally polarise themselves therefore I don't even use one of these anymore.
            If there is one filter that I should use more often (I am lazy really) is a grey grad to minimise blown-out skies. But lately I have been using the ISO bracketing on my E-3 which gives a good result although obviously needs a bit more work to get a good effect. A similar effect can be achieved from a single RAW file although I prefer ISO bracketing.
            As for Skylight or UV filters for protection I seldom use these although I KNOW that I should considering all my digital Zuikos are HG..............
            I find lens hoods (which I always use, even the huge one on the 50-200) offer good protection at zero extra cost.
            Dave

            E-M1 Mk2, Pen F, HLD-9, 17, 25, 45, 60 macro, 12-40 Pro, 40-150 Pro, 12-50, 40-150, 75-300, MC-14, MMF-3 (all micro 4/3rds), 7-14 (4/3rds), 50, 135 (OM), GoPro Hero 3, Novo/Giottos/ Manfrotto supports. Lowepro, Tamrac, Manfrotto, and Billingham bags.

            External Competition Secretary, Cwmbran PS & Welsh Photographic Federation Judge

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Filters

              Whatever filter system you buy into, make sure they are high quality. I learned the hard was many years ago; putting cheap filters over my lovely OM Zuiko's reduced sharpness and contrast quite noticably in some instances.

              I only use UV and C-POL filters now, and (for my digital gear) they are all Hoya Pro-1 filters. My film gear uses genuine Olympus filters.

              Interestingly, I have found I only need a C-POL filter with my digital lenses when I need to reduce reflections. The saturation seems fine without one!

              Cheers, Steve.
              visit my website www.photoark.co.uk

              Comment

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