Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Dust!!!!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Dust!!!!

    Would you look at the dust bunnies in this:



    Obviously dependant on which lens/aperture, this is with the 60mm macro, many of them are the same with the 75mm so it's not some muck in the lens. It makes me wonder if the sensor cleaning is broken.
    John

    m4/3: E-P2, EM-5, 100-300, 14-42mm 12-50mm, 45mm, panny 14mm. 4/3: 7-14 + Flashes & tripods & stuff

    "Take nothing but pictures and leave nothing but footprints".

    Flickr gallery

  • #2
    Re: Dust!

    Maybe you can clean the sensor yourself. I did with a special tool kit on my Pentax Ist years ago...

    Was simple and I think effective.................
    Mark Johnson

    My Sailing Page

    My Flickr

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Dust!

      If I had an old Pentax I'd give it a go. I successfully cleaned my mates Canon 1D years ago, but neither of those have a sensor held in place by 5-axis stabilisation! It's over 3 years old, I think I'll send it off to Luton Cameras for a check up & service. They did my Mk1 and it came back transformed.
      John

      m4/3: E-P2, EM-5, 100-300, 14-42mm 12-50mm, 45mm, panny 14mm. 4/3: 7-14 + Flashes & tripods & stuff

      "Take nothing but pictures and leave nothing but footprints".

      Flickr gallery

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Dust!

        F/16 shot against a homogeneous background, defocussed, is the way I check for sensor contamination. The Oly is good for cleaning anything that can shake clear, but sticky stuff is a different order of challenge.
        5-axis or not 5-axis, a wet clean using a suitable sensor cleaning product should be risk free.
        Steve

        on flickr

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Dust!

          I often hear people claiming that the Olympus SSWF is so good that they never need to clean their sensor, even after years of use. That's not my experience at all. I find that although Olympus cameras do better than some other makes, sensor dirt will everyday rear its head and a wet clean will be needed.

          In fact, I'm not even sure if it's the SSWF that makes Olympus cameras less susceptible to dirt, or whether it's a question of the effects being less noticeable due to the relatively thick sensor stack combined with the fact that we usually shoot our lenses at apertures of f5.6 or wider.

          Cleaning Olympus sensors isn't, IMHO, something that needs professional outsourcing. I've cleaned all of my cameras since I first got into digital photography, including all my m43 Olympus gear, and am yet to have any negative side effects from doing so.
          Paul
          E-M1ii, Pen-F and too many lenses
          flickr
          Portfolio Site
          Instagram

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Dust!

            Ok, cheers, I'll give it a shot. Do you guys have any recommendations as to the equipment?
            John

            m4/3: E-P2, EM-5, 100-300, 14-42mm 12-50mm, 45mm, panny 14mm. 4/3: 7-14 + Flashes & tripods & stuff

            "Take nothing but pictures and leave nothing but footprints".

            Flickr gallery

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Dust!

              Originally posted by jdal View Post
              If I had an old Pentax I'd give it a go. I
              I don't have an old Ist, I cleaned it 15 years ago..........................

              But what has changed since then?? A sensor clean is a sensor clean. Sponge and the appropriate cleaning fluid. Still like cleaning your windscreen properly.

              Hey ho, you local camera shop will do the job for a fee........................
              Mark Johnson

              My Sailing Page

              My Flickr

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Dust!

                Originally posted by MJ224 View Post
                I
                But what has changed since then?? A sensor clean is a sensor clean. Sponge and the appropriate cleaning fluid.
                An immovable sensor vs a sensor mounted in a very precisely engineered moveable mount is what.
                John

                m4/3: E-P2, EM-5, 100-300, 14-42mm 12-50mm, 45mm, panny 14mm. 4/3: 7-14 + Flashes & tripods & stuff

                "Take nothing but pictures and leave nothing but footprints".

                Flickr gallery

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Dust!

                  Originally posted by jdal View Post
                  An immovable sensor vs a sensor mounted in a very precisely engineered moveable mount is what.
                  Sorry don't want to be argumentative..................

                  You would be cleaning the sensor, not the machinery behind it!!

                  But if you want certainty, go to a photo shop
                  Mark Johnson

                  My Sailing Page

                  My Flickr

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Dust!

                    Originally posted by jdal View Post
                    Ok, cheers, I'll give it a shot. Do you guys have any recommendations as to the equipment?
                    This is what I do:

                    Ingredients:

                    - SensorSwab Type 2 swabs. They're 17mm across so will fit the width of m43 just fine (m43 is 17.3mm x 21.6mm).

                    - Eclipse cleaning fluid. It's basically purified methanol (so will evaporate quickly and will leave no residue).

                    Before shot:

                    - Take a shot of a plain white surface with the lens defocused and at f16 or f22. Take a look - you'll be horrified at the gunk you'll see (but remember this is a worst-case scenario, you'll never see it this bad in real shots).

                    Cleaning:

                    - I put the camera on its back and ensure it's turned off. I think turned off is better for two reasons - (a) you won't be fighting the IBIS; and (b) there is no risk of you inadvertently pressing the shutter release. If the shutter fires whilst there is an obstruction in the way, you'll wreck the shutter. I've heard others say that you should leave the camera on since the IBIS will stop the sensor from moving. This may be true (but I've never tried), but I can't help feeling that the forces you can apply with a cleaning pad are likely to significantly exceed what might occur due to camera movement.

                    - Prepare the swab as per the instructions (a few drops of fluid - enough, but not too much).

                    - Carefully put the swab at the top of the sensor and with it inclined at a slightly acute angle towards the bottom of the sensor (say about 70 degrees to the vertical).

                    - Carefully swipe the sensor from top to bottom, being careful not to put too much pressure on it. I generally find that the sensor will not move if you're gentle enough.

                    - When you get to the bottom, tilt the swab back such that it's now at an acute angle towards the top of the sensor.

                    - Carefully swipe back to the top of the sensor.

                    - At the top, remove the swab.

                    - Wait for any fluid to evaporate (methanol is very volatile so it should evaporate almost instantly).

                    After shot


                    Repeat the test shot again. You should find it a lot better. I doubt it'll be 100% perfect. Some remaining spots are normal but if any big ones remain, then repeat the cleaning. I sometimes re-use the same swab, but if you're paranoid you'll get a new swab for each swipe.

                    Hope that helps!
                    Paul
                    E-M1ii, Pen-F and too many lenses
                    flickr
                    Portfolio Site
                    Instagram

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Dust!

                      I read some advice to get fresh Eclipse; apparently over time the alcohol degrades the plastic bottle potentially resulting in desolved plastic in solution. When the alcohol evaporates the plastic stuff remains leaving a white film on whatever it is you clean, lens or sensor.
                      How true I'm not sure. I'm not a chemist.
                      Steve

                      on flickr

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Dust!

                        Originally posted by MJ224 View Post
                        Sorry don't want to be argumentative..................

                        You would be cleaning the sensor, not the machinery behind it!!

                        But if you want certainty, go to a photo shop
                        It was the force you use when cleaning that I was worried about, you are putting some pressure on the sensor, both sideways and "vertically" which is being absorbed by the IBIS mounting. But since others have managed ok, clearly this isn't an issue.
                        John

                        m4/3: E-P2, EM-5, 100-300, 14-42mm 12-50mm, 45mm, panny 14mm. 4/3: 7-14 + Flashes & tripods & stuff

                        "Take nothing but pictures and leave nothing but footprints".

                        Flickr gallery

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Dust!



                          Came with a shaped sponge on a stick, and instructions.

                          Was easy to do, with care and caution as Paul has explained.........Good luck..
                          Mark Johnson

                          My Sailing Page

                          My Flickr

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Dust!

                            Originally posted by Ricoh View Post
                            I read some advice to get fresh Eclipse; apparently over time the alcohol degrades the plastic bottle potentially resulting in desolved plastic in solution. When the alcohol evaporates the plastic stuff remains leaving a white film on whatever it is you clean, lens or sensor.
                            How true I'm not sure. I'm not a chemist.
                            I'd not heard that. A quick bit of Googling reveals little, although I did find an abstract of some research in using methanol to de-polymerise PET (which is the most commonly-used plastic for bottles). This is what it said:

                            The degradation of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) in supercritical methanol was investigated with the aim of developing a process for chemical recycling of waste plastics. A batch reactor was used at temperatures of 573–623 K under an estimated pressure of 20 MPa for a reaction time of 2–120 min. PET was decomposed to its monomers, dimethyl terephthalate and ethylene glycol, by methanolysis in supercritical methanol. The reaction products were analysed using size-exclusion chromatography, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, and reversed-phase liquid chromatography. The molecular weight distribution of the products was obtained as a function of reaction time. The yields of monomer components of the decomposition products including by-products were measured. Continuous kinetics analysis was performed on the experimental data.
                            But - that's a reaction at 20,000 atmospheres of pressure and 300 degrees C!

                            I doubt there's much in the claim that PET will dissolve in methanol at STP.
                            Paul
                            E-M1ii, Pen-F and too many lenses
                            flickr
                            Portfolio Site
                            Instagram

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              John

                              m4/3: E-P2, EM-5, 100-300, 14-42mm 12-50mm, 45mm, panny 14mm. 4/3: 7-14 + Flashes & tripods & stuff

                              "Take nothing but pictures and leave nothing but footprints".

                              Flickr gallery

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X