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Advice on lenses

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  • Advice on lenses


  • #2
    Re: Advice on lenses

    I have the 12-50 (which was a kit lens) and the 12-40 pro. The 12-50 is a pretty good lens and I often use it on a Pen F as it is small and light. The 40-150 is great value for money and again capable of very good results. The 9-18 isn't bad. I had a 7-14 pro for a while, lovely lens, but it was so big and heavy that I sold it and stuck with the 9-18 which is a great travel lens.

    If you are working indoors or in poor light the 12-40 is a much better bet than the 12-50 so it depends on what you envisage doing. Its reputation is well deserved.
    Steve
    My Flickr: https://flic.kr/ps/HRVVS

    "If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something" - Steven Wright

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    • #3
      Re: Advice on lenses

      I'd go for the 12-100 and sell the 12-50 and 40-150 although they wont make much of a dent in the 12-100 price I'm afraid. The 70-300 will work ok but the focussing misses will frustrate you in time I'm sure.
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/flip_photo_flickr/

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      • #4
        Mark Johnson

        My Sailing Page

        My Flickr

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        • #5
          Re: Advice on lenses

          Originally posted by Phill D View Post
          I'd go for the 12-100 and sell the 12-50 and 40-150 although they wont make much of a dent in the 12-100 price I'm afraid. The 70-300 will work ok but the focussing misses will frustrate you in time I'm sure.
          +1 for the 12-100 I just recently bought one second hand on this site and I love it.
          Tracey Jones

          Its a shame that humans dont come with autofocus, like cameras do!

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          • #6
            Re: Advice on lenses

            Thank you for the above three replies.
            I don't do much indoor or low light work as I live in Spain and it is always sunny
            I will look into maybe the 12-100mm and possibly the 9-18mm.
            Thanks guys.

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            • #7
              Re: Advice on lenses

              I just bought a used E-M1 so I could use my FT 12-60 SWD and 50-200 SWD which don't focus well on my E-M5. It was cheaper than buying the pro mFT equivalent lenses! The IQ seems a lot better than the 12-50 and 40-150 mFT lenses though I haven't done any scientific comparisons yet.
              Regards
              Richard

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              • #8
                Re: Advice on lenses

                Originally posted by Otto View Post
                I just bought a used E-M1 so I could use my FT 12-60 SWD and 50-200 SWD which don't focus well on my E-M5. It was cheaper than buying the pro mFT equivalent lenses! The IQ seems a lot better than the 12-50 and 40-150 mFT lenses though I haven't done any scientific comparisons yet.
                I was recommended to buy the E-M1 so to be able to use ft lenses with the adaptor, I have played around with my 50mm f2 prime lens using the adaptor and it seems to focus quickly as it did on my E510.

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                • #9
                  Re: Advice on lenses

                  Likewise - the E-M1 has both PDAF focussing as used on the original FT system, and CDAF used on mFT. My FT lenses seem to focus just as well on the M1 as they did on my old E-620. The E-M1 is the only Olympus mFT body to have PDAF.
                  Regards
                  Richard

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                  • #10
                    Re: Advice on lenses

                    You have a good range of lenses to cover all the well used focal lengths; the only lack being the less well used ultra wides. I would stick with what you have for the moment to see what upsets you the most. It might be size, weight, balance, speed of focus, changing lenses, or just plain old image quality. That way you can spend your pennies wisely on where it most counts. The 12-40 PRO is a stellar lens but does not suit everyone because of its limited zoom range which is why some people prefer the 12-100 PRO. If you find that you are happy with the range of the 12-50mm then this may inform your decision at some time in the future. Look at the pictures you are taking and decide if they are limited by your equipment (including ergonomics, lack of light, lack of reach or angle of view).
                    Cameras: E-M5, E-PM2, OM40, OM4Ti
                    Lenses (M.Zuiko Digital): 7-14mm/F2.8, 12-40mm/F2.8, 40-150mm/F2.8+TC1.4x, 12-50mm/F3.5-6.3, 14-42mm/F3.5-5.6 EZ, M.ZD 40-150 F4-5.6 R, 75-300mm/F4.8-6.7 Mk1, 12mm/F2, 17mm/F1.8
                    Lenses (OM Zuiko): 50mm/F1.2, 24mm/F2, 35mm/F2.8 shift
                    Lenses (OM Fit): Vivitar Series II 28-105mm/F2.8-3.8, Sigma 21-35mm/F3.4-4.2, Sigma 35-70mm/F2.8-4, Sigma 75-200mm/F2.8-3.5, Vivitar Series II 100-500mm/F5.6-8.0, Centon 500mm/F8 Mirror
                    Learn something new every day

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                    • #11
                      Re: Advice on lenses

                      Originally posted by OM USer View Post
                      You have a good range of lenses to cover all the well used focal lengths; the only lack being the less well used ultra wides. I would stick with what you have for the moment to see what upsets you the most. It might be size, weight, balance, speed of focus, changing lenses, or just plain old image quality. That way you can spend your pennies wisely on where it most counts. The 12-40 PRO is a stellar lens but does not suit everyone because of its limited zoom range which is why some people prefer the 12-100 PRO. If you find that you are happy with the range of the 12-50mm then this may inform your decision at some time in the future. Look at the pictures you are taking and decide if they are limited by your equipment (including ergonomics, lack of light, lack of reach or angle of view).

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                      • #12

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                        • #13
                          Re: Advice on lenses

                          My first Olympus kit contained the 12-50mm, the 40-150mm, and the 45mm f/1.8. This trio of lenses served me very well, until I found a need for something longer. You already have a 70-300mm, so you're covered there as well.

                          I would say, try using what you have for a while and let your next move be guided by any limitations you feel. You are well covered for a wide range of general photography so there's no need to rush! The 12-50 also includes quite a capable macro facility.

                          I added a 9-18mm but very rarely use it. For most scenes, I find 12mm is sufficient and you can 'stitch' panned photos to create wider panoramas.
                          Mike
                          visit my Natural History Photos website:
                          http://www.botanicdesign.co.uk/Natur...story/home.htm

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                          • #14
                            Re: Advice on lenses

                            I had a 9-18mm, didn't like it at all.
                            Not sharp enough at the edges and wasn't keen on the feel or operation of it.

                            Agree with Mike above when he says 12mm is sufficient, another reason I sold my 9-18

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                            • #15
                              Re: Advice on lenses

                              Originally posted by MikeOxon View Post
                              My first Olympus kit contained the 12-50mm, the 40-150mm, and the 45mm f/1.8. This trio of lenses served me very well, until I found a need for something longer. You already have a 70-300mm, so you're covered there as well.

                              I would say, try using what you have for a while and let your next move be guided by any limitations you feel. You are well covered for a wide range of general photography so there's no need to rush! The 12-50 also includes quite a capable macro facility.

                              I added a 9-18mm but very rarely use it. For most scenes, I find 12mm is sufficient and you can 'stitch' panned photos to create wider panoramas.
                              Thanks Mike, that seems sound advice, it appears from several member's replies that I probably have the right lenses for my needs. I think I was more concerned about using my FT lenses on the E-M1 with the adaptor and wondered if I should sell these and replace them with their MFT equivalents, it seems not necessary now.

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