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The importance of Sequential+IS Off

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  • #16
    Re: The importance of Sequential+IS Off

    Interesting observations, subjectively it does seem to slow down the sequential shooting rate (not sure if it says anything in the manual about this?)

    This sort of learning input is one reason I enjoy this site so much, thanks all

    I always have IS turned on
    me too, I'm too shaky to see clearly through the EVF to frame and focus the shot where I want it otherwise

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    • #17
      Re: The importance of Sequential+IS Off

      Originally posted by brian1208 View Post
      Interesting observations, subjectively it does seem to slow down the sequential shooting rate (not sure if it says anything in the manual about this?
      I have not been able to find a reference to it in the manual yet but it is mentioned in the Biofos set up guide: "If set to ON the Image Stabiliser is disengaged in sequential mode. Also shooting with IS enabled reduces sequential shooting to 3.5 fps."

      Incidentally he leaves it set to the default 'On' position.

      Ron

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      • #18
        Re: The importance of Sequential+IS Off

        Originally posted by Olybirder View Post
        They seem to show two things to me. One is that this setting is really important. The second is that I am not very good at long handheld exposures.

        Ron
        good to hear, and looking forward to some real life examples when the weather permits!

        I might also suggest that your examples also illustrates a third element - just how good the IS actually is now
        E, Pen and OM-D bodies
        43 m43 and legacy glass
        loads of flashes and accessories from all the systems

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        • #19
          Re: The importance of Sequential+IS Off

          Well...I've been out to harrass some pigeons during my lunch break (easy targets) with the IS in sequential mode enabled. It wasn't an ideal test as it decided to cloud over just as I went out so light wasn't great but not too bad...it's also pretty breezy out there today so not ideal conditions. Due to the light, I locked shutter speed to 1/500 and set auto ISO.

          When I bought the lens a few weeks ago I did the same thing so I have those results to compare against, and 90% of those were blurred like most of the other times i've been out with it.

          Today however, it looks alot more successful - I've definitely got a much higher hit rate of sharp images - and I can see that with better light and a faster shutter i'd almost certainly have more sharp than blurred.

          Obviously city pigeons are a bit more approachable than tits and finches so until I get out in decent light with some smaller targets I can't be sure, but certainly the signs are encouraging based on todays results.

          The image of the gull is a better measure to me as it's much sharper than those I was getting at a similar distance last weekend and they were in much better light.

          The last pic with the pigeon at distance is less convincing - I didn't get many opportunities to get them at distance today so again, results are sketchy, but that is an example of what i've been getting with seq IS off - the 100% crop is a straight OOC JPEG and it demonstrates the lack of definition compared to my expectations (which may be unreasonable...remains to be seen!). I might be able to improve that if I alter the camera settings to improve the JPEG output - I haven't experimented with that yet as I tend to shoot with JPEG + RAW and use the RAW anyway but I'm at work and have no Photoshop so I can only work on JPEGs for now!

          1/500, ISO 400, 179mm, f6.3

          1/500, ISO 320, 234mm, f6.4

          1/500, ISO 320, 258mm, f6.5

          1/500, ISO 640, 300mm, f7.1

          100% crop of above image

          I'm certainly encouraged, if not yet fully convinced!
          Last edited by themosttogain; 5th February 2014, 03:15 PM. Reason: Images in wrong order
          Slowly expanding Flickr
          ..and my horribly out of date website

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          • #20
            Re: The importance of Sequential+IS Off

            I have mention among others the influence of that tricky setting (factory default setting for Seq+IS) one month ago : http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=30863,

            also I believe biofos is wrong (there are some mistakes on other settings too) that in sequential shooting the frame rate drops to 3.5fps, there are other parameters for the frame drop (lens motor drive especially on 4/3, light etc..)

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            • #21
              Re: The importance of Sequential+IS Off

              Thanks for posting those images and taking the time to write your experiences. The first three certainly look good with plenty of detail. The last one definitely looks a bit soft but the light obviusly wasn't good and the ISO is higher than the others which would not help. To my untrained eyes it looks more like a focusing issue than a movement one but what do I know?

              Hopefully things will improve when the light gets better but it looks to me as if 'that' setting could be part of the problem.

              Ron

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              • #22
                Re: The importance of Sequential+IS Off

                Originally posted by themosttogain View Post

                Today however, it looks alot more successful - I've definitely got a much higher hit rate of sharp images - and I can see that with better light and a faster shutter i'd almost certainly have more sharp than blurred.



                The last pic with the pigeon at distance is less convincing - I didn't get many opportunities to get them at distance today so again, results are sketchy, but that is an example of what i've been getting with seq IS off - the 100% crop is a straight OOC JPEG and it demonstrates the lack of definition compared to my expectations (which may be unreasonable...remains to be seen!). I might be able to improve that if I alter the camera settings to improve the JPEG output - I haven't experimented with that yet as I tend to shoot with JPEG + RAW and use the RAW anyway but I'm at work and have no Photoshop so I can only work on JPEGs for now!


                I'm certainly encouraged, if not yet fully convinced!
                to my eye you risk dof issues cofusing the question of image sharpness with the first 3; by this I mean that when viewing the image file you are unlikely to have all of the elements you 'check for sharpness' in the focus plane at that magnifiation eg eye and beak tip in 1, 2 appears focused on the birds wing so the head won't be sharp, in 3 you won't get both legs and beak (but should get the eye with one or other ) and in 4 it looks like the AF is on the fence (but it's hard to be definitive from this - it's not ISO or jpeg settings; it's just OOF).
                E, Pen and OM-D bodies
                43 m43 and legacy glass
                loads of flashes and accessories from all the systems

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                • #23
                  Re: The importance of Sequential+IS Off

                  Originally posted by photo_owl View Post
                  to my eye you risk dof issues cofusing the question of image sharpness with the first 3; by this I mean that when viewing the image file you are unlikely to have all of the elements you 'check for sharpness' in the focus plane at that magnifiation eg eye and beak tip in 1, 2 appears focused on the birds wing so the head won't be sharp, in 3 you won't get both legs and beak (but should get the eye with one or other ) and in 4 it looks like the AF is on the fence (but it's hard to be definitive from this - it's not ISO or jpeg settings; it's just OOF).
                  I certainly wouldn't bet against your diagnosis of #4 being out of focus...I'd hoped to get a few more at a similar distance to test the 300mm length a bit more (as thats where i've had constantly disappointing results), but time and conditions were against me.

                  I know DOF plays its part, and going through what I took today, there are plenty that I would consider 'sharp' even where large (and often important) portions of the bird are out of focus...If any part of the bird is sharp and detailed, I consider that a sharp image...fully aware that I misfocused/didn't use a small enough aperture or the bird moved.

                  I'm looking forward to testing further as that setting does seem to have made a difference, so thank you, and also to kbouk for the heads up on something i'd overlooked.
                  Slowly expanding Flickr
                  ..and my horribly out of date website

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                  • #24
                    Re: The importance of Sequential+IS Off

                    shooting through my kitchen window with the setting to Off seems to have improved detail a bit (although I may be imagining things?)


                    wide open at 124mm with ISO1600 for 1/400th sec (lower than my usual range)





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                    • #25
                      Re: The importance of Sequential+IS Off

                      Since Hengistbury Head and my Black outs followed by full Lock Up and having to remove the battery ... my images have been SOFT ! NOW I KNOW WHY

                      Thanks HUGE THANKS TO Ron and Photo Owl ... since I lost My Set 1 and 2 then and DEF. forgot this BAD BOY ... You have saved my ONE a holiday (all expenses paid to Portugal )
                      .
                      .
                      [I].
                      .
                      I Lurve Walking in our Glorious Countryside; Photography;
                      Riding Ducati Motorbikes; Reading & Cooking ! ...


                      http://www.flickr.com/photos/photomagicf1_chevvy/sets/

                      the ONE photo album

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                      • #26
                        Re: The importance of Sequential+IS Off

                        I can't see, logically, why having IS on would slow down a sequential rate as IS responds to camera movements and has no link to the shutter mechanism. I have tested the camera with a m4/3 lens, IS on and off at 10fps and it doesn't appear (audibly) to slow the rate at all. So what was this information based on as it doesn't appear to be covered on the manual?

                        David
                        PBase Galleries:-http://www.pbase.com/davidmorisonimages

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                        • #27
                          Re: The importance of Sequential+IS Off

                          I stopped off at the harbour for about 20 minutes on my way to work this morning to try out the new setting on some unsuspecting birds. The sun hadn't really broken through, so the light was not very good and the wind was very cold and fresh, so I was shivering and shaking, which didn't help. However, I think there was definitely an improvement in the results, although I still had to dump quite a few shots. I put this down to operator error in the conditons and little birds which were scurrying about all over the place and rarely stayed still for a second. I look forward to trying again in better light.




                          Herring Gulls 1/400 sec, f/5.8, ISO 400




                          Sanderling 1/320 sec, f/6.7, ISO 800




                          Turnstone 1/400 sec, f/6.7, ISO 1600




                          Herring Gull 1/320 sec, f/5.5, ISO 200

                          Ron

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                          • #28
                            Re: The importance of Sequential+IS Off

                            Originally posted by David Morison View Post
                            I can't see, logically, why having IS on would slow down a sequential rate as IS responds to camera movements and has no link to the shutter mechanism. I have tested the camera with a m4/3 lens, IS on and off at 10fps and it doesn't appear (audibly) to slow the rate at all. So what was this information based on as it doesn't appear to be covered on the manual?

                            David
                            if you go to the link in post #20 you will see that I concluded the same based on a similar 'test'.

                            whilst I have nothing whatsoever to base it on I strongly suspect that the reality lies in something like -

                            when shoting sequentially at higher than 3.5fps with IS on it is possible that reduced rates may be experienced.....

                            given the number of other issues that will also affect frame rates I really don't give a monkeys what the actual figures might theoretically be - the unavoidable fact is that they will be what they will be!

                            however, the basis of IS in these cameras does mean that you will see apparently displaced subjects when using v long focal length lenses and IS in Seq because the sensor is moved to different positions, which can look a little 'weird' - but given the alternative it's a no-brainer.

                            personally I think Oly have the wrong default setting here - but that's just my opinion.
                            E, Pen and OM-D bodies
                            43 m43 and legacy glass
                            loads of flashes and accessories from all the systems

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: The importance of Sequential+IS Off

                              Originally posted by Olybirder View Post
                              I stopped off at the harbour for about 20 minutes on my way to work this morning to try out the new setting on some unsuspecting birds.
                              love no 1 Ron.

                              2 looks like a combination of subject movement and a slight AF miss

                              3 looks like subject movement with an AF hit

                              most importantly there's something sharp in all of them - and to a significant degree you can now rule out the underlying capability of the lens or camera's abilities at high ISO (I would move up your shutter speeds signifcantly and accept much higher ISO's next if I was you)
                              E, Pen and OM-D bodies
                              43 m43 and legacy glass
                              loads of flashes and accessories from all the systems

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: The importance of Sequential+IS Off

                                Originally posted by photo_owl View Post
                                personally I think Oly have the wrong default setting here - but that's just my opinion.
                                Couldn't agree more with that.

                                Ron's new batch of pics certainly seem to support the theory too...things are looking up!

                                Slowly expanding Flickr
                                ..and my horribly out of date website

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