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Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II The second Micro Four Thirds camera that offers phase detect focusing so you can use Four Thirds DSLR lenses normally as well a Micro Four Thirds lenses.

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Old 4 Weeks Ago
Clockwork Donkey Clockwork Donkey is offline
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Re: E-M1.2 overexposing by about one stop.

It is possible to "calibrate" your meter to suit your preferences. For me, my EM1 Mk2 tended to under expose by around two thirds of a stop. I dialled +2/3 into the exposure shift and I am now a happy bunny.


http://wrotniak.net/photo/m43/em1.2-sett.html#EXPSH
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  #17  
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Re: E-M1.2 overexposing by about one stop.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave in Wales View Post
Oooooooo....Exasperated.

Everybody it seems, everybody, is misinterpreting the essence of this thread.

I know about exposures, how to manage them, how to manipulate them in camera to achieve the desired result....we're talking JPEG here.

I could and do shoot JPEG+RAW....RAW would solve the image exposure problem but not the EVF and Live View over exposure.

Even with a cardboard camera from Boots, when one looks through the viewfinder at a scene, one sees what's on the other side of the lens.
The resulting captured image is, more or less, the same.

If I look through 'any' view finder I expect to see and capture what's on the other side.

My GRIPE is that with my 2k technical wizard I do not, I see and capture something different.

I've fiddled with menu settings, EVF adjust and LV Boost etc and those suggested by Oly, nothing works.

I've had many OMD bodies and none have behaved like this one.

WISIWIG is what I love about M4/3 but it's not happening.

Now the problem has been batted back to Oly....watch this space.
Like @Growltiger, I'm confused too. Which of these problems do you have:

a) The JPEGs from the camera are over-exposed according to my opinion of how the scene should have been exposed.

b) The exposure indicators in the EVF (blinkies, histogram) are showing a different exposure to what comes out on the JPEGs.

c) The EVF seems too bright to my eye. NOTE - this is not the same as (b) - if you think it's too bright but the histogram/blinkies are working as expected then the camera is metering and exposing correctly, it's just the brightness of the EVF.

If it's (a), then you need to tweak the exposure comp (temporarily or permanently to taste).

If it's (b), then you have a fault with your camera.

If it's (c), then you need to tweak the EVF brightness to suit your taste. Remember that there are two things that you need to consider:

- The camera has an auto EVF brightness option. It'll try to adjust the brightness according to the overall EV of the metered scene. This is what I use but it does mean that it's sometimes not perfect for all lighting situations.

- The camera has an "OVF" simulation mode. This tries to make the view in the EVF match the apparent EV that the mater is reading. That is - if the scene is dark (absolute EV) then the EVF will be dark whilst if the scene is bright then the EVF will be bright. The corollary of this is that if OVF is off then the EVF will be brightened even if the scene is dark - is this what you're objecting to?

Finally, remember too that LiveView has some limitations. In particular, showing a LiveView of exp comp has limits on how much it can render in low light. That is - if the light is low (actually very low) and you add exp comp then there is a limit to how much the EVF will reflect this increased exposure. It's to do with the frame rate in LiveView.

Hope that helps.
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Re: E-M1.2 overexposing by about one stop.

The histogram is always a good starting point for assessing exposure accuracy. This is the histogram for picture one. Note how the pixels are bunched up on the left with very few on the right, indicating under exposure.




This is the histogram for picture two (SOOC jpeg) This shows a much more even distribution of pixels across the graph, recording detail in both shadows and highlights with less clipping of the shadows.




So clearly the camera got it right. However, this is not the end of the story because a technically correct exposure may lack the mood that the photographer was trying to capture in which case applying exposure compensation is appropriate.
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Re: E-M1.2 overexposing by about one stop.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pdk42 View Post
Like @Growltiger, I'm confused too. Which of these problems do you have:

a) The JPEGs from the camera are over-exposed according to my opinion of how the scene should have been exposed.

b) The exposure indicators in the EVF (blinkies, histogram) are showing a different exposure to what comes out on the JPEGs.

c) The EVF seems too bright to my eye. NOTE - this is not the same as (b) - if you think it's too bright but the histogram/blinkies are working as expected then the camera is metering and exposing correctly, it's just the brightness of the EVF.

If it's (a), then you need to tweak the exposure comp (temporarily or permanently to taste).

If it's (b), then you have a fault with your camera.

If it's (c), then you need to tweak the EVF brightness to suit your taste. Remember that there are two things that you need to consider:

- The camera has an auto EVF brightness option. It'll try to adjust the brightness according to the overall EV of the metered scene. This is what I use but it does mean that it's sometimes not perfect for all lighting situations.

- The camera has an "OVF" simulation mode. This tries to make the view in the EVF match the apparent EV that the mater is reading. That is - if the scene is dark (absolute EV) then the EVF will be dark whilst if the scene is bright then the EVF will be bright. The corollary of this is that if OVF is off then the EVF will be brightened even if the scene is dark - is this what you're objecting to?

Finally, remember too that LiveView has some limitations. In particular, showing a LiveView of exp comp has limits on how much it can render in low light. That is - if the light is low (actually very low) and you add exp comp then there is a limit to how much the EVF will reflect this increased exposure. It's to do with the frame rate in LiveView.

Hope that helps.
WOW Paul, thanks a bunch.
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Re: E-M1.2 overexposing by about one stop.

I think the explanation is that there is nothing wrong. Cameras are designed to adjust to give correct exposure for the subject. i.e. they don't aim to make bright subjects overexposed and dark subjects underexposed.

The photo of the dark room doesn't make it look dark, instead it is correctly exposed. I suspect the histogram would confirm this is so.

You see it as a dark room, and you want the photograph to look darker, perhaps one stop darker. So the solution is to set the exposure adjustment to -1 or pehaps even more. The EVF will look darker, the photo will look darker, and the histogram will move to the left. This is exactly what exposure compensation is for, it allows you to make the photo come out as you think of it, not as a standard exposure.

The clue is the "how I see it" comment. You see it as a dark room, so you want it dark, so adjust to minus.

There is another good example in reverse which is snow. A camera can render a brightly lit snow scene as a dismal grey, and so it needs plus compensation to make it white enough to match your vision.

PS. Nothing will make me follow you to DPR. Sorry.
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MikeOxon MikeOxon is offline
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Re: E-M1.2 overexposing by about one stop.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave in Wales View Post
......................Never had this before with either M5, M1.1 or M5.2 usually ambient lighting is whats seen through the EVF.

Clearly, you find something is 'different' about the E-M1MkII. When I first had mine, I thought the EVF seemed brighter but I soon got used to it. I even mentioned it in this post on my 'butterfly diary'. http://www.ukbutterflies.co.uk/phpBB...rt=820#p128539



I suspect that all viewfinder images require some interpretation and a lot may depend on how dark-adapted your eyes are, when you look into the finder.
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Last edited by MikeOxon; 3 Weeks Ago at 04:18 PM. Reason: added info
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