Olympus UK E-System User Group
Olympus UK E-System User Group

Join our unique resource for Olympus Four Thirds E-System DSLR and Pen and OM-D Micro Four Thirds photographers. Show your images via our free e-group photo gallery. Please read the e-group.uk.net forum terms and conditions before posting for the first time. Above all, welcome!


Go Back   Olympus UK E-System User Group > Cameras, lenses and system accessories > Camera conference

Camera conference General and model-specific E-System camera chat.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 4th April 2011
Robusto's Avatar
Robusto Robusto is offline
Full member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Colindale, London
Posts: 286
Thanks: 14
Thanked 12 Times in 12 Posts
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Send a message via MSN to Robusto
Camera Setting

A little help needed

Started using my new E30 over the weekend with the 50-200 for football shoots

my question how do i get my subject in focus and the background to blur

here i have a picture (bird) taken on the E300 with 70-300 with blurring

then here is one take over the weekend (football) how do i get the background blur

regards
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 20090625_130.jpg (87.3 KB, 17 views)
File Type: jpg 20110404_136a.jpg (75.7 KB, 26 views)
__________________
To me, The goal is to move people, to make people think, but never, never at the expense of the person you're photographing. To laugh with, yes - but never to laugh at. - Lord Snowdon

Martyn
Olympus E30, HLD4 Grip E520 E300 HLD3 Grip, Pen E-PL1 Zuiko m14-42mm
Zuiko OM 28mm 2.8, 50mm 1.8 , 80-200mm
ZD 14-42mm, 14-45mm, 14-54mm, 40-150mm ,50-200mm , 70-300mm, 35mm Macro , EX-25
Sigma 50-500mm To be Obtained
Olympus FL36R ;Metz Flash 28AF-30
http://cannoncannonphotography.webs.com/
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 5th April 2011
Ouch! Ouch! is offline
Full member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Essex; a land where men are men and Ford Escorts are stolen!
Posts: 50
Thanks: 1
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Re: Camera Setting

Right I'm a beginner in the world of digital photography but what you're talking about is 'depth of field'.

Depth of field relates to the furthest and the closest parts of the picture that are in sharp focus.

When you have you nice zoom lens at the long end (i.e 300mm) the depth of field is shorter than the other end (i.e.70mm). So, the subject is sharp and the background (and forgorund) will be blurry. To accentuate this, you can open the apature wide. This uses more of the lens and so less of the picture will be in sharp focus; less depth of field. By closing the apature you only use the little centre portion of the lens and more of the photo will be sharp, both in front of and behind the subject.

If you want the background to blur, use your widest apature setting and longer lens and compensate with a faster shutter speed. (Or even a nuetral density filter if the image is too bright).

Most photographic websites will explain depth of field, better than me, but I hope this makes some sense.

My old OM system lenses, even had the depth of field marked on them at different f numbers. So if you wanted to blur the background you could slightly over focus the lens, putting the subject at the back of the depth of field, therefore guaranteeing that the background would be blurred. These helpful marks do not seem to appear on the modern auto-focus lenses.

Ouch!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 5th April 2011
Ian's Avatar
Ian Ian is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, UK
Posts: 11,411
Thanks: 415
Thanked 2,443 Times in 1,232 Posts
Likes: 829
Liked 1,651 Times in 739 Posts
Re: Camera Setting

Hi Martyn, basically to blur the background more than you already have you need to reduce the depth of field (the range in front of and behind the focussed subject) that is in sharp focus. You can achieve this in two ways: open the aperture up (try the 50-200 @200mm using fully open aperture f/3.5), and get closer to the subject. The closer you focus, the less likely the background will be well defined.

In the pigeon shot you are closer and the 70-300 is longer focal length (300mm compared to 200mm) - so the depth of field is much smaller.

Best way to demonstrate this is to try it out

Ian
__________________
Founder and editor of:
Olympus UK E-System User Group (http://e-group.uk.net)
Four Thirds User (http://fourthirds-user.com)
Digital Photography Now (http://dpnow.com)
Olympus camera, lens, and accessory hire (http://e-group.uk.net/hire)

Twitter: www.twitter.com/ian_burley
Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/dpnow/
Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/ianburley/
NEW: My personal BLOG ianburley.com
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 5th April 2011
wanderer's Avatar
wanderer wanderer is offline
Full member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Penicuik
Posts: 1,240
Thanks: 94
Thanked 115 Times in 100 Posts
Likes: 15
Liked 42 Times in 26 Posts
Re: Camera Setting

I would also add that when focussing on a relatively near object (the pigeon) the depth of focus is a much shorter distance than on a far object (the footballer). So the background on the near object is thrown out of focus more than the far object.
In numbers; the pigeon looks about 5 metres away and the background 10 metres. The depth of focus is probably from 4 to 6 metres at best and probably half that.
if the footballer is 30 metres distant the focus is likely to be 27 to 35 metres with the goalpost still recognisable at double that. If the aperture is F8 rather than F4.5 the depth of focus is even greater.
As above therefore the footballer should be photographed with the aperture wide open (4.5 thereabouts) and this consequently means a faster shutter speed which helps to freeze the action.
It is often difficult to get a background that is a general blur. Usually there is something that betrays itself (goalpost). This is because you are concentrating on the action rather than the background. And its surprising how often it sticks out of the person's head.
__________________
Duncan

Lots of toys.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 6th April 2011
danellis danellis is offline
Full member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Bristol, UK
Posts: 148
Thanks: 2
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Likes: 17
Liked 13 Times in 8 Posts
Re: Camera Setting

So the number after the f needs to be as small as possible?

dJE
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 6th April 2011
StephenL's Avatar
StephenL StephenL is offline
Senior Pixelmonger
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Yorkshire Dales
Posts: 9,863
Thanks: 984
Thanked 1,126 Times in 921 Posts
Likes: 658
Liked 755 Times in 499 Posts
Re: Camera Setting

Amended version following Bikie John's correction

The smaller the f number the larger the aperture therefore the shallower the depth of focus. ie f4 will show less sharpness to the front and rear of your subject than f8.

Don't forget to put your camera in A (aperture priority) so that the shutter speed is automatically adjusted to compensate.
__________________
Stephen

A camera takes a picture. A photographer makes a picture

Fuji X system, + Leica and Bronica film

My Flickr site

Last edited by StephenL; 6th April 2011 at 02:31 PM. Reason: correction
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 6th April 2011
Bikie John's Avatar
Bikie John Bikie John is offline
Full member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wessex
Posts: 3,889
Thanks: 186
Thanked 639 Times in 567 Posts
Likes: 471
Liked 712 Times in 478 Posts
Re: Camera Setting

Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenL View Post
The larger the f number the larger the aperture therefore the shallower the depth of focus. ie f4 will show less sharpness to the front and rear of your subject than f8.
Bit of finger trouble there, I think. The smaller the f number, the larger the aperture therefore the shallower the depth of focus. So as Stephen says with f/4 there will be less sharpness in front and behind than with f/8, which is what you want in ths case. Smaller f-numbers also allow faster shutter speeds so are better for freezing movement - so generally for sports work small f-numbers are good.

Sorry to be picky, but I thought it looked potentially confusing as written.

Ciao ... John
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 6th April 2011
StephenL's Avatar
StephenL StephenL is offline
Senior Pixelmonger
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Yorkshire Dales
Posts: 9,863
Thanks: 984
Thanked 1,126 Times in 921 Posts
Likes: 658
Liked 755 Times in 499 Posts
Re: Camera Setting

Sorry you are quite right! Getting confused - it's my age you know!
__________________
Stephen

A camera takes a picture. A photographer makes a picture

Fuji X system, + Leica and Bronica film

My Flickr site
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Weaning myself off the auto setting Homer Simpson Olympus E-520 5 6th March 2011 10:12 AM
Setting the E-500 to take the best quality picture possible TYS1977 Olympus E-500 7 26th November 2010 09:22 PM
another forums advice on best setting for 70-300 alexs Lens focus 7 16th May 2010 01:55 PM
Egyptian Setting sun. NSS Foto Fair 4 19th November 2009 09:28 PM
Antishake setting yorky The lounge 3 24th May 2008 10:01 AM


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:14 PM.


The Write Technology Ltd, 2007-2019, All rights reservedAd Management plugin by RedTyger