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Old 17th August 2017
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Thumbs up Why getting it right in-camera is always best.

An article in the Australian Photography magazine I though worth sharing.
Why getting it right in-camera is always best By Michael Snedic | 10 August 2017
Read more at http://www.australianphotography.com...eXSlbJh3XYl.99

I also believe that using jpeg functions (& some art filters too perhaps etc), particularly Keystone Compensation, can be worthwhile in helping to get the best from the camera for post adjustments to the raw.

In this web version (& maybe the printed magazine) there is a photo of a male Satin Bowerbird, something I am still hoping to get a good image of, but the male here around home has a bower in the back of the neighbours place (or did). So far I have a reasonable photo of the female with those blue eyes, but it is still a cropped image.


Larger version here. http://fourthirds-user.com/galleries...hp?photo=30983

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I fiddle with violins (when I'm not fiddling with a camera).
Cameras: OM-D E-M1 & Mk II, Olympus Stylus 1, OM-D E-M5.
Lenses: M.ZD40-150mm f2.8 PRO Lens with MC-14, M.ZD12-50, M.ZD60 Macro, M.ZD75-300 Mk II, MMF-3, ZD14-54 II, ZD12-60 SWD, ZD50-200 SWD, EC14, EC20, EX25, Sigma 150mm F2.8 APO Macro DG HSM.
Flashes: FL36R X2, FL50R, FL50.
Software: Capture One Pro 10 (& Olympus Viewer 3).
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Old 17th August 2017
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Re: Why getting it right in-camera is always best.

Quote "By moving slowly towards an animal and therefore reducing the chance of it scampering away, you will increase the size of the image in your frame. Less cropping needed later!|"
Read more at http://www.australianphotography.com...s/why-getting-

The article is good and re-emphasises what we all try and do.

But the above quote is hopeful to say the least. All my wild birds barely stay around long enough for me to raise the camera, never mind compose and sort exposures.....Some do, robins especially. I reckon they see the big glass eye and say to themselves.."lets get out here before that burger gets us..."

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  #3  
Old 17th August 2017
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Ross the fiddler Ross the fiddler is offline
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Re: Why getting it right in-camera is always best.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ224 View Post
Quote "By moving slowly towards an animal and therefore reducing the chance of it scampering away, you will increase the size of the image in your frame. Less cropping needed later!|"
Read more at http://www.australianphotography.com...s/why-getting-

The article is good and re-emphasises what we all try and do.

But the above quote is hopeful to say the least. All my wild birds barely stay around long enough for me to raise the camera, never mind compose and sort exposures.....Some do, robins especially. I reckon they see the big glass eye and say to themselves.."lets get out here before that burger gets us..."

Yeah, I know that feeling.
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I fiddle with violins (when I'm not fiddling with a camera).
Cameras: OM-D E-M1 & Mk II, Olympus Stylus 1, OM-D E-M5.
Lenses: M.ZD40-150mm f2.8 PRO Lens with MC-14, M.ZD12-50, M.ZD60 Macro, M.ZD75-300 Mk II, MMF-3, ZD14-54 II, ZD12-60 SWD, ZD50-200 SWD, EC14, EC20, EX25, Sigma 150mm F2.8 APO Macro DG HSM.
Flashes: FL36R X2, FL50R, FL50.
Software: Capture One Pro 10 (& Olympus Viewer 3).
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Old 17th August 2017
Joop Joop is offline
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Re: Why getting it right in-camera is always best.

I don't agree with Michael Snedic. Its better not to have tack sharp pictures from your camera. You can always sharpening a picture afterwards, but you never can unsharpen a picture. If you have to do something with that picture you have to wait with sharpening to the last step. Adjust sharpening to an end value of -1 in your camera, just try it, you can always go back.
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Old 17th August 2017
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Ross the fiddler Ross the fiddler is offline
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Re: Why getting it right in-camera is always best.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joop View Post
I don't agree with Michael Snedic. Its better not to have tack sharp pictures from your camera. You can always sharpening a picture afterwards, but you never can unsharpen a picture. If you have to do something with that picture you have to wait with sharpening to the last step. Adjust sharpening to an end value of -1 in your camera, just try it, you can always go back.
Thanks for your comment, but I think you are confusing in camera sharpening to the jpeg which is not applicable to a raw file (although can be embedded) & sharp focus without movement blur where it is undesirable. I'll just quote the opening comments on that section from him here.

"Sharp is Best

If you take an image that's blurry, due to a low shutter speed or unsteady camera-holding techniques, it's near-impossible to 'correct' it in post-processing. Sure, you can sharpen images but no amount of computer work will improve an image that's faulty from the start. Therefore, learning the best settings and techniques from the start is very important.

If you enjoy photographing fast-moving subjects such as birds in flight, it goes without saying that getting a sharp shot in-camera, rather than correcting a 'soft' image later, is by far the preferred method. When using a large lens, using correct hand-holding techniques will help eliminate 'shake'."


If someone is able to afford the E-M1 Mk II with the 300mm Pro lens (+ MC14) with inbuilt IS & thus Sync IS with the body, then hand shake is somewhat reduced, but that doesn't fix subject movement blur though.
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I fiddle with violins (when I'm not fiddling with a camera).
Cameras: OM-D E-M1 & Mk II, Olympus Stylus 1, OM-D E-M5.
Lenses: M.ZD40-150mm f2.8 PRO Lens with MC-14, M.ZD12-50, M.ZD60 Macro, M.ZD75-300 Mk II, MMF-3, ZD14-54 II, ZD12-60 SWD, ZD50-200 SWD, EC14, EC20, EX25, Sigma 150mm F2.8 APO Macro DG HSM.
Flashes: FL36R X2, FL50R, FL50.
Software: Capture One Pro 10 (& Olympus Viewer 3).
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Old 18th August 2017
Jim Ford Jim Ford is offline
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Re: Why getting it right in-camera is always best.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joop View Post
I don't agree with Michael Snedic. Its better not to have tack sharp pictures from your camera. You can always sharpening a picture afterwards, but you never can unsharpen a picture. If you have to do something with that picture you have to wait with sharpening to the last step. Adjust sharpening to an end value of -1 in your camera, just try it, you can always go back.
I believe in the opposite to what you're saying above, Joop!

If an image is captured out of focus then some detail is missing. No amount of 'magicking' by Photoshop will invent that detail. Conversely, a sharp image can always be unsharpened to any degree by tools available in Photoshop.

Jim
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Old 4 Weeks Ago
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Re: Why getting it right in-camera is always best.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ224 View Post
Quote "By moving slowly towards an animal and therefore reducing the chance of it scampering away, you will increase the size of the image in your frame. Less cropping needed later!|"
Read more at http://www.australianphotography.com...s/why-getting-

The article is good and re-emphasises what we all try and do.

But the above quote is hopeful to say the least. All my wild birds barely stay around long enough for me to raise the camera, never mind compose and sort exposures.....Some do, robins especially. I reckon they see the big glass eye and say to themselves.."lets get out here before that burger gets us..."

I read his article with interest and I support your views Mark, given the situations in which we find ourselves meeting up with birds and wildlife in the habitat. The baby Ibis I posted up today, is now fully grown and often comes to the duck pond in the garden with mum and dad Ibis, along for a drink or a patter for worms in the ground. They have got used to us, but I respect their boundaries and never forget how wild they are. I ought to post up their photos on Flickr
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Re: Why getting it right in-camera is always best.

That was a good read Ross thanks for posting it.
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Re: Why getting it right in-camera is always best.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Ford View Post
I believe in the opposite to what you're saying above, Joop!

If an image is captured out of focus then some detail is missing. No amount of 'magicking' by Photoshop will invent that detail. Conversely, a sharp image can always be unsharpened to any degree by tools available in Photoshop.

Jim
Unsharpening is an other process with a different outcome then soft images from camera. I have to add that I always shoot jpg and very occasionally raw. The reason is that with raw you are depended on what the software producers are supporting for your brand/make of your camera. I know stories from Canon and Nikon users with raw which are forever gone, just because the format is no longer supported. The format jpg is too much a standard and will be supported one way or the other. If an image is out of focus, something different then soft, then there are some solutions for correcting that to some point. Slight image blur can be corrected, however the package I know does that only with small images. May be the software can be rewritten for bigger images, but the needed amount of memory goes up very fast and memory is still a problem, because having much memory also includes heavy processing or in other words powerful cpu's and probably more than one or two. I see this solution for that image which can't be redone and which is in a way unique. Also I don't use Windows, did use an i-mac, but that didn't give me what I had expected, Apple is too much busy with what you can do and can't do and doesn't have nationalization right which popup as soon as you are going do things which aren't in the field of what Apple had in mind. Some problems I reported are still not fixed. As Apple is Linux with an Apple frontend, same for Linux, its not my system.
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Old 1 Week Ago
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Ross the fiddler Ross the fiddler is offline
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Re: Why getting it right in-camera is always best.

The best solution is to save both JPEG & raw as memory is cheap & in focus, otherwise any software that can 'fix' lost detail is only inventing it basically.

That's why it is best to get it right in camera in the first place.

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I fiddle with violins (when I'm not fiddling with a camera).
Cameras: OM-D E-M1 & Mk II, Olympus Stylus 1, OM-D E-M5.
Lenses: M.ZD40-150mm f2.8 PRO Lens with MC-14, M.ZD12-50, M.ZD60 Macro, M.ZD75-300 Mk II, MMF-3, ZD14-54 II, ZD12-60 SWD, ZD50-200 SWD, EC14, EC20, EX25, Sigma 150mm F2.8 APO Macro DG HSM.
Flashes: FL36R X2, FL50R, FL50.
Software: Capture One Pro 10 (& Olympus Viewer 3).
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Old 1 Week Ago
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Re: Why getting it right in-camera is always best.

Having written blog posts about getting it right in camera and about checking your settings before and after a shoot guess who left exposure compensation dialed in from the sunrise this morning when a Racoon wandered into the yard this afternoon.

Anyone would think I'm your typical Canon user.
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Re: Why getting it right in-camera is always best.

Easy done David I do that sort of thing quite a lot these days.
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Old 1 Week Ago
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Re: Why getting it right in-camera is always best.

Quote:
Originally Posted by David M View Post
Having written blog posts about getting it right in camera and about checking your settings before and after a shoot guess who left exposure compensation dialed in from the sunrise this morning when a Racoon wandered into the yard this afternoon.

Anyone would think I'm your typical Canon user.
You mean with the lens hood reversed in the park position outside in the sun as well?
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Ross
I fiddle with violins (when I'm not fiddling with a camera).
Cameras: OM-D E-M1 & Mk II, Olympus Stylus 1, OM-D E-M5.
Lenses: M.ZD40-150mm f2.8 PRO Lens with MC-14, M.ZD12-50, M.ZD60 Macro, M.ZD75-300 Mk II, MMF-3, ZD14-54 II, ZD12-60 SWD, ZD50-200 SWD, EC14, EC20, EX25, Sigma 150mm F2.8 APO Macro DG HSM.
Flashes: FL36R X2, FL50R, FL50.
Software: Capture One Pro 10 (& Olympus Viewer 3).
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Re: Why getting it right in-camera is always best.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ross the fiddler View Post
You mean with the lens hood reversed in the park position outside in the sun as well?
Yes, and a huge white zoom supported on a spindly tripod barely capable of supporting a flash.
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Re: Why getting it right in-camera is always best.

Quote:
Originally Posted by David M View Post
Having written blog posts about getting it right in camera and about checking your settings before and after a shoot guess who left exposure compensation dialed in from the sunrise this morning when a Racoon wandered into the yard this afternoon.

Anyone would think I'm your typical Canon user.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ross the fiddler View Post
You mean with the lens hood reversed in the park position outside in the sun as well?
It must have been a Canon photographer that took this one.



Actually, it was this guy. https://www.facebook.com/kelmoralesphotos/ with a lot of Olympus gear (& other stuff). https://www.thestancollective.com/gear
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Ross
I fiddle with violins (when I'm not fiddling with a camera).
Cameras: OM-D E-M1 & Mk II, Olympus Stylus 1, OM-D E-M5.
Lenses: M.ZD40-150mm f2.8 PRO Lens with MC-14, M.ZD12-50, M.ZD60 Macro, M.ZD75-300 Mk II, MMF-3, ZD14-54 II, ZD12-60 SWD, ZD50-200 SWD, EC14, EC20, EX25, Sigma 150mm F2.8 APO Macro DG HSM.
Flashes: FL36R X2, FL50R, FL50.
Software: Capture One Pro 10 (& Olympus Viewer 3).
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