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Old 14th July 2018
Ricoh Ricoh is offline
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Anyone into Cyanotypes ?

The technique often uses physical objects such as pressed flowers, twigs etc, or large negatives, 8"x10", for example. Not many of us have large cameras, but all is not lost. I found a tutorial (linked below) showing how a 'negative' can be produced by inverting a 35mm or M43 digital file (in PP) and printing it onto OHP film, thus becoming the required large 'negative'. The rest is readily available chemistry... and sunlight.

Cool!!

https://www.lomography.com/magazine/...ing-cyanotypes
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Old 14th July 2018
Petrochemist Petrochemist is offline
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Re: Anyone into Cyanotypes ?

There on my list to try, and I do have a 5x4 camera
Unfortunately there a huge amount on the list so I may not get round to them till 10 years after I retire!
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Old 15th July 2018
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Re: Anyone into Cyanotypes ?

A friend of mine did some a few years ago, and heís also had a go with tintypes I think.

Just a word on safety of the cyanotype process - as long as youíre reasonably careful toxicity I donít think is much of an issue, but it is sensitising (ie allergising) to some people. So if anything starts happening like this, do stop: https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/hhe/report...81-171-880.pdf
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Old 15th July 2018
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Re: Anyone into Cyanotypes ?

Thanks for the link, Mark.
I cut to the chase for the summary, but I will read more fully before the alchemy begins.
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Old 16th July 2018
Chrislluk Chrislluk is offline
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Re: Anyone into Cyanotypes ?

I've spent quite a bit of time playing with cyanotypes (and have got quite a lot of chemistry classes in Scotland experimenting with it).
As a chemist and H&S professional, I am baffled by the NIOSH report mentioned by Mark above. Dichromates (or any chromium vi compounds) should be used with caution but they have nothing whatever to do with cyanotypes. The only potential hazard is if you mix the hexacyanoferrate (ferricyanide) with a fairly concentrated strong acid - not something that can happen by accident.
The only problem with the process is that the lack of sensitivity means that unless you have a large format camera (and I'm only assuming that would work) you need to print a negative onto acetate and then use that 1:1 with the paper.
It's great fun though and the fact that you don't need a darkroom or any special facilities is a real plus on the accessibility front.
Best place to start is alternativephotography.com. Give it a go.
Cheers,
Chris
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Old 16th July 2018
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Re: Anyone into Cyanotypes ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chrislluk View Post
I've spent quite a bit of time playing with cyanotypes (and have got quite a lot of chemistry classes in Scotland experimenting with it).
As a chemist and H&S professional, I am baffled by the NIOSH report mentioned by Mark above. Dichromates (or any chromium vi compounds) should be used with caution but they have nothing whatever to do with cyanotypes. The only potential hazard is if you mix the hexacyanoferrate (ferricyanide) with a fairly concentrated strong acid - not something that can happen by accident.
The only problem with the process is that the lack of sensitivity means that unless you have a large format camera (and I'm only assuming that would work) you need to print a negative onto acetate and then use that 1:1 with the paper.
It's great fun though and the fact that you don't need a darkroom or any special facilities is a real plus on the accessibility front.
Best place to start is alternativephotography.com. Give it a go.
Cheers,
Chris
Good news! I was passing on what my friend had mentioned, but he's a medic not a chemist so I think you win
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Old 16th July 2018
Petrochemist Petrochemist is offline
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Re: Anyone into Cyanotypes ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chrislluk View Post
I've spent quite a bit of time playing with cyanotypes (and have got quite a lot of chemistry classes in Scotland experimenting with it).
As a chemist and H&S professional, I am baffled by the NIOSH report mentioned by Mark above. Dichromates (or any chromium vi compounds) should be used with caution but they have nothing whatever to do with cyanotypes. The only potential hazard is if you mix the hexacyanoferrate (ferricyanide) with a fairly concentrated strong acid - not something that can happen by accident.
The only problem with the process is that the lack of sensitivity means that unless you have a large format camera (and I'm only assuming that would work) you need to print a negative onto acetate and then use that 1:1 with the paper.
It's great fun though and the fact that you don't need a darkroom or any special facilities is a real plus on the accessibility front.
Best place to start is alternativephotography.com. Give it a go.
Cheers,
Chris
I guess it was a knee jerk reaction to having Cyanide in the name. Just the sort of thing that gets 'methyl cyanide' considered more dangerous than 'Acetonitrile' or the better known example of hydrogen monoxide & water...
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