Olympus UK E-System User Group
Olympus UK E-System User Group

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  #1  
Old 10th August 2008
DDOE
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Hello - and a wee bit of advise, please!

Hello all

Just wanted to say hi, and ask you very intelligent folks for your learned advise!

I am a new to D-SLR, and having decided to take the plunge, completed many hours of research on the interweb and in my local LCE, and I finally settled on either an E-420 or an E-520.

My only uncertainities are regarding the lenses. As you probaly know, the 520is available body only; with 15-42; a 15-42 + 40-150 or a 15-42 and a 70-300. The 420 is with similiar, but a 40-150 in a twin lens bundle.

Now, having the advise of the great guy in Jessops ringing in my ears, I don't want to be left with excess lenses. I only really want to do normal photography of the kids, holidays, portraits and landscapes etc, but also want something with a bit of zoom for when you need it. Looking at these lens bundles, and then at the available lenses, I am really smitten with the pancake lens and the 18-180.

So, do I splash out more of my hard earn pennies and buy the kit singley, or do I plump for the bundle with the biggest lens and be done with it? I understand about the different lenses, and what the numbers mean, but I'm not sure if the 180 is enough of a zoom, or the 300 too much?

Do you think the difference between the 420 and the 520 is significant to warrant the price difference, with the only difference being image stabiliser?

Another angle on this is the new 9-18 lens coming out next month - would that be a better alternative to the pancake lens?

Any advise will be greatly received
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  #2  
Old 10th August 2008
bully74uk bully74uk is offline
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Re: Hello - and a wee bit of advise, please!

Hi, and welcome to the forum.

I am relatively new here and new to photography and this is a great forum for all things Olympus.

I can't comment on the Pancake lens as I know nothing about it but what I can safely say is that the Olympus kit lenses are better than any other kit lenses provided by other manufacturers.

I bought an E510 with twin kit lenses 14-42 and 40-150. My previous bridge camera covered up to 420mm equiv compared to 300mm that I have at full telephoto from the 40-150 yet I don't really miss not having the extra bit of zoom.

I think if you were interested in wildlife photography then you would might want to look at one of the bigger lenses but as you are new to DSLR and only looking to take 'normal' photos, kids, holidays etc then you wouldn't go far wrong with the twin lens kit as I have got.

They are both small lenses and are capable of some very good shots.

Whatever you decide im sure you will be very happy with your purchase and be sure to post some shots taken with your new camera on here. The forum is a friendly place and your pictures will be appreciated by other members and im sure you will receive some very constructive comments.

Regards,
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Old 11th August 2008
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Re: Hello - and a wee bit of advise, please!

My advice would be to go for the E-520 with the 14-42, 40-150, and 70-300. You've got everything covered in three light lenses. The IS is invaluable and well worth the money.
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Old 11th August 2008
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Re: Hello - and a wee bit of advise, please!

First off Welcome. Sorry to add to the confusion, but there is no one simple solution so you must compromise somewhere. A 12-60 & 70-300 looks good but there is an issue with the smaller apertures available at the long end of both of these lenses, and the 12-60 is quite expensive.

The 9-18 & 18-180 will give you a massive range and later add a 1.4 converter or get the 70-300 if you really want the extra tele.

The 520 is absolutly brilliant the IS is fantastic, so hand held, low light and slow shutter is available again.

If you are not pressed for time then a 14-54 & 70-300 combination from ebay may well be your best option.

Keep us informed on which way you went and post the results.

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Old 11th August 2008
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Re: Hello - and a wee bit of advise, please!

Welcome!

If you are starting out with a DSLR, I would go for the 14-42 and 14-150. Both are surprisingly capable and will serve you well while you are learning the camera and (presumably) DSLR photography. They are also very light weight and small in size. You will almost certainly find your interests and what you want to photograph changing over time, and it would be better to make an informed choice later, rather than trying to guess now. For now, put the money you would spend on more lenses on a good tripod (and, as you mention landscape, a circular polarising filter).

I would go unhesitatingly for the E520 as IS is really quite a big deal and the fact it is "in body" is undoubtedly one of the USPs of the E System. What this means is that it works with any lens that can be fitted to the body - including the huge range of manual, legacy lenses that can be pickled up ridiculously cheaply if you don't mind manual focus. Being able to work a couple of stops slower than you would otherwise makes a really big difference as probably more images are spoilt by camera shake than anything else...

By the by, the guy in Jessops may be great, but you may well be able to find a better deal elsewhere if you shop around.
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Old 11th August 2008
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Re: Hello - and a wee bit of advise, please!

Welcome to the forum. Lots have people have already given you good advice and I would second the E520 as being the better buy. IS is essential if you wish to use long lenses on anything but a bright, sunny day!

The Zuiko Kit lenses are exceptional value for money and do give a good coverage on focal lengths. For what you have suggested as being your needs at this time, I would suggest that these are all you will need. Once you have experienced using them and your ambitions change, then would be the best time to consider wider angle lenses and longer focal length lenses.

Good luck with your choice and good shooting.

Peter
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  #7  
Old 11th August 2008
DDOE
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Smile Re: Hello - and a wee bit of advise, please!

Thanks for all of your advice - it has all been most helpful. I have plumped for the 14-40 and the 40-150 bundle to start with, and can assess things in the future.

Out of curiousity, are there any shops you would recommend? I haven't found cheaper than Bristol Cameras on the net, and I can't find the ebay shop that has been mentioned, Kerso, is it?

Many thanks

David
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Old 11th August 2008
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Re: Hello - and a wee bit of advise, please!

David,

Ian Kerr can be contacted at: 2kerso@gmail.com .

Contact him by e-mail and get a quote for what you require. It is always cheaper than buying through his ebay shop. I have found him to be reliable and competetive.

Good luck

Peter
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Old 11th August 2008
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Re: Hello - and a wee bit of advise, please!

Hi, and welcome.

I can't speak as any sort of expert on either of the cameras, and they really are quite different. I'm still happy with my E-400, mainly because I like the size and shape, although sometimes I wonder what it would be like to have a camera with IS I haven't yet been convinced I should part with the necessary cash.

I think it usually works out cheaper to buy a camera with a lens rather than getting one separately, but it depends on how much money you can spend. The kit lenses are very good, small and light too. I'm happy enough with the 14-42 and 40-150 and have also got the 70-300, but the more expensive lenses are faster, which can be a bonus in poor light.

It might also be worth your while discussing prices with your LCE manager, they'll often match, or nearly match, online prices. They certainly have with my purchases.
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Old 12th August 2008
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Re: Hello - and a wee bit of advise, please!

My understanding was that Kerso ships from the USA is that correct ?

If so, am I also correct to advise David that should he purchase from Kerso his camera and kit lenses would only be covered by 12 months warranty instead of 24 ?

Not intending to put him off using Kerso as ive heard his prices are very good (may buy a Macro lens from him myself), just making sure he has all the facts.

Regards,
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Old 13th August 2008
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Re: Hello - and a wee bit of advise, please!

Ian actually ships his goods from Scotland, which is not yet part of the USA, (therefore quick delivery), but I think he may source them from the US, in which case you are correct about the warranty period. However, my experience is that if something of this nature is going to go wrong, it will either do so in the first three months or after several years.
Ian Kerr is certainly reputable - I have spent a couple of thousand with him over the last few years with no hassle at all.

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Originally Posted by bully74uk View Post
My understanding was that Kerso ships from the USA is that correct ?

If so, am I also correct to advise David that should he purchase from Kerso his camera and kit lenses would only be covered by 12 months warranty instead of 24 ?


Regards,
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Old 13th August 2008
bully74uk bully74uk is offline
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Re: Hello - and a wee bit of advise, please!

Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenL View Post
Ian actually ships his goods from Scotland, which is not yet part of the USA, (therefore quick delivery), but I think he may source them from the US, in which case you are correct about the warranty period. However, my experience is that if something of this nature is going to go wrong, it will either do so in the first three months or after several years.
Ian Kerr is certainly reputable - I have spent a couple of thousand with him over the last few years with no hassle at all.
As I said, not intending to put th OP off from using Kerso. I have read many good reports from customers of his, I was simply highlighting the warranty difference.
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