Olympus UK E-System User Group

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-   Nostalgia Nexus - early and pre-digital discussion (http://e-group.uk.net/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=62)
-   -   Test Of Time (http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=46672)

Zuiko 23rd November 2017 08:11 PM

Test Of Time
 
I recently asked my Mum for some suggestions of what I could get her for Christmas. After some thought she said she would like me to scan some of Dad's old slides, print them and put in an album - you know, like we all did before we embraced the digital revolution that confined our images to pixels on hard drives.

The very first slide was a family photograph of my parents, my sister and me - aged I would guess about 4 or 5, which dates the Kodachrome slide to about 1959 or 1960. The date is not printed on the card mount, so I guess it was before Kodak started that practise. There appears to have been little degradation of the film emulsion over all those years and the colours have lasted remarkably well - which is more than can be said of the subjects! Mum is now 90, my sister 58 and myself 62 - all showing advance stages of wear and tear! Dad sadly passed away 15 years ago, but he is still with us through his old slides, which I anticipate are going to provide us with a wonderful trip down Memory Lane.

http://www.e-group.uk.net/gallery/da...4_01_FORUM.jpg

Bikie John 23rd November 2017 08:21 PM

Re: Test Of Time
 
Marvellous to be able to bring the past back so vividly, John - I'll bet you're chuffed.

John

pdk42 23rd November 2017 08:24 PM

Re: Test Of Time
 
That's a great shot John and a perfect example of how film emulsion is a good archival medium. I sometimes doubt whether we'll be able to read our ORF files in 6 years, let alone 60!

Simon Bee 23rd November 2017 09:37 PM

Re: Test Of Time
 
Wonderful*yes

Kodachrome was such a fantastic film and it's archival properties are the stuff of legends as the colours in your scan show.

I am sure your mum will be thrilled John.

Simon

Simon Bee 23rd November 2017 09:39 PM

Re: Test Of Time
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by pdk42 (Post 433648)
a perfect example of how film emulsion is a good archival medium. I sometimes doubt whether we'll be able to read our ORF files in 6 years, let alone 60!

Quite Paul, it's partly why I shoot film and digital 'side by side'.

Simon

pdk42 23rd November 2017 10:04 PM

Re: Test Of Time
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Simon Bee (Post 433662)
Quite Paul, it's partly why I shoot film and digital 'side by side'.

Simon

I've dabbled with some film shooting in the last few months using HP5 or FP4 with my OM-1. I've been a bit disappointed with the results TBH. The biggest problem has been dust and drying marks, but the vaguarities of scanning come a close second! I'll persevere I think, probably putting more effort into my developing technique and ditching the Plustek scanner for some method using my E-M1 + macro lens to capture the negative.

Ricoh 23rd November 2017 10:12 PM

Re: Test Of Time
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by pdk42 (Post 433667)
I've dabbled with some film shooting in the last few months using HP5 or FP4 with my OM-1. I've been a bit disappointed with the results TBH. The biggest problem has been dust and drying marks, but the vaguarities of scanning come a close second! I'll persevere I think, probably putting more effort into my developing technique and ditching the Plustek scanner for some method using my E-M1 + macro lens to capture the negative.

Paul, I haven't forgotten, I'll post something soon. Just been a bit busy of late and my copying kit has been boxed up to keep the wife happy.
I was lucky not owning a macro lens in the sense I had the opportunity to explore other options. Reading around I was convinced an enlarger lens is ideal for photographing the 2D negative (or transparency).

Ricoh 23rd November 2017 10:17 PM

Re: Test Of Time
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Simon Bee (Post 433662)
Quite Paul, it's partly why I shoot film and digital 'side by side'.

Simon

Without getting into a debate about digital v film, I like film because it renders differently, I like the imperfections and the unpredictability. So much to explore, push processing, cross processing transparency to C41, and so many B&W emulsions to explore. I just wish I had the space for a permanent dark room, I'd love it.

Simon Bee 23rd November 2017 10:28 PM

Re: Test Of Time
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by pdk42 (Post 433667)
I've dabbled with some film shooting in the last few months using HP5 or FP4 with my OM-1. I've been a bit disappointed with the results TBH. The biggest problem has been dust and drying marks, but the vaguarities of scanning come a close second! I'll persevere I think, probably putting more effort into my developing technique and ditching the Plustek scanner for some method using my E-M1 + macro lens to capture the negative.

Yeah, dust and drying marks have always been a bugbear and ' top quality' scanning costs ... i.e. drum scanner such as Hasselblad Flextight ... seriously expensive but wonderful. Nikon coolscan 5000 or 9000 come a close(ish ) second but are no longer supported by Nikon and are serious bucks considering the lack of support and their age.

Copying via your E-M1 and a macro, better still 'enlarger' lens is a good option and the very one I'm looking into albeit using the Pen-F. Of course Steve ( Ricoh ) has already started a thread on this and his results thus far are very promising.

Simon

Zuiko 24th November 2017 05:51 AM

Re: Test Of Time
 
I use an Epson v500 scanner, which achieves surprisingly good results for comparatively little money. The big downside is the dust, but I guess that is a problem with any film copying method. I can easily spend an hour in pp just dust spotting one image and it makes me appreciate how frustrating it must be to use a Canon or Nikon DSLR! Once this hurdle has been cleared, however, I am able to produce excellent prints from the scans, up to 12x8 from 135 film or 16x12 from 120 film.

pdk42 24th November 2017 07:29 AM

Re: Test Of Time
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ricoh (Post 433669)
Paul, I haven't forgotten, I'll post something soon. Just been a bit busy of late and my copying kit has been boxed up to keep the wife happy.
I was lucky not owning a macro lens in the sense I had the opportunity to explore other options. Reading around I was convinced an enlarger lens is ideal for photographing the 2D negative (or transparency).

Thanks Steve - but please don't think my post was me nagging!!

Ricoh 24th November 2017 08:59 AM

Re: Test Of Time
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Zuiko (Post 433688)
I use an Epson v500 scanner, which achieves surprisingly good results for comparatively little money. The big downside is the dust, but I guess that is a problem with any film copying method. I can easily spend an hour in pp just dust spotting one image and it makes me appreciate how frustrating it must be to use a Canon or Nikon DSLR! Once this hurdle has been cleared, however, I am able to produce excellent prints from the scans, up to 12x8 from 135 film or 16x12 from 120 film.

I recently showed the results from 'camera scanning' negs using the EM5. I'm basically using a vertical copying stand, an enlarger lens, light source and camera. Quick blow with the rocket and Bob's your uncle. No dust spotting in PP, absolutely none.

OM USer 24th November 2017 09:03 AM

Re: Test Of Time
 
Fantastic memories. Glad to see the the prints still surviving.

Ian 24th November 2017 09:40 AM

Re: Test Of Time
 
My father passed away last week, almost exactly three years after suffering a massive stroke that left him severely disabled. One reason why I am so interested in photography was because of him. He shot 35mm half frame trabsparencies and there are many boxes of his slides waiting to be explored. As the family lived for periods of over a year or so in three different Far Eastern countries (Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines) I'm keen to re-live the family slide shows we used to hold and to remember some of the fantastic places I visited and called home as a child.

John's great example, here, has inspired me further :) As there are literally hundreds, maybe over a thousand, slides, I will probably hire a Reflecta automatic slide scanner (about 100 for a week, which I think is good for a scanner than costs 1200 new). I believe it has hardware detection dust removal (aka ICE), which is a bonus. I have several Braun Paximat rotary carousels, which the Reflacta can take, and I will be able to scan some of my own slides as well.

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/511/img002.jpg

Here's one of me from the late 70s, poor colour, sadly, but a good memory nonethless!

Ian

Ian 24th November 2017 09:42 AM

Re: Test Of Time
 
John, I'm guessing your photo was taken with a roll film camera? Probably a Kodak of some description? Or maybe not I read you say it was mounted!

Ian


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