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-   -   Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread (http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=42101)

art frames 4th May 2016 01:48 PM

Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
This thread is to run alongside the previous communal natural history threads which have been running now for several months on birds and insect life. It comes out of a request on those threads to include other areas of nature.

The aim is for anyone to join in and post their pictures of flowers, trees, plants and fungi for general enjoyment and discussion. So please join in, share images, poems, or add your comment and share your thoughts in a communal, supportive place.

You don't have to be a committed flower photographer - everybody is welcome to contribute if they have a photograph which they are proud of (or disappointed with and would like some advice). It will be fun to learn about plants from around the world, botanical collections or from your garden.

So have a root about on your hard drive and show us what you've got.

*chr*chr

To start us off I love this time of year for the wonderful blossom, bluebells and catkins

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7382/...4dbc3c30_b.jpg
Blossom
by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7723/...b4f4bda8_b.jpg
Blossom and Bluebells
by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

Ross the fiddler 4th May 2016 02:37 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
A close look at a Kenilworth Ivy flower (Cymbalaria muralis, with common names ivy-leaved toadflax,[2] Kenilworth ivy,[3] coliseum ivy,[3] Oxford ivy,[3] mother of thousands,[3] pennywort,[3] wandering sailor,[3] is a flowering plant native to Mediterranean Europe and widely naturalised elsewhere.).

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/505/M5016181-s.jpg

Focus Stacked in camera, E-M1 & 60mm macro lens.

art frames 4th May 2016 02:46 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Hi Ross, had to look it up as I recognised the flower but not the name. I read it has several names including Toadflax which is more familiar to me.

With my EM5 mk2 I don't get the in camera focus stack. I would use it all the time! It does seem to work well.

Thanks for joining in.

art frames 4th May 2016 03:55 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Do you have any bluebells?

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/P5081712-2.jpg

Harold Gough 4th May 2016 04:19 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by art frames (Post 385080)
Hi Ross, had to look it up as I recognised the flower but not the name. I read it has several names including Toadflax which is more familiar to me.

If you see caterpillars which look similar to those of the Large White butterfly, take a closer look:

http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=39511

Harold

Harold Gough 4th May 2016 06:42 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Abutilon vitifolia 'Flowering Maple'.

This is one of the mallow family, together with Hollyhocks. It makes a tallish (2-3m) spindly shrub, which whips around a lot in the wind. It was a windy day and I was standing on a stool to get this flower to fill and effective 210mm frame. I had to wait for calmer moments.

My regular software is out of action but I am happy to post this version, uncropped.

EM-1, Aperture priority, f11?, 1/500, ISO 500, hand-held.

Harold


http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/ufi...?ts=1462386911

David M 4th May 2016 09:36 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/ftbl2.jpg

Foxtail Barley detail, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Ross the fiddler 4th May 2016 10:55 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by art frames (Post 385080)
Hi Ross, had to look it up as I recognised the flower but not the name. I read it has several names including Toadflax which is more familiar to me.

With my EM5 mk2 I don't get the in camera focus stack. I would use it all the time! It does seem to work well.

Thanks for joining in.

Thanks, I've now edited it so that all the names are covered. :D I should have included the botanical name though. :rolleyes: While it's not a native in Australia it grows & spreads rather well here & some people rip it out as a weed, but we love it. It can be pulled up easily (but may grow back readily perhaps :rolleyes: ) & it sneaks inside through door & window cracks, but it is so delicate & lovely we don't mind. *yes

*chr

Harold Gough 5th May 2016 05:35 AM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ross the fiddler (Post 385131)
Thanks, I've now edited it so that all the names are covered. :D I should have included the botanical name though. :rolleyes: While it's not a native in Australia it grows & spreads rather well here & some people rip it out as a weed, but we love it. It can be pulled up easily (but may grow back readily perhaps :rolleyes: ) & it sneaks inside through door & window cracks, but it is so delicate & lovely we don't mind. *yes

*chr

Purple Toadflax grows in our garden each year. It never spreads much but is always present and we find it attractive, as do bees.

Harold

art frames 5th May 2016 06:23 AM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Harold Gough (Post 385103)
Abutilon vitifolia 'Flowering Maple'.

This is one of the mallow family, together with Hollyhocks. It makes a tallish (2-3m) spindly shrub, which whips around a lot in the wind. It was a windy day and I was standing on a stool to get this flower to fill and effective 210mm frame. I had to wait for calmer moments.

My regular software is out of action but I am happy to post this version, uncropped.

EM-1, Aperture priority, f11?, 1/500, ISO 500, hand-held.

Harold


http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/ufi...?ts=1462386911

Harold, a stunning looking flower. Well worth the effort.

art frames 5th May 2016 06:27 AM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ross the fiddler (Post 385131)
Thanks, I've now edited it so that all the names are covered. :D I should have included the botanical name though. :rolleyes: While it's not a native in Australia it grows & spreads rather well here & some people rip it out as a weed, but we love it. It can be pulled up easily (but may grow back readily perhaps :rolleyes: ) & it sneaks inside through door & window cracks, but it is so delicate & lovely we don't mind. *yes

*chr

Hi Ross,

That is very kind to go the extra mile for us. I personally learned something and look forward to seeing this in the wild.

Hope to see some more native Australian stuff as we go. Have always enjoyed those posted elsewhere on the board and hope to get some more here.

*chr

art frames 5th May 2016 06:30 AM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by David M (Post 385126)
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/ftbl2.jpg

Foxtail Barley detail, Saskatchewan, Canada.

David

Very beautiful. Looks like it might come alive with 3D specs. :)

I will start a mammals and others thread shortly. I am thinking up an all inclusive title (ensuring we get everything covered).

In the meantime keep them coming.

Harold Gough 5th May 2016 06:41 AM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by art frames (Post 385143)
Harold, a stunning looking flower. Well worth the effort.

Thanks, Peter.

My favourite colour. These were the first of the season, right at the top. There will be plenty more, but further down, with no chance of a blue sky background.

Harold

Harold Gough 5th May 2016 06:44 AM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by David M (Post 385126)
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/ftbl2.jpg

Foxtail Barley detail, Saskatchewan, Canada.

David,

A lovely blend of abstract and impressionist.

Harold

David M 5th May 2016 10:39 AM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by art frames (Post 385146)
David

Very beautiful. Looks like it might come alive with 3D specs. :)

I will start a mammals and others thread shortly. I am thinking up an all inclusive title (ensuring we get everything covered).

In the meantime keep them coming.

I was thinking Communal flora and Communal fauna.

Harold Gough 5th May 2016 11:12 AM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by David M (Post 385155)
I was thinking Communal flora and Communal fauna.

It depends whether insects are to remain separate, as they as fauna. And where would molluscs go?

I suppose flora would include mushrooms and moulds but some guidance might be required for for the uninitiated.

Harold

David M 5th May 2016 09:13 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Harold Gough (Post 385161)
It depends whether insects are to remain separate, as they as fauna. And where would molluscs go?

I suppose flora would include mushrooms and moulds but some guidance might be required for for the uninitiated.

Harold

I realised there could be some confusion and overlap but was trying to come up with something short. Communal mammals, reptiles, amphibians and so on gets a bit of a mouthful.

Ross the fiddler 5th May 2016 10:25 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by David M (Post 385232)
I realised there could be some confusion and overlap but was trying to come up with something short. Communal mammals, reptiles, amphibians and so on gets a bit of a mouthful.

We could make it even more interesting. Invertebrates & Vertebrates. :rolleyes:

Quote:

Vertebrates include the jawless fish and the jawed vertebrates, which include the cartilaginous fish (sharks and rays) and the bony fish. A bony fish clade known as the lobe-finned fishes is included with tetrapods, which are further divided into amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and birds. Extant vertebrates range in size from the frog species Paedophryne amauensis, at as little as 7.7 mm (0.30 in), to the blue whale, at up to 33 m (108 ft). Vertebrates make up about 4% of all described animal species; the rest are invertebrates, which lack vertebral columns.
:D

*chr

art frames 6th May 2016 03:17 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/477/1...f061aaa0_b.jpg
Pyramidal Orchid
by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

Pyramidal Orchid - Anacamptis Pyramidalis: picture taken at Ragpits Reserve in herts. A superb small site with good access to orchids.

art frames 6th May 2016 03:18 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/324/1...fd07829d_b.jpg

Bee Orchid
by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

Bee Orchid - Ophrys apifera, growing near Tring in herts.

Harold Gough 6th May 2016 03:23 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Peter,

Lovely groups of three.

A typo: Anacamptis pyramidalis

Harold

brian1208 6th May 2016 07:04 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by art frames (Post 385271)
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/324/1...fd07829d_b.jpg

Bee Orchid
by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

Bee Orchid - Ophrys apifera, growing near Tring in herts.

Lucky you, its one species of orchid I've yet to find, nice detailed and colourful pic too

David M 6th May 2016 09:58 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/8052180.jpg

Cone flower, E-3 and a Vivitar 35mm f/1.9 from the late 70's.

Harold Gough 7th May 2016 07:02 AM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Harold Gough (Post 385103)
Abutilon vitifolia 'Flowering Maple'.

This is one of the mallow family, together with Hollyhocks. It makes a tallish (2-3m) spindly shrub, which whips around a lot in the wind. It was a windy day and I was standing on a stool to get this flower to fill and effective 210mm frame. I had to wait for calmer moments.

My regular software is out of action but I am happy to post this version, uncropped.

EM-1, Aperture priority, f11?, 1/500, ISO 500, hand-held.

Harold


http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/ufi...?ts=1462386911

For comparison, here are some shots from the same viewpoint but with the sun almost directly behind the flower. Movement of the flower in the wind varies the lighting.

Harold

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/ufiles/38/1295338.jpg

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/ufiles/35/1295335.jpg

art frames 8th May 2016 04:05 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by David M (Post 385298)
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/8052180.jpg

Cone flower, E-3 and a Vivitar 35mm f/1.9 from the late 70's.

Lovely plants and flowers and good for butterflies, but I can't seem to get them to grow back in the second year. I believe I have brown fingers.

art frames 8th May 2016 04:07 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Seemed to be better in black and white...

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7266/...7d6ba1ae_b.jpg
Dandelion clock
by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

Harold Gough 10th May 2016 06:35 AM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
First stereos with Laowa 15mm 1:1 macro lens. A Tree Paeony 'Pink' (not that I can see!).

Yesterday morning was perfect for this exercise. There was bright overcast light, with enough diffusion to be shadowless for this subject.

A session on the previous day gave me problems with the camera and/or my head casting shadows over the flower. While it might have been OK for a singles frame, the sideways movement for the other view was not.

Yes, the background is far from picturesque but the likes of this hand-sized flower were not to be readily found elsewhere. In any case, it shows the scope of the lens. I believe that it is to be objects of this size which are likely to give the huge DOF characteristic of this lens.

I do not want to suggest that the lens is a go-to one for macro. For most subjects, a telephoto which separates the lens from the background is the best choice. But we must "think outside the box" at times.

Ideally, I would have used a tripod but I would not usually for stereo pairs, so they were hand-held (kneeling with firm grip on camera and elbows on knee).

I am showing the second session first. The stereograms are cross-eye so I also provide some single images for those who cannot make the former work. (They have had some micro contrast processing which the stereo versions have not).

Sony Alpha A7R (Full frame, Aperture priority), ISO 800, f22, 1/160, 1/200. etc..

Harold


http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/ufi...?ts=1462860658


http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/ufi...?ts=1462861458


http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/ufi...?ts=1462860658


http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/ufi...?ts=1462861458

art frames 10th May 2016 07:59 AM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
An impressive flower, Harold. The lens is interesting. I am sure at the size you get to see it the sharpness and impact will be dramatic.

The only peonies I know are herbaceous and my one is very pink, very double and loved by earwigs. It also falls over when it gets wet. So I should begin to stake it now as it has flower buds forming.

Well yes you do get a good depth of field and I imagine you need to work very hard to avoid feet and shadows creeping into shot. But I like the wide angle shot for flowers. I don't have a macro one but I find the 4/3 7-14 works well on fuchsias and I have had some joy with clematis.

I started to look out some examples. It does give an interesting view. I tend to develop them with negative contrast, presence and sharpness to get effects, but they can be quite sharp.

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7224/...0b498379_b.jpg
Clematis montana
by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7454/...b5c8b17c_b.jpg
Clematis
by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7287/...a480af45_b.jpg
Berry hedgerow
by Peter Willmott, on Flickr

I think you have given me some challenges with flowers again. *chr

Harold Gough 10th May 2016 08:12 AM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Thanks, Peter.

Nice examples.

Negative contrast and presence are unfamiliar to me.

Harold

art frames 10th May 2016 09:06 AM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Harold Gough (Post 385559)
Thanks, Peter.

Nice examples.

Negative contrast and presence are unfamiliar to me.

Harold

Probably wise as you will spend a lot of time fiddling with processing Raw.

You can process in ways which make things less contrasty which tends to flatten the tonal range and remove harsh edges. Similarly you can reduce the presence (clarity and colour vibrance) in a number of ways. If you do it in subtle ways and in selected areas you can chose the areas of focus by reducing the viewers interest in the non focus areas. Selective sharpening can also be helpful but only if well managed. I find most sharpening is used harshly.

The end result should not look processed. I am not looking to create unreality.

My training is as an artist / illustrator. And a painter I select exactly how I want you to view an image by composition, paint quality and edge treatment (amongst other techniques). I simply use the same thinking when I develop a photograph. Changing the content and composition at the taking stage, if possible and then developing in ways which help it later on. In the end all there is is the image. That is all you are exhibiting.

Interestingly I paint less now than I did - but still do both. But people viewing drawings and paintings are more impressed than with photographs. I think it is assumed that there is less skill, because the machine takes the image.

Harold Gough 10th May 2016 09:15 AM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by art frames (Post 385566)
Probably wise as you will spend a lot of time fiddling with processing Raw.

You can process in ways which make things less contrasty which tends to flatten the tonal range and remove harsh edges. Similarly you can reduce the presence (clarity and colour vibrance) in a number of ways. If you do it in subtle ways and in selected areas you can chose the areas of focus by reducing the viewers interest in the non focus areas. Selective sharpening can also be helpful but only if well managed. I find most sharpening is used harshly.

The end result should not look processed. I am not looking to create unreality.

My training is as an artist / illustrator. And a painter I select exactly how I want you to view an image by composition, paint quality and edge treatment (amongst other techniques). I simply use the same thinking when I develop a photograph. Changing the content and composition at the taking stage, if possible and then developing in ways which help it later on. In the end all there is is the image. That is all you are exhibiting.

Interestingly I paint less now than I did - but still do both. But people viewing drawings and paintings are more impressed than with photographs. I think it is assumed that there is less skill, because the machine takes the image.

Thanks, Peter,

Not my usual scene, although I have softened images on occasion.

I abandoned Unsharp Mask years ago because it is so coarse. I am using Smart Sharpen and High Pass at times.

Harold

Harold Gough 11th May 2016 09:01 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
I just got my processing software working again.

Here are the first and second images more like I intended, if a little over-sharpened.

Harold

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/ufiles/75/1297675.jpg

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/ufiles/77/1297677.jpg

wornish 13th May 2016 05:34 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
The little blue flower appeared on this pink cactus like plant overnight. I have no idea what kind of plant this is I think it is very pretty.

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/1...ink-Cactus.jpg

Harold Gough 13th May 2016 06:23 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by wornish (Post 385805)
The little blue flower appeared on this pink cactus like plant overnight. I have no idea what kind of plant this is I think it is very pretty.

It is Tillandsia cyanea, a bromeliad (pineapple family). They naturally live as epiphytes, up on the branches of trees in the forest.

Harold

art frames 13th May 2016 07:40 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by wornish (Post 385805)
The little blue flower appeared on this pink cactus like plant overnight. I have no idea what kind of plant this is I think it is very pretty.

Hi Dave, absolutely lovely. And I personally would love to see some pictures of your Wisteria which although out of focus looks to be in full bloom, as is my own.

I have to climb on the garden bench to photograph mine. Yours looks to flower lower down. So not so much mountaineering involved in some creative shots.

keep them coming..*chr

art frames 13th May 2016 07:46 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Harold Gough (Post 385673)
I just got my processing software working again.

Here are the first and second images more like I intended, if a little over-sharpened.

Harold

Nice...but still not pink ...I can make it pink if you'd like...you just have to embarrass her ...you have missed the official naked gardening day but that would work. :o

wornish 13th May 2016 09:26 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by art frames (Post 385816)
Hi Dave, absolutely lovely. And I personally would love to see some pictures of your Wisteria which although out of focus looks to be in full bloom, as is my own.

I have to climb on the garden bench to photograph mine. Yours looks to flower lower down. So not so much mountaineering involved in some creative shots.

keep them coming..*chr

I wish it was mine !
The picture was taken in longueville manor, Jersey, where we stayed for a few days this week.
I will post more pics of the wisteria later.

wornish 13th May 2016 09:47 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
Wisteria on the front of Longueville Manor Jersey. On a rainy day.

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/1...eria-small.jpg

Imageryone 13th May 2016 10:52 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
A few from Imageryone Reserve, :)

Common Dandelion

http://i223.photobucket.com/albums/d...pshworbs05.jpg

Red Cherry blossom

http://i223.photobucket.com/albums/d...psu7asa8uh.jpg

White Dead Nettle

http://i223.photobucket.com/albums/d...psm4jf747a.jpg

Yellow Archangel

http://i223.photobucket.com/albums/d...pstojv364t.jpg

Ross the fiddler 13th May 2016 11:07 PM

Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread
 
*note
Quote:

Originally Posted by art frames (Post 385816)
Hi Dave, absolutely lovely. And I personally would love to see some pictures of your Wisteria which although out of focus looks to be in full bloom, as is my own.

I have to climb on the garden bench to photograph mine. Yours looks to flower lower down. So not so much mountaineering involved in some creative shots.

keep them coming..*chr

I'll have to take to some photos of the walkways in Buttonshaw Park, Springwood covered in wisteria when they come out in flower next spring (downunder). I will have to make sure no child is in the photo though, or some paranoid parent might get upset. :rolleyes:

*chr


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