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View Full Version : HELP! Lens hoods for micro 4/3rds


padgreen
25th May 2010, 07:08 PM
Hi

This may be a silly question, but do lenses for micro 4/3rd's have lens hoods? I've been looking at the Four-thirds.org & Olympus websites and hoods are listed for all the Panasonic lenses except the 20 mm Pancake yet this is not so with the Olympus offerings: I was rather surprised to see this.

The reason for asking is that I'm considering a micro 4/3rd's as a carry round for when I don't want to carry my E30 but I can't imagine using a lens without a hood for all the obvious reasons.

So is this correct and is so, can anyone who has got one comment whether this is an issue.

Thanks.

forester
25th May 2010, 07:21 PM
I have the Panasonic G1 and the 14-45 lens also the 45-200 both have hoods and I would not like to, not have them on to protect the lens while waving it about and most important to prevent lens flare.
If Olympus have left them off their Micro fourthirds variants I canít understand why.
Perhaps someone can say why?:confused:
Regards
Richard
*chr

StephenL
26th May 2010, 07:03 AM
As an E-P2 owner, I too am a little uneasy about using my lenses without hoods.

However, I am doing so and am cautiously optimistic about the results. There's not as much flare as I expected, maybe down to the lens construction.

I am wary about banging the lens.

I suppose a reason not to have hoods is that they do add considerable bulk to a lens, which is against m4/3 ideals.

Rod Souter
26th May 2010, 07:44 AM
I have the Panasonic 20mm, it came without a hood!

I purchased a collapsible rubber hood from Premier.

There are Leica style metal hoods available on e-bay.

HTH

Rod

padgreen
26th May 2010, 10:39 AM
I think the 20 mm pancake is the only Panasonic micro 4/3rd lens without a hood.

Certainly lens hoods add some bulk but unless it's a huge lens not that much bulk. Maybe it's something to do with the fact that Olympus micro 4/3rd lenses collapse on themselves like a compact camera lens does? So if you're moving up to Olympus micro 4/3rds from a compact camera then probably you won't notice the omission.

However, if you are used to using hoods then, I guess you will. For me, this makes me lean more to buying a Panasonic GF1 instead of the EP2, although I'd prefer in body IS, because the Panasonic seem more like proper lenses.

mike_j
26th May 2010, 05:18 PM
I have the Panasonic 20mm, it came without a hood!

I purchased a collapsible rubber hood from Premier.

There are Leica style metal hoods available on e-bay.

HTH

Rod

I expect you mean the vented hoods. These are used on Leicas and other rangefinders with some lenses, especially wide angle, so you can see through the hood, otherwise they block the viewfinder to an unacceptable degree. Most genuine Leica hoods are rectangular but use a dedicated fitting on the lens so the orientation is correct. The vented style lets you use the screw in filter thread.

On a through the lens viewing system where there is no viewfinder to block I think you are better off with a rubber collapsible hood.

padgreen
27th May 2010, 02:55 PM
Having looked at a GF1 today, I decided I won't bother with micro 4/3rd's for a while, the plug in EVF was dreadful and it costs £180. I think they must be a having a laugh. The Olympus EVF is miles better but I wasn't hugely impressed with that either.

Trouble is I want a carry round camera. I should have bought a E600 when they were going for £300. Oh well.

forester
27th May 2010, 03:15 PM
hi, If you don't want "Video" the Panasonic G1 is not a bad price.
Also the same sensor as the 600/620.
It's just a thought ;)
regards
Richard

StephenL
27th May 2010, 03:31 PM
As a user of both the Oly E-30 and E-P2, I can tell you that in "real world" use the EVF is at least the equal of the OVF, with bags more information available and ideal for manual focussing. :)

padgreen
27th May 2010, 03:32 PM
Thanks for the thought, but I'm going to wait and see what gets released later on in the year unless I see a reasonably priced second hand E600/E620. The E600 was a steal at £300 and I should have bought one when I had the chance. That said, the idea of a micro 4/3rd camera with plug in viewfinder works for me, as a concept, as it makes the camera smaller. It's just I don't particularly like the EVF's I've looked at, I think they need to get much better before I'd buy one.

padgreen
27th May 2010, 03:40 PM
Stephen, which do you use more your E30 or the EP2?

StephenL
27th May 2010, 04:13 PM
I took both cameras on holiday last week. Never unpacked the E-30. Never used it since I bought the E-P2. That's not to say I won't, but for 95% of my photography the E-P2 is ideal. However, I will concede that for considered, pre-planned shots, the E-30 is more suitable.

Stephen, which do you use more your E30 or the EP2?

padgreen
27th May 2010, 04:24 PM
Sorry, another question. Do you use just the micro 4/3rd lenses on the EP2 or do you also use your normal 4/3rd ones as well?

Thanks.

StephenL
27th May 2010, 05:43 PM
I started off with the kit 14-42, and also used the ZD 9-18 and the f4 40-150.

I also tried the 70-300 and the 12-60 with varying lack of success.

I now have the 17mm and mZD 9-18. Both fantastic lenses.

Another good lens which is easy to use is the Zuiko OM 50mm.

I had considered getting a Mk2 14-54 after trying the Mk1 and finding focussing too slow, but in reality the kit 14-42, though not as solidly built, gives good results.

I also own the Panasonic 45-200, but find the Oly 40-150 much better, and even with an adaptor, lighter and easier to handle.

Sorry, another question. Do you use just the micro 4/3rd lenses on the EP2 or do you also use your normal 4/3rd ones as well?

Thanks.