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chrism_scotland
23rd April 2010, 02:33 PM
I'm looking to get myself a new DSLR after having to get rid of my E620 and then A700 in January.

I'm looking for some advice on lenses, my main type of photography is landscapes / buildings but I also have a passion for planes!!

Now to begin with I'm lucky that I live close to Edinburgh Airport and work next to Heathrow so I'm thinking about commercial jets taking off / landing rather than military jets or airshows but I was wondering what lenses in the Olympus range would offer a decent good value telephoto to give me some nice plane shots?

j.baker
23rd April 2010, 02:39 PM
It depends on how much you can afford.


For plane shotsL
The 70-300 with a good body (E620,E30) gives to good reach and it fairly cheap.

A getter solution would be 50-200mm with an EC14 or an EC-20. with an E30

You will need a lot of light to use Ec-20 or up the ISO to 800-1600.

You can also mount some cameras to various spotter scopes.

For buildings and landscapes.

14-44, 14-54, 12-60 and maybe the 9-18 or 7-14. The standard kits lens are cheap but very good. However I would go for a second hand 14-54 or if you can afford it the 12-60mm.

It all comes down to money :(

chrism_scotland
23rd April 2010, 02:46 PM
Thanks John, I was keen on Nikon but I thought the In Body IS on my old E620 was incredible, and I would miss this on a Nikon.

I liked the 14-54 I had for my E620 but I did find it a little heavy for the body at times so considering an E30 to replace it or more likely another E620 but this time with a grip,

I would love a 7-14mm lens I've heard its one of the best there is for wide angle but the 1200+ price tag is a wee bit much!!!

9 - 18mm though I would really like!

Greytop
23rd April 2010, 03:37 PM
Chris,

Thinking of your aircraft photography, another possibility is the very nice Sigma 70-200 f/2.8 in 4/3 mount, a fair bit cheaper than a 50-200 but optically quality wise extremely close to it.
I've never owned one but know of several users who highly rate the lens. Another plus is that it's a constant f/2.8 throughout the zoom range but of course it's not dust or weather sealed like 50-200.

*chr

Jim Ford
23rd April 2010, 03:39 PM
The 7-14mm is indispensable for aircraft in museums (I'll post some images). Also for buildings like this:

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/509/ovaltine-1024.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/17090)

(I hadn't noticed it was sloping when I first put it in the gallery!)

Jim

j.baker
23rd April 2010, 03:42 PM
If you go for the sigma 70-200 check it before you buy it.

I ordered one two weeks ago (from Amazon), and I found that it was very very soft when used @f2.8. I had to stop it down to F4 or higher to get it sharp. When I took an image of a bright coloured object (flower) @ f2.8 the colour would appear to bleed out.

There are various posts on the QA @ sigma.

Sharon
23rd April 2010, 04:08 PM
I use a 70-300mm with my E-30. I'm getting the 50-200 for my birthday so that I can take it to RIAT. Not sure I can afford the EC14 though! Ah well, there's always Christmas presents! *chr

One of the best pictures I got of a plane was with my 40-150. I was sitting on a wall watching the Kemble Airshow from the cheap seats....otherwise known as a field near my house :) A Eurofighter flew overhead, so low that the sound nearly knocked me off the wall. Try taking a picture, covering your ears and holding onto a wall at the same time LOL. My ears were ringing for days after!

Sharon

Jim Ford
23rd April 2010, 04:38 PM
My ears were ringing for days after!


Hmm, that always used to be reckoned as a sign of permanent ear damage!

Jim

Sharon
23rd April 2010, 05:01 PM
I think they are OK. I've been to louder rock concerts! *chr

Jim Ford
23rd April 2010, 07:07 PM
I think they are OK. I've been to louder rock concerts! *chr

Take care of your ears! When I used to do target shooting regularly, the shooting magazines always warned that (as I said above), if you get ringing in the ears or pain from a loud noise, _permanent_ damage has been caused - no ifs or buts. The insidious bit about it is that problems don't usually show until later in life - as in my case with tinnitus.

There was an item in 'The One Show' during the week about tinnitus and the resident doctor said that lots of youngsters will inevitably get tinnitus later in life from listening to loud music through their mp3 players.

Jim

Sharon
23rd April 2010, 08:21 PM
Perhaps I'll get some earplugs for the Air Tattoo then :) I only use an ipod dock so I'm safe with the Mp3 thing :D

tonton1962
1st July 2010, 04:45 PM
If you go for the sigma 70-200 check it before you buy it.

I ordered one two weeks ago (from Amazon), and I found that it was very very soft when used @f2.8. I had to stop it down to F4 or higher to get it sharp. When I took an image of a bright coloured object (flower) @ f2.8 the colour would appear to bleed out.

There are various posts on the QA @ sigma.

Is this lens a 140-400 in 35mm, in other words the same range as the 50-200?

tonton1962
4th July 2010, 07:01 PM
Just came back from the airshow in Beauvechain, Belgium. Incredible weather, blue skies, etc. My experience with the E3 and 70-300 however has been very disappointing. Of the 300 pictures I took of various propeller and jet aircraft only 3 are sharp and correctly focused. All the other ones are blurry. My settings were C-AF and auto focus was set on the central AF point. All my shots started with focusing on the airplane, and then pressing the shutter for 5 or more consecutive shots. My IS was on 1 meaning horizontal and vertical stabilization, and the shutter speed was always +500, which should be more than enough.
I can only conclude that this lens is not suited for this type of photography. Which is perfectly reasonable considering its low price! Static shots however one can achieve wonderful pictures indeed.
Just my 5 cents worth of experience today.

DerekC
4th July 2010, 08:17 PM
IS1 is not suitable for aviation photography as I expect most of your shots would be panning. The IS will try and correct this hence the blurred shots. The 70-300 is not the fastest to focus so I wouldn't expect to get all 5 frames in focus.
E-3 70-300 can do good aviation photos Tornado GR4 RAF Waddington air show 2008

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/Tornado_GR4_Banking_copy.jpg

tonton1962
5th July 2010, 07:06 AM
Hi Derek. Yes the IS 1 could be part of the problem and also that I fired off too many shots at once I guess. The irony of it is that i had misread the documentation and changed my IS to 1 (was on 2). Pity I can't do it over again hehe. Thanks for the info.

buddha01
15th February 2012, 08:24 PM
For aviation photography (my main field of photography) I use the 70-300mm, 40-150mm most times. for static and in museums the 14-42mm. Recently I bought also the Samyang/Delamax 650-1300mm f8.0-16 Manual Telephoto lens, because at some airfield and airshows the 70-300mm lacks the range needed and cropping the photo gives to much grain or makes the image to blurry. Sometimes you can't get close enough.;):D
Still training to handhold the 650-1300mm though. So I'm ready when the show sean starts again.;)

buddha01
15th February 2012, 08:31 PM
IS1 is not suitable for aviation photography as I expect most of your shots would be panning. The IS will try and correct this hence the blurred shots. The 70-300 is not the fastest to focus so I wouldn't expect to get all 5 frames in focus.
E-3 70-300 can do good aviation photos Tornado GR4 RAF Waddington air show 2008

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/Tornado_GR4_Banking_copy.jpg

To compensate this minor problem of not focusing that fast on AF, just switch to MF by using the AF-MF switch on the lens.;):p:D
I had the same problem at the 2011 RNLAF open days at Leeuwarden Air Base (EHLW). I switched to MF mode on the lens from time to time to compensate or override the AF of the lens and my problem was solved.:p

buddha01
18th February 2012, 02:33 AM
Hi tonton1962,
Regarding IS. Just switch it off. It's just like DerekC already said. The IS will try to compensate and this results in blurry photos. Better is to train yourself to shoot handhold with the 70-300mm without IS, on A-priority on F8.0-F11, maybe up to F16, depending on the weather. Your Shutter speed will adjust it self to it and will be high enough in most cases. Try to avoid F5.6 or lower, because this can create also camera shake. Better ref up the ISO a step (or two perhaps). See also my article on Olympus User:
http://olympususer.com/community/index.php?f=10&t=633&rb_v=viewtopic

I use as a point & shoot setting in A-priority F6.3 on my 70-300mm. It gives me a fast shutter speed in most cases when outdoors. To capture proppellor blurs you need to set your camera either on M or S-priority. Set your shutter speed somewhere between 1/100 and 1/200 for prop blurring. This is a bit of a tricky thing, because it can ruin the shot of the plane. Ending up in a nice prop blur but with a plane that is complete out of Focus. So, it's better to get the plane sharp and in focus first. Afterwards you can experiment with prop blurring.

Greetz,

Phill D
18th February 2012, 05:29 AM
I must admit I've had difficulties getting plane or bird in flight shots with my 70-300 and E510. The combination seems to be just too slow to react or goes hunting for focus at the wrong time for me. Not sure if it's the lens or the older camera or just me. Probably the latter as others seem to get great shots.

buddha01
18th February 2012, 06:58 PM
Hi Phill,

First see my comment that I've made earlier about focusing here. Second, when a plane or bird is to far away the 70-300mm has also a tendency to go hunting. You can solve that through the solution I have given in my comment earlier. It also helps to put your camera on S-AF+MF. That way you still can focus manually while your lens is on AF. Once you focused on the plane, just half press the shutter and the lens will ( hopefully) lock into place in most cases.;)
Also see my article on Olympus User about Photographing Airplanes:
http://olympususer.com/community/index.php?f=10&t=633&rb_v=viewtopic (http://olympususer.com/community/index.php?f=10&t=633&rb_v=viewtopic)

One thing is for sure, it's not your combo of camera+lens.;) You have an E-510 married to your 70-300mm. I work with an E-420 which is married with my 70-300mm if it comes to photographing airplanes and it works very well.:D:p
It is just a matter of practice, practice, practice.;)*yes
Greetz,