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View Full Version : Does glass quality/size matter?


Radar
18th April 2010, 07:07 AM
Tried to search around to find an answer but turns to this excellent forum for answer :

I have been around taking photos with friends and people I've met that uses either a Nikon DX-camera or a fullformat camera. I have tried to replicate their settings with my camera (Shutter, ISO and f-stop) and can't get the same lightness in the camera. As an example we were taking photos of horses and he used 1/640sec, f8 and ISO400 but his pictures were much lighter than mine that ended up far to the left on the scale.

Someone mentioned that the cameras with larger sensors are able to replicate light better than cameras with smaller sensors. Is this right?

StephenL
18th April 2010, 07:43 AM
Were you both taking Raw images or Jpegs? If Jpegs, the difference is probably in the way each camera configures these. If Raw, make sure that both images are converted using the same parameters. Even this is not guaranteed to prove any point, as the way Raw images from different manufacturers are rendered may be different.

Barrie Norman
18th April 2010, 08:53 AM
Why try to duplicate their settings, I you had set your camera on "A" with f8 and ISO400 the pictures would have come out OK but using full manual is forcing the camera. Olympus cameras with Oly glass will out perform Nikon under normal circumstances the 12.3 mega pixel sensor has more pixels per Sq mm than the full frame Nikon DX so stop trying to duplicate your friends settings and allow the camera some control.

Radar
18th April 2010, 08:58 AM
Photos were taken in RAW and processed in ACR. No changes made to exposure etc. The reason for duplicating the settings were because we started taking about light sensitivity etc. So we had a few exposures to do the test.

However; after the photos were done after the horse photo-session I was booked to to all the photos for a yard (5-6 horses) on 16th of May in a competition. This might be the perfect opportunity to buy/rent a better lens. :)

snaarman
18th April 2010, 10:31 AM
Camera manufacturers come up with ISO settings to match the sensor and metering to customers expectation. Clearly there is no film/developer and negative densitometry involved with digital ISO - so it is a bit of trial and error..

Reviews quite often show that a camera's quoted ISO is wrong, so I guess its a little bit like "how long is a piece of string" In an ideal world every DSLR should produce similar images when set to the same ISO with comparable lenses, but it looks like they don't..

Pete

HughofBardfield
19th April 2010, 01:18 PM
Some of us went on a tutored studio session a while back and found that our results from a given aperture/shutter setting were significantly different to the guy leading the session, who was shooting Nikon (don't remember the model, but I'm certain it wasn't full frame). I seem to remember it was about a stop different. Similar reasons, I guess. As Pete says, there seems no universal standard for digital ISO as there was for film, and I suspect the selection of exactly what constitutes a camera's ISO100 or 200 point (or whatever the "native" sensitivity of the sensor is) is partially a marketing, as well as a technical, decision.

Graham_of_Rainham
19th April 2010, 01:27 PM
Some of us went on a tutored studio session a while back and found that our metered settings were significantly different to the guy leading the session, who was shooting Nikon. Similar reasons, I guess.

I remember that :cool:

Because of this I bought a meter and worked out for myself, much more about the way my E-3 meters with the various modes, etc..

http://www.sekonic.com/classroom/classroom_2.asp

HughofBardfield
19th April 2010, 01:51 PM
I remember that :cool:

Because of this I bought a meter and worked out for myself, much more about the way my E-3 meters with the various modes, etc..

http://www.sekonic.com/classroom/classroom_2.asp

Yes - I've used a flash meter with my own cheap and cheerful studio lights and found that the meter reading is a starting point rather than giving "perfect" exposure (whatever that is). Using legacy lenses also requires a more creative approach as the given reading is often inaccurate (especially in matrix mode - which I now tend not to use with legacy glass).

photo_owl
21st April 2010, 08:09 AM
as Pete and Hugh have outlined, there is no fundamental reason for differences based on lenses or sensor sizes etc

there may be a difference in the actual sensitivity of the sensor in the same way as films have a particular sensitivity; however in my experience this happens less than some discussions suggest.

comparisons are notoriously difficult to make accurately because either the camera jpeg engine is rendering the output (here gradation settings can have a huge impact) or the raw convertor is off applying it's thoughts on the correct output - better but there are still potential issues.