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jonesy
29th March 2010, 09:48 AM
I've been looking into getting ND filters for my camera as I want to explore daytime slow shutter speed work.

I came across this item on ebay
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/NEW-LCW-FILTER-ND-FADER-67mm-67-mm-ND2-to-ND400-NEUTRAL_W0QQitemZ230434777362QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUK _CamerasPhoto_CameraAccessories_CameraLensesFilter s_JN?hash=item35a6fba912#ht_7637wt_1165

anyone heard anything about these? or would it be better for me to get individual ND filters?

Many thanks

theMusicMan
29th March 2010, 10:07 AM
Hi Tracey

I think this is a bit expensive, and would suggest going the Cokin route which means all your filters can be used on all your lenses - as you only need to purchase the filters once, and adapter rings in your lens size.

Surrey Photography I got mine from... a set of 4 filters ND2 & 4 and ND Grad 2 & 4, with adapter rings - total cost around 60 for the lot.

StephenL
29th March 2010, 12:17 PM
Calumet have started stocking these filters - unsure what make - so they must be fairly reputable. They are NOT graduated but of a uniform density, so you still need ND Grads.

I've been looking into getting ND filters for my camera as I want to explore daytime slow shutter speed work.

I came across this item on ebay
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/NEW-LCW-FILTER-ND-FADER-67mm-67-mm-ND2-to-ND400-NEUTRAL_W0QQitemZ230434777362QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUK _CamerasPhoto_CameraAccessories_CameraLensesFilter s_JN?hash=item35a6fba912#ht_7637wt_1165

anyone heard anything about these? or would it be better for me to get individual ND filters?

Many thanks

benvendetta
29th March 2010, 12:40 PM
Likewise Premier Inks for these fader NDs www.premier-ink.co.uk. I have found this place pretty good (they were at Focus) and I have a Kood ND8 in 72mm . These are 25 and 77mm ones are 30. Get yourself one to fit your largest lens and a couple of stepping rings and you are sorted. Mind you, you may want more the the three stops an ND8 will give you but this is enough for me at the mo.

jonesy
29th March 2010, 01:47 PM
Thanks everyone.
So am I correct in thinking that I need ND filters and ND Grads?

E-3
29th March 2010, 01:59 PM
Thanks everyone.
So am I correct in thinking that I need ND filters and ND Grads?

Tracey, what size lenses do you need them for ? as I have a set that I would consider selling, I think they are 67mm, ( I will have to check) if you are interested let me know :)

theMusicMan
29th March 2010, 02:01 PM
Well tracey, depends what you want to take shots of.

ND's - putting what they do simply, just reduce the amount of light hitting the sensor for a given aperture i.e. they will allow you to take longer exposures for the same aperture. An ND2 will give 1 stop additional exposure, and ND4 will give 2 stops additional exposure, and an ND8 will give 3 stops of additional exposure. So, if you want those dreamy long exposure shots of moving water, or dreamy clouds, or seascapes... they are the ones to use (well... apart from an ND110 which is a full 10 stopper whopper!!)

ND Grads give the same level of additional exposure, but the filter is graduated - either harshly (it ends at a point) or softly (it ends over a more gradual point). These can be used for landscape shots to compensate for things such as sky v's foregound. Where you have the sky brighter than the landscape, if you used an ND Grad, with the darker part of the grad over the sky, and you had exposed for the land, then for the same aperture, less light will hit the sensor from the sky and the same amount of light will hit the sensor for the land (as long as you've positioned the filter and composed well) and you will have both the sky and land correctly exposed.

How's that for a quick explanation...?

Wreckdiver
29th March 2010, 02:03 PM
Thanks everyone.
So am I correct in thinking that I need ND filters and ND Grads?

Hi Tracey, ND filters are coated over the whole surface so that they cut down the light equally over the whole exposure. Typically, you would have a 1 stop and a 2 stop filter and by combining you get 1, 2 or 3 stops. You would use these to give an extended shutter duration for, say, photgraphing moving water to give a milky effect.

ND grads have a dark part at the top and clear at the bottom and you would use these to darken skies where there is a large difference in exposure between the sky and ground. They too come in different values and you can combine them to get the exposure balance required.

ND grads are usually rectangular and fit in a holder mounted on the lens screw thread at the front (Cokin). You only need the one system for multiple lens diameters, just get separate adapter rings for each lens size.

Hope that helps,

Steve

Wreckdiver
29th March 2010, 02:04 PM
Our postings arrived together John :)

Steve

theMusicMan
29th March 2010, 02:19 PM
Yours was more elegant a response than mine, Steve :)

Wreckdiver
29th March 2010, 02:39 PM
Yours was more elegant a response than mine, Steve :)

:) *chr

Steve

jonesy
29th March 2010, 03:29 PM
Thanks for all the great advice. Much appreciated.

So if I go down the Cokin route, I presume I need a kit like this http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cokin-H250A-ND-Grad-Kit/dp/B000A40M22/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1269876335&sr=1-1

and an adapter for each size lens I want to use them on... and then I just buy the individual filters I want after that?

theMusicMan
29th March 2010, 03:33 PM
Hi Tracey

Or this... http://www.surreyphotographyshop.co.uk/product_info.php?cPath=59&products_id=1302

... and some adapter rings for each of your lenses... you get the holder with this set.

HughofBardfield
30th March 2010, 02:02 PM
Cokin (and I think possibly Kood) NDs can return a noticeable magenta colour cast in some circumstances. Personally, I've only seen it on the E1, but it has been widely reported... It's obviously easier to remove this with a full ND than a grad - it can be done, but more fiddly.

After finding the colour cast on some images, I invested in a set of Hi-Tech ND grads on Zuiko's recommendation. I find them very good.

See http://www.teamworkphoto.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=767_277

The holders (Cokin P or 85mm) are pretty much interchangable. Unless you buy a set (with holder and filters) I'd get whatever is cheapest. With very wide lenses (like the ZD 11-22mm) the standard filter holders can cause vignetting at the wide end - but this can also be a problem if you use more than one screw-in filter.