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Ellie
9th February 2008, 01:36 AM
... with 70 - 300mm lens on E-400

Quite impressed with the lens, although itís a bit unwieldy on the E-400, the camera feels weightless at the end of the lens. I used the tripod, which is also something quite new to using.

First there was the Buzzard, of course it was too far away, but I still tried to get a picture. It's still a blurry little dot, but I know it was a buzzard.

This is an Egret, Iím sooo pleased with it, itís the best one Iíve ever taken of one of these birds because Iíve never been able to get close enough before.

(Sorry about the size, I can't seem to find the link for thumbnails, and I can't right click on anything in my gallery)


Egret
100% crop, but resized for uploading

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/506/medium/70_300d.jpg


Greenshank
This one on the left is a top to bottom strip of the picture, at 25% full size. The bird was really only properly visible through binoculars, so I'm delighted with this.
On the right is 100% crop, full size, of the same picture. The bird watchers were busy noting the rings, apparently this individual Greenshank can be identified by them.

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/506/medium/70_300c1.jpg http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/506/medium/70_300c2.jpg

?Are these Eider?

I couldn't see them very clearly because they were too far away. If nothing else the picture can be used for identification.

100% crop, not resized

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/506/medium/70_300_a.jpg

And this picture I think might be special.

These two little birds were hopping and flying around in the grass, they're about the size of a sparrow and were clearly a pair.

Does anybody know what they are?

100% crop, not resized.

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/506/medium/70_300b.jpg

I'm delighted with these pictures, and the others I took today, very pleased I plucked up the courage to get the second hand lens from USA, it was a bargain even though Royal Mail spoiled things a bit.

With a bit of practice I think I might be able to get sharper pictures of birds, those I took of things that were stationary were remarkably crisp.

theMusicMan
9th February 2008, 06:34 AM
Hi there Ellie

Great shots, you gotta love the 70-300mm eh - I know I do. You've got some good captures there for your bird collection, especially that last one. They are Reed Buntings; male in top left, female in bottom right. You might have caught them in their mating ritual as the breeding season is fast approaching and has started in some areas.

Melaka
9th February 2008, 08:08 AM
... with 70 - 300mm lens on E-400


?Are these Eider?

I couldn't see them very clearly because they were too far away. If nothing else the picture can be used for identification.

100% crop, not resized

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/506/medium/70_300_a.jpg




They're not Eider, which is a duck, but Brent geese. Brent are common on and near the coast between the Humber and the Exe. They're easiest to photograph if you get them inland on grass rather than against the grey background of coastal mud. They flight in great flocks which can also make good photos.

Ellie
10th February 2008, 12:12 AM
Ah, Reed Buntings. I've never seen them before. It's a wetland/salt marsh area so I expect they're more common than I imagined. Is the female the brown one?

Brent geese? :o They look completely different out of the water, there were dozens of them in the sea so I should have realised what they were.

theMusicMan
10th February 2008, 08:44 AM
Ah, Reed Buntings. I've never seen them before. It's a wetland/salt marsh area so I expect they're more common than I imagined. Is the female the brown one?
Yep Ellie... male in top left, female in bottom right.

David M
10th February 2008, 12:07 PM
The last photo looks like a pair of Stonechat to me.

theMusicMan
10th February 2008, 12:28 PM
You know, I think David may well be right here... great spot there David, thanks for the correction sir.

Ellie
11th February 2008, 01:14 PM
The last photo looks like a pair of Stonechat to me.
I've never knowlingly seen/identified either Stonechats or Reed Buntings, so I'll take your word for it.

I've looked at Colin Bates' site here (http://www.communigate.co.uk/hants/itchenbirds/page1.phtml)and here (http://www.communigate.co.uk/hants/itchenbirds/page5.phtml)(scroll down) and am surprised by how similar the two species are.