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gno
6th February 2010, 01:24 PM
Hi All,

The rule-of-thumb which holds that, to avoid excessive camera shake, the shutter speed should be no less than the reciprocal of the lens. How does this equate to 4/3rds cameras without image stabilisation when using zoom lenses over 200mm.
ie 200mm = 1/200 sec

Regards

Gavin

Wreckdiver
6th February 2010, 01:35 PM
The way I understand it is that the reciprocal rule relates to the 35mm system. So for a 4/3rds lens at 200mm this would be a shutter duration of 1/400 sec. or shorter.

Steve

StephenL
6th February 2010, 01:38 PM
That's also my understanding of the "rule". *yes

The way I understand it is that the reciprocal rule relates to the 35mm system. So for a 4/3rds lens at 200mm this would be a shutter duration of 1/400 sec. or shorter.

Steve

snaarman
6th February 2010, 02:02 PM
The way I understand it is that the reciprocal rule relates to the 35mm system. So for a 4/3rds lens at 200mm this would be a shutter duration of 1/400 sec. or shorter.

Steve

Yep. That's my rule as well.

Equally - I ignore it a lot

Pete

gno
6th February 2010, 06:30 PM
Thanks All for your replies,

So rule of thumb for 4/3rds without IS would be double the focal length as a fraction of a second.

ie 300mm would equate to 1/600 sec.
Does aperture play any part in this calculation to necessitate an increase or decrease in shutter speed?

Regards

Gavin

Wreckdiver
6th February 2010, 06:53 PM
Does aperture play any part in this calculation to necessitate an increase or decrease in shutter speed?


The aperture doesn't play a part per se in the calculation. It is affected by the fact that you have specified a shutter duration and hence the aperture (and possibly ISO) may have to change to achieve correct exposure.

Steve

photonutter
6th February 2010, 09:30 PM
Didn't think the sensor crop factor figured into this, nearly always shoot in manual mode and 1/200th for a 200mm lens isn't a problem, so long as the 200mm is the marking on the lens.

photo_owl
6th February 2010, 10:53 PM
it does - and used to in film days as well with a 100mm lens on a half frame camera or a MF (ignoring the body size!) operating with different comfort (!) shutter speeds.

theMusicMan
7th February 2010, 10:04 AM
OK, there are 'rules of thumb', but in the case of the E-3 (and other e-system models with in-camera IS) this is one 'rule of thumb' that can be consigned to the extremities of the bin.

How far you can push the camera is dependent on a lot of things; stance, 'awkwardness' of shot you're trying to capture, not to mention the lighting conditions. I have managed a few at ridiculous shutter speeds. There's several in this gallery where I am just stood as still as possible, holding my breath, and attempting the shot - with shutter speeds around 1/2 second. There's even one where I lean up against a post, elbows rigid into my sides, deep breath and hey presto, 1.2 second exposure that works. OK this may be lucky, and somewhat of a fluke, but the proof is there. These were all handheld, no tripod, no camera resting on anything but my hands.

http://www.reflectingme.com/p16373383

This is the 1.2 s exposure shot;
http://www.reflectingme.com/img/v3/p380657780-3.jpg (http://www.reflectingme.com/p16373383/e16b06074)

StephenL
7th February 2010, 10:18 AM
Great shot well taken, but the OP was asking about cameras without IS. :)

gno
7th February 2010, 10:58 AM
it does - and used to in film days as well with a 100mm lens on a half frame camera or a MF (ignoring the body size!) operating with different comfort (!) shutter speeds.

photo_owl

The plot thickens!

Given that everyone is different and some may be able to take unfuzzy shots at very low shutter speeds, there must be some method to get a base line from; given that there are now at least two variables when there is no image stabilisation.

Regards

Gavin

Kiwi Paul
7th February 2010, 11:12 AM
I guess the best way is just to get out there with a camera and lens and shoot various subjects at various focal lengths and determine your own threshold.

Paul

theMusicMan
7th February 2010, 11:33 AM
Great shot well taken, but the OP was asking about cameras without IS. :)
Oops... that will teach me to read the OP's thread correctly. Apologies...:o