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ardvorlich
21st October 2009, 05:03 PM
O.K. so having upgaded to e-620 and playing with different settings I've read that in some circumstances (i.e. low light) it is preferable to use the diamond set up for AF.What is this please and how do you set this.Sorry if I'm being silly.
Cheers Iain

peak4
21st October 2009, 05:29 PM
A timely query; I spent a while last weekend, without the manual, trying to set mine to Diamond pattern, just like I sometimes use on the E-3.
Having failed completely and decided I must be a right numpty, your post prompted me to get the manual out.
The reason I couldn't do it, and you can't find any reference to it seems to be that it's not an option with the E-620:(
Ho Hum

StephenL
21st October 2009, 05:41 PM
I think that what you are referring to as the diamond pattern is simply "all points"; in other words, the other option to single point.

Zuiko
21st October 2009, 05:41 PM
O.K. so having upgaded to e-620 and playing with different settings I've read that in some circumstances (i.e. low light) it is preferable to use the diamond set up for AF.What is this please and how do you set this.Sorry if I'm being silly.
Cheers Iain

Hi Iain,

It's a pattern of active focus sensors. You can select either sigle point, multi-point (using all sensors) or diamond pattern.

Single point obviously gives you the best control but is not always easy to get right with moving subjects or to achieve a positive focus in dim light. Multi-point gives the best chance of the focus system locking onto something, but you've no control ovr which focus point will be activated.

Diamond pattern is essentially a single point, but with the surrounding four points enabled to act as "helpers." The single point will always take precedence when it is able to achieve focus, but when it isn't able then any of the surrounding four will try. I've also heard that the four "helper" points actually guide the main point to help it achieve focus in difficult situations.

You select it as part of the same sequence of switching between single and multi-points.

Hope this helps, let me know if you need further explaination. :)

ardvorlich
21st October 2009, 05:58 PM
Thanks all.John thanks for the concise explanation.As stated previously I don't think this is an option on 620 as I can't find any mention in manual either.Oh well at least it's something else NOT to have to learn.
Cheers Iain

Zuiko
21st October 2009, 06:23 PM
Thanks all.John thanks for the concise explanation.As stated previously I don't think this is an option on 620 as I can't find any mention in manual either.Oh well at least it's something else NOT to have to learn.
Cheers Iain

Ah, from your question I assumed it was an option on the 620 and that it would work as on the E3. It's useful, but it's not a major feature to get too excited about. :)

ardvorlich
21st October 2009, 06:32 PM
Hi John I read about this on another forum but rereading it I think the poster there was confused between E30 & E620 hence my reason for asking the question.
regards Iain

photo_owl
21st October 2009, 09:39 PM
not quite (and ignoring the validity to the 620 for the time being)

in diamond the AF is weighted towards finding a focus subject at the selected point but all points are valid solutions to the program - not just the 'next 4'.

this is easy to check/prove - put the camera in diamond (single target dynamic to give it it's mode) and find a plain wall with a clock or similar. in S-AF move the camera until an outer point can see the clock and watch it become the AF point.

basically if there is anything the selected AF point can see it will become the first option on your AF cycle ie that's what you will get when you push the shutter. if you chimp it will cycle to alternatives, or you can choose to cycle via your particular set up.

it works extremely well when compared to s-t (s) or (n) for subjects that have poor contrast in my experience. it is my default setting even when shooting sports etc and missed focus is unusual.

Zuiko
21st October 2009, 10:27 PM
not quite (and ignoring the validity to the 620 for the time being)

in diamond the AF is weighted towards finding a focus subject at the selected point but all points are valid solutions to the program - not just the 'next 4'.

this is easy to check/prove - put the camera in diamond (single target dynamic to give it it's mode) and find a plain wall with a clock or similar. in S-AF move the camera until an outer point can see the clock and watch it become the AF point.

basically if there is anything the selected AF point can see it will become the first option on your AF cycle ie that's what you will get when you push the shutter. if you chimp it will cycle to alternatives, or you can choose to cycle via your particular set up.

it works extremely well when compared to s-t (s) or (n) for subjects that have poor contrast in my experience. it is my default setting even when shooting sports etc and missed focus is unusual.

Must admit I didn't know it utilized all focus points. Does it give priority to any points other than the centre point?

Despite owning the E3 for over a year I'm still learning more about what it actually does every day! I sometimes think that people who experience disappointment with it and write it off as inferior to other brands just haven't fully explored all the possibilities and discovered the best configeration for their needs of this remarkable camera.

photo_owl
22nd October 2009, 08:23 PM
Must admit I didn't know it utilized all focus points. Does it give priority to any points other than the centre point?

Despite owning the E3 for over a year I'm still learning more about what it actually does every day! I sometimes think that people who experience disappointment with it and write it off as inferior to other brands just haven't fully explored all the possibilities and discovered the best configeration for their needs of this remarkable camera.

yep to the wider point (and then response lengthened to 10 charecters...)

nope to any other priority - it will give you what you are aiming for if it can as the first option.