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View Full Version : Something to mull over about IS.


andym
3rd September 2009, 01:54 PM
Sorry if this has the mentioned before.

I shoot generaly with IS off(thats just me)and only turn it on when I feel its needed.
Now if its been on and I turn the camera off the sensor re-positions ie the the shudder.
If I've used IS during shooting but turned it off(IS that is)the sensor does not re-position at power down.
Do you think its worth turning IS on before turning the camera off.
My normal starting setting is with IS off.

This is probably a load of drivel.

Its a bit like cricket ie when your in your out and when your out your in.

Just interested

Ps even if I dont let the sensor re-position it seems to make no difference to my pictures so whats it doing?

EH1
3rd September 2009, 01:59 PM
I keep my IS on all the time!..................it saves all these dilemas that you are having! :D

StephenL
3rd September 2009, 02:13 PM
I would imagine that when you turn IS off while the camera is on, then the sensor repositions (whatever that means) at that time.

I'm an "always on" bloke, but recently I've been wondering if I should only use it when I need it and have it switched off when I'm using high shutter speeds. On another forum there are quite a few threads suggesting (without, as far as I can see, actual hard evidence) that if it's left on during high shutter speeds it can actually soften an image.

EH1
3rd September 2009, 02:33 PM
if it's left on during high shutter speeds it can actually soften an image.

This is very interesting! Im off to experiment now!:confused:

StephenL
3rd September 2009, 03:01 PM
Unfortunately since I discovered this nugget of information we've had nothing but rain - certainly not enough light to permit high shutter speeds to experiment with! :mad:

oly_om
3rd September 2009, 03:11 PM
IS will soften the image if used on a tripod - in practice, not very much though, and hardly noticeable. If you are using IS hand-held with high shutter speeds, it may well be to take moving objects - in which case, the IS can be bothersome as it can negate any panning motion to track the moving object. If I was hand-holding and using the camera in a fixed position, I would always use IS, irrespective of shutter speed.

Andy

StephenL
3rd September 2009, 03:20 PM
So do I, but since reading that thread it's started me wondering....

I note that the Oly manual makes no mention of this, only to switch it off for tripod use. I usually forget to do that, with no noticable ill effects.

If I was hand-holding and using the camera in a fixed position, I would always use IS, irrespective of shutter speed.

Andy

Graham_of_Rainham
3rd September 2009, 03:33 PM
I did a moon shot and it was whirring away for 15s which was a complete waste of time as the camera was resting on a rock solid platform. I keep it switched off and turn it on as required.

Unless I forget and leave it on :o

Looking forward to the consensus of oppinion on this one. Perhaps a poll is needed:eek:

Adagio
3rd September 2009, 03:42 PM
Looking forward to the consensus of oppinion on this one. Perhaps a poll is needed:eek:

A consensus? Small chance:D

andym
3rd September 2009, 03:43 PM
I leave it turned off if the light is OK as I got good result over the years with the E1.Also its another moving part that could be a failure point plus its also drsaining your battery.

jonesy
3rd September 2009, 03:53 PM
I wish I had IS :(

After seeing some of the longer hand held shots I think its time for me to start saving my money for a camera that does have it.. then I can also be in a dilemma as to whether to have it on or off ;)

theMusicMan
3rd September 2009, 04:03 PM
I wish I had IS :(

After seeing some of the longer hand held shots I think its time for me to start saving my money for a camera that does have it.. then I can also be in a dilemma as to whether to have it on or off ;)
You'll wonder how you ever managed without it Tracey :) I have some handheld shots in my gallery that were taken with 1s exposure.

jonesy
3rd September 2009, 04:40 PM
You'll wonder how you ever managed without it Tracey :) I have some handheld shots in my gallery that were taken with 1s exposure.
You're not making this any easier... ;) I feel I need to either win big on the lottery, or save lots of money :D

Nick Temple-Fry
3rd September 2009, 04:54 PM
You're not making this any easier... ;) I feel I need to either win big on the lottery, or save lots of money :D

Make a positive of the wait - the steadier you can hold the camera the more advantage you will get with IS - so really you are not delaying but preparing yourself to get the best out of IS.

That makes you feel better - doesn't it;)

Nick

oly_om
3rd September 2009, 05:07 PM
I think poles only result in quantifying opinion, rather than fact.. if you know what I mean!

Certainly for me, I can't hand-hold well enough not to have IS (medication related tremor). I would really doubt at high shutter speeds if there is anything in it at all, except when panning. I can't think of a great experiment to actually quantify it either way, which is another problem.

Andy

oly_om
3rd September 2009, 05:09 PM
I leave it turned off if the light is OK as I got good result over the years with the E1.Also its another moving part that could be a failure point plus its also drsaining your battery.

The E-1 does a great job of draining its battery without IS - I think the E-3 will still out-last it with IS turned on! I always use the vertical grip with the E-1 as the standard BLM-1 runtime is not so hot.

Andy

Zuiko
3rd September 2009, 07:04 PM
The position is clear-cut for me. IS ALWAYS on, except when using a tripod. But then, I've got Parkinson's. To me, IS is THE most important innovation of the digital age! *yes

andym
3rd September 2009, 07:09 PM
The E-1 does a great job of draining its battery without IS - I think the E-3 will still out-last it with IS turned on! I always use the vertical grip with the E-1 as the standard BLM-1 runtime is not so hot.

Andy


Now thats funny.I find both the E1 and E3 about the same with the IS turned off on a single BLM1,about 250 shots.
I've not done any testing but this seems to be lower on the E3 with IS turned on.
I normaly use the grip on both cameras but find the E1 way outlasts the E3 with the dedicated battery.

Kiwi Paul
3rd September 2009, 08:32 PM
I think it depends on what you are shooting, if it's birds or wildlife I have found you need to use a high shutter speed to avoid motion blur (the subject moving or flapping it's wings etc) and as such the shutter speed is already high enough to avoid any blur caused by camera movement but if it's static things you are shooting then since motion blur is no longer an issue you can use much lower shutter speeds and under those conditions IS is useful.

Paul

photo_owl
3rd September 2009, 08:46 PM
I think it depends on what you are shooting, if it's birds or wildlife I have found you need to use a high shutter speed to avoid motion blur (the subject moving or flapping it's wings etc) and as such the shutter speed is already high enough to avoid any blur caused by camera movement but if it's static things you are shooting then since motion blur is no longer an issue you can use much lower shutter speeds and under those conditions IS is useful.

Paul

there's a sort of yes and no in there somewhere Paul - but I agree with the underlying principle!

the problem is that it doesn't take much of a 43 lens for 'fast shutter speed' and the underlying principle of hand held minimum shutter speeds to cross over! at such speed the motion elements of many subjects are reasonably well covered (not hummingbirds or blue tits maybe :) )

example

70-300 at 300 has a minimum shutter speed of 1/600th (non IS old school) and therefore more like a 1/1250th for any degree of comfort. Now 1/1250th would for many be a fast shutter speed but persobally I would expect IS to work with me in this range, not against. Add an EC20 to the 300/2.8 and, excepting the 3 and 30, you don't really have a shutter speed that's totally safe - but they are certainly fast.

add shooting from a small boat in a choppy sea and what do you get then?

as has been mentioned earlier in the threa, it's easly to illustrate the negative effect that can occur when using IS on a reasonably long exposure with an absolutely solid tripod set up (MLU, remote triggering etc) but I have been unable to illustrate any negative impact on any hand held shot with 'fast shutter speed syndrome' whatever that might be. There is also no real logic to why it might occur either.

At the end of the day it's up to individuals to satisfy themselves (IMO) and it's easy to do.

All the above excludes panning etc

Kiwi Paul
3rd September 2009, 09:07 PM
I see your point, I was only looking at shooting things from solid ground handheld and no panning, of course any 3rd party movement (a boat rocking etc) needs to be considered and IS is useful then. I always leave IS on and only turn it off as required.

BUt I agree that fast shutter speeds and IS should not adversely affect one another.

Paul

oly_om
3rd September 2009, 09:56 PM
Now thats funny.I find both the E1 and E3 about the same with the IS turned off on a single BLM1,about 250 shots.
I've not done any testing but this seems to be lower on the E3 with IS turned on.
I normaly use the grip on both cameras but find the E1 way outlasts the E3 with the dedicated battery.

I'm comparing running the bll-1 (grip battery) with 2 blm-1 batteries (in the E-3 grip). I tend to leave the camera turned on, just in case something happens, with the shutdown time set quite long (5 minutes). I could also be that my E-1 grip battery is knack'd!

Andy

michaelavis
7th September 2009, 07:25 AM
IS will soften the image if used on a tripod - in practice, not very much though, and hardly noticeable. If you are using IS hand-held with high shutter speeds, it may well be to take moving objects - in which case, the IS can be bothersome as it can negate any panning motion to track the moving object. If I was hand-holding and using the camera in a fixed position, I would always use IS, irrespective of shutter speed.

Andy

Aren't the IS2 and IS3 (on bodies that have it) modes intended to cope with panning? i.e. you get the benefits of IS for the target object, without it trying to stabilize the moving background. I would have though these modes along with the "normal" IS1 mode suggest that IS is designed as an "always-on" function other than when using a tripod.

Seems to me there are no noticeable downsides to leaving it on, but a big downside if an opportunistic, low-light opportunity gets away because it was switched off!!