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froeng
19th January 2008, 09:42 PM
Hello,

I am using Lightroom to process and organise all my images. I found the sharpening tools introduced in version 1.1 very usefull to deal with my E-1 photos.
First I always used the standard parameters which are "Amount 25; Radius 1; Detail 25; Masking 0. However, after some tweaking I found another setting that seemed to produce better (sharper) results in general and that I have now saved as a preset for all my E-1 files:
Amount 40; Radius 0,6; Detail 100; Masking 0.
I usually go from there now and would adjust the Detail and Masking sliders depending on the noise present in the image...

Does anybody have an opinion on this? What are your settings/experiences? I would suspect that you would need completely different settings for different camera resolutions???

Best Regards


Frank

PeterD
19th January 2008, 10:03 PM
Hello,

I am using Lightroom to process and organise all my images. I found the sharpening tools introduced in version 1.1 very usefull to deal with my E-1 photos.
First I always used the standard parameters which are "Amount 25; Radius 1; Detail 25; Masking 0. However, after some tweaking I found another setting that seemed to produce better (sharper) results in general and that I have now saved as a preset for all my E-1 files:
Amount 40; Radius 0,6; Detail 100; Masking 0.
I usually go from there now and would adjust the Detail and Masking sliders depending on the noise present in the image...

Does anybody have an opinion on this? What are your settings/experiences? I would suspect that you would need completely different settings for different camera resolutions???

Best Regards


Frank

Frank,

I have just purchased Lightroom and I am exploring it. What I understand, so far, is that your approach is the correct one. That is, setting a default that suits your camera and style. The details on sharpening I shall leave to others as I own an E3 and I suspect I would use different settings.

My first task is to understand what each tool does before I attempt to create settings I would start from as a norm. Still a long way from that yet:(

By the way, Lightroom is at version 1.3 now. Oops misread your post and assumed you were still using Version 1.1 Sorry

Kind regards

PeterD

froeng
19th January 2008, 10:10 PM
Peter,

Lightroom is an awesome program! Enjoy! BTW the current version is 1.31! I think they even changed some bits that would be important for your E-3!

Best Regards

Frank

PeterD
19th January 2008, 10:13 PM
Peter,

Lightroom is an awesome program! Enjoy! BTW the current version is 1.31! I think they even changed some bits that would be important for your E-3!

Best Regards

Frank

I have heard reports on this forum about 1.3.1 but when I use the update module it tells me I am up to date with 1.3.0:(

Kind regards

PeterD

froeng
19th January 2008, 10:16 PM
You can download the update from here:

http://www.adobe.com/downloads/updates/?ogn=EN_US-gntray_dl_updates

Regards

Frank

PeterD
19th January 2008, 10:28 PM
You can download the update from here:

http://www.adobe.com/downloads/updates/?ogn=EN_US-gntray_dl_updates

Regards

Frank

Frank

Just downloaded 1.3.1 but it still shows version 1.3. Guess I already had 1.3.1:confused:

Not to worry, thanks for the link.

Kind regards

PeterD

froeng
19th January 2008, 10:42 PM
Peter,

in Lightroom, when you go to "Help"-"About...", you should be getting a version like this (I hope this link works):

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/2074/size/big/cat//ppuser/362.jpg


Regards


Frank

Glyn R
19th January 2008, 11:04 PM
My Lightroom shows in Help About 1.3.1.
I use up to 100 with 1.2 pixels. Mostly I sharpen in PSE6 Unsharp Mask.

theMusicMan
19th January 2008, 11:20 PM
I tend to set zero sharpening as my default parameter in Lightroom, and only adjust this setting according to the image I am processing. I have also found that using USM in Photoshop yields better results than using the sharpening settings within Lightroom.

For some images, I even think that using sharpening in Lightroom seems to exaggerate the effect over the top somewhat.

I am sure this is down to my inexperience with using Lightroom, but I tend to use this better for adjusting certain parameters, and Photoshop for others.

Glyn R
20th January 2008, 01:28 PM
I agree I do most of my sharpening in PSE6 with USM. I use Lightroom when there is only slight general sharpening to do or to preview how much sharpening is needed. I would have thought that the Sharpen in Lightroom was the same as USM but it seems not.

theMusicMan
20th January 2008, 01:41 PM
I agree I do most of my sharpening in PSE6 with USM. I use Lightroom when there is only slight general sharpening to do or to preview how much sharpening is needed. I would have thought that the Sharpen in Lightroom was the same as USM but it seems not.I totally agree Glyn, there is a marked difference in the resulting output when sharpening is applied to an image in Lightroom, compared to using any of the sharpening tools available within Photoshop.

I'd say the sharpening tools in Photoshop are far better personally.

One good thing about LightRoom sharpening though is the mask parameter - this really does have an excellent effect on skin tone and ensures that levels of contrast are raised only on existing areas of contrasting colours and not to similar colours. Try it on a close up portrait you may have on file... make sure you zoom into the face/eye - and then increase the sharpening firstly without increasing the masking, then increas the masking and see how soft the skin tone remains but the eye or other contrasting areas get sharpened.

/side note
Excellent discussion this folks... e-group is really an excellent forum and resource for us togs. Thanks all for making it such a super place.

PeterD
20th January 2008, 08:08 PM
Peter,

in Lightroom, when you go to "Help"-"About...", you should be getting a version like this (I hope this link works):

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/2074/size/big/cat//ppuser/362.jpg


Regards


Frank

Frank

Thanks I do have the same as you. What threw me was in lightroom itself states version 1.3 without the additional .1:o

Best regards

PeterD

PeterD
20th January 2008, 08:13 PM
I totally agree Glyn, there is a marked difference in the resulting output when sharpening is applied to an image in Lightroom, compared to using any of the sharpening tools available within Photoshop.

I'd say the sharpening tools in Photoshop are far better personally.

One good thing about LightRoom sharpening though is the mask parameter - this really does have an excellent effect on skin tone and ensures that levels of contrast are raised only on existing areas of contrasting colours and not to similar colours. Try it on a close up portrait you may have on file... make sure you zoom into the face/eye - and then increase the sharpening firstly without increasing the masking, then increas the masking and see how soft the skin tone remains but the eye or other contrasting areas get sharpened.

/side note
Excellent discussion this folks... e-group is really an excellent forum and resource for us togs. Thanks all for making it such a super place.

Reading from Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Book by Scott Kelby he says that sharpening is best achieved in Photoshop. My problem is that I have an early edition of Photoshop and Lightroom does not seem to recognise it:(

Regards
PeterD

froeng
20th January 2008, 09:31 PM
Peter,

it depends what you are doing. Generally sharpening in LR is referred to as "import sharpening". That means it will bring out the detail that exists in the image. This is not intented to be used as "output sharpening" for printing. As I understand it, the LR output sharpening is not there yet (only very rudimental in the Print module), but it will be incorporated in one of the upcoming upgrades...

For more info on LR check the "Luminous Landscape" and Michael Reichmann's excellent video tutorials. They are better then any book you can buy, I believe (and they are cheap, too; thanks to the exchange rate).

Best Regards

Frank

PeterD
20th January 2008, 10:46 PM
Peter,

it depends what you are doing. Generally sharpening in LR is referred to as "import sharpening". That means it will bring out the detail that exists in the image. This is not intented to be used as "output sharpening" for printing. As I understand it, the LR output sharpening is not there yet (only very rudimental in the Print module), but it will be incorporated in one of the upcoming upgrades...

For more info on LR check the "Luminous Landscape" and Michael Reichmann's excellent video tutorials. They are better then any book you can buy, I believe (and they are cheap, too; thanks to the exchange rate).

Best Regards

Frank

Frank

Thanks for your reply.

The book I quoted was recommended and thats why I bought it to try and accelerate my learning curve. I wish I hadn't bothered and saved the money. The book attempts humour which leaves me feeling patronised. It seems to want to show off how much the author knows by using many different options of doing the same thing using keyboard shortcuts etc. Whatever happened to clear flowing text that takes you on a journey of discovery with an appendix to give you alternative methods when you have some knowledge.
In short, I would NEVER recommend this book.

Getting back to the subject, I hope they do upgrade the sharpening options in Lightroom. I prefer to work in one package instead of swopping to another expensive package to carry out editing.

Best Regards

PeterD