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davidsa
8th August 2009, 09:42 AM
Does anyone here have experience of Linux image manipulation software other than GIMP?

David

gno
8th August 2009, 12:18 PM
Does anyone here have experience of Linux image manipulation software other than GIMP?


Hi David,

What features are you looking for that are not covered in Gimp.
You may find something of interest in this (http://www.linfo.org/software_artists.html)

Regards

Gavin

davidsa
8th August 2009, 02:31 PM
Hi Gavin

Just curious to know what is out there. I run a Linux (SUSE) on a second computer for my own elucidation, because is generally more stable than Windows, and because the day could well come when I won't be able to afford the offerings of Microsoft et al!

Also I haven't been able to get the Gimp RAW-processing softway UFRAW to work properly under Windows (havent't tried it the Linux version yet) and was wondering what else there is, specifically under Linux.

David

mas
8th August 2009, 03:19 PM
You could look at Krita.

I've seen itrecommended because it has adjustment layers, which is a feature that gimp lacks.

(and I have no problem using oly raws in gimp under windows xp or ubuntu linux)

fitheach
8th August 2009, 07:10 PM
Also I haven't been able to get the Gimp RAW-processing softway UFRAW to work properly under Windows (havent't tried it the Linux version yet) and was wondering what else there is, specifically under Linux.
David

UFRaw is both a stand-alone program and a plugin for GIMP (at least on Linux distros). You could still use GIMP in combination with another raw processor. There are some other applications using dcraw, see Dave Coffin's page (creator of dcraw) http://cybercom.net/~dcoffin/dcraw/.

If you don't want to use GIMP there is also CinePaint (http://www.cinepaint.org/) (which was originally based on GIMP but has now gone its own way). CinePaint is extensively used by Hollywood film studios and has been designed to support higher bit depths (up to 32 bit per channel). Krita also supports 16 bit per channel.

However, I would encourage you to try GIMP and UFRaw on GNU/Linux. I have been using that combination for many years and it works really well. In recent times colour management, on GNU/Linux, has come on leaps and bounds which helps enormously.

With regard to running UFRaw on MS Windows - did you install GIMP first?

davidsa
1st September 2009, 07:36 PM
Thanks for the comments and apologies for not responding before.

Yes, Gimp (for Windows) was already installed when I installed UFRAW.

In fact Oly's own software (Master 2) seems to be working for me tolerably well, and I haven't been playing with software much recently. It would be nice to have something integrated into Gimp, though.

I had a look at Cinepaint but couldn't seem to install it onto SUSE - there is new version of this out shortly so I'll try Cinepaint again.

David


UFRaw is both a stand-alone program and a plugin for GIMP (at least on Linux distros). You could still use GIMP in combination with another raw processor. There are some other applications using dcraw, see Dave Coffin's page (creator of dcraw) http://cybercom.net/~dcoffin/dcraw/.

If you don't want to use GIMP there is also CinePaint (http://www.cinepaint.org/) (which was originally based on GIMP but has now gone its own way). CinePaint is extensively used by Hollywood film studios and has been designed to support higher bit depths (up to 32 bit per channel). Krita also supports 16 bit per channel.

However, I would encourage you to try GIMP and UFRaw on GNU/Linux. I have been using that combination for many years and it works really well. In recent times colour management, on GNU/Linux, has come on leaps and bounds which helps enormously.

With regard to running UFRaw on MS Windows - did you install GIMP first?

fitheach
2nd September 2009, 12:03 PM
Yes, Gimp (for Windows) was already installed when I installed UFRAW.


Make sure that you don't have two versions of GIMP installed. UFRaw might be associated with the "other" GIMP. Have a look in your programs directory for more than one GIMP exe file.



I had a look at Cinepaint but couldn't seem to install it onto SUSE - there is new version of this out shortly so I'll try Cinepaint again.


Unless you have a need for 16bit+ images it may be best to stick with GIMP. I have never been a SüSE user but I would have thought installing anything would have been easy via YaST.

Why not try GIMP + UFRaw on SüSE and see if you like it?