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shirley
7th August 2009, 08:26 AM
I have just downloaded a trial version of Lightroom.
I have had a very quick play with it but know that I am not making the most of the software. Does anybody know of any good links to sites with idiot proof guides or maybe any books which you have found helpful?
Thank you

oly_om
7th August 2009, 09:12 AM
I have just downloaded a trial version of Lightroom.
I have had a very quick play with it but know that I am not making the most of the software. Does anybody know of any good links to sites with idiot proof guides or maybe any books which you have found helpful?
Thank you

Shirley

There are some video casts on the adobe website which go through different sorts of operations - these might be a good first step. LR can appear to be very sloooow if you don't have things set-up quite right. When you import a new set of pictures, I would advise rendering 1:1 previews - this is initially slow (go and have a cup of tea), but subsequent editing is faster. LR is memory hungry - I have 4Gb of RAM on my PC, I would advise no less than 2Gb for any really serious stuff. Check you have the latest graphics drivers too - this can have a massive impact (as was seen when I upgraded a friend's laptop).

Andy

brob108
7th August 2009, 09:18 AM
Here you go Shirley

Martin Evening's book covers everything well: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Adobe-Photoshop-Lightroom-Book-Photographers/dp/0321555619/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1249636479&sr=8-3

and for a video (you have to pay for it but it's very thorough and entertaining):

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/videos/LR2.shtml

Jeff Schewe has a major input into Lightroom so he knows his onions.

Scott Kelby is worth checking out for Lightroom stuff too.

Stick with the software, it's well worth it and makes things a lot quicker than Photoshop.

theMusicMan
7th August 2009, 09:20 AM
Hi Shirley

Take a look through some of the informative posts on http://www.lightroomforums.net/ - it's a good resource for all things LR.

Also - do feel free to ask any questions you may have on here too as there are many experienced Lightroom users on e-group.

What is it you're after finding out about on LR in the first instance...? Maybe we can help...?

shirley
7th August 2009, 09:34 AM
Thanks everybody.
I have only just downloaded the trial version so I dont know what I dont know - if that makes sense :o.
My first thought is that I dont know how this is an improvement over my Bridge/Photoshop combination, especially as it appears I will still have to use Photoshop for some actions. If you know different please tell me.

theMusicMan
7th August 2009, 09:51 AM
If you right click on an image in LR Shirley, you should get an option to 'Edit in Photoshop CS'. Select that, then LR does the following;

1 - creates a copy of your image - located adjacent to the original
2 - sends this image to Photoshop and opens it
3 - when you save the image in Photoshop, it parses the amended file back to LR

You then have your original unedited image, with the amended Photoshop version - both in LR, right next to each other. You can do all that within LR.

Cool eh!

shirley
7th August 2009, 09:57 AM
If you right click on an image in LR Shirley, you should get an option to 'Edit in Photoshop CS'. Select that, then LR does the following;

1 - creates a copy of your image - located adjacent to the original
2 - sends this image to Photoshop and opens it
3 - when you save the image in Photoshop, it parses the amended file back to LR

You then have your original unedited image, with the amended Photoshop version - both in LR, right next to each other. You can do all that within LR.

Cool eh!

Hi John,
I have just tried this, when I right click and select Edit in CS I then get three options
1.Edit a copy with Lightroom adjustments
2.Edit a copy
3.Edit original.
Which should I choose?
Thanks

geirsan
7th August 2009, 10:31 AM
I have had tremendous help from lynda.com. You have to pay a fee, but it's really worth it. You don't get just Lightroom, but any app you need out there. It's the most valuable investement I've made in a long time.*chr

Ian
7th August 2009, 01:13 PM
Lightroom is very different to the traditional way of working. I found it hard to get my head around it for quite a while, but it eventually clicked and it is now my primary photo editing program.

It's also a mistake to simply regard it as a photo editing program. It's RAW processor, editing program, and image database or digital asset manager (DAM).

Key things to get used to:

Non-destructive editing. Whether the original is a RAW file or a JPEG, Lightroom makes no changes to the original image. All the changes you apply within Lightroom are remembered as a series of actions that are saved as an XMP sidecar file. That file changes, not the image file itself. Every time you come back to an edited image, the sidecar file actions are 'played' back and you see the image exactly as you left it last time you looked at it in Lightroom. If you went up a blind alley in your editing, you can go backwards through time and start again at any stage in the edit history.

Database driven. Lightroom has a powerful SQL database at its core. Every time you import an image in to Lightroom, you can apply key words, specify whether you want the image moved to a new location within Lightroom's image storage structure (of which there are many options) or to keep it where it is alread stored originally by you. Besides key words, you will be able to use image file names, folder names, plus image metadata (camera model, lens model, date taken, aperture used, shutter speed, ISO, etc.) to locate images using the database.

Importing and exporting. You can import images individually or in selected groups. You can also drage whole folders into Lightroom and it will swallow them all up, including sub-folders. One great aspect of Lightroom is that it will compare images lined up to be imported and, if you choose, reject any duplicates. When importing multiple images, you can enter key words that will then be assigned to all the images once imported. Later you can re-select any images and apply additional key words, as you wish. You can also use hierarchical key words, so using a one key word will also invoke additional sub key words. When exporting edited images, you can choose what size, file type, colour space, file name variation, etc. Select several images and they will all be exported to the same rules.

Applying edits to multiple images. Another fantastic advantage of Lightroom over the old way of doing things is to be able to edit one image, and then apply all or some of those edits to other images you have selected. That could be one other image or thousands. It's especially useful where you know the lighting and camera settings haven't changed during a session - in a studio, for example. You may have 100 images and you know that they all need to be sharpened by so much and the exposure reduced by x amount. What you do is perfect one image, then select the other similar images and then sync the parameters you want to apply to all the images. It's all done in the background, so you can immediately move on to the next task.

Editing tools. Adobe has concentrated on providing very accessible tools that enable you to adjust global parameters, like colour temperature, exposure, brightness, contrast, saturation, sharpness, noise reduction, etc. There are levels and curves tools, too. But one thing that Lightroom doesn't pretend to be is Photoshop. Although Lightroom does have some simple spot healing tools, a red eye reduction tool, a graduated filter tool, and a brush for applying adjustments to selected areas of an image, there is no Photoshop style layers-based editing facility. For maybe the majority of your images, Lightroom will be enough to knock them in to shape quickly and easily. But I still rely on Photoshop for major editing jobs on selected images, and if I want to play with more advanced special effects. For this reason, Lightroom has an option that lets you send the current image to Photoshop to be edited there, either with the Lightroom edits applied, or not.

Fundamentally, I now use Lightroom as my core image acquisition and management tool. I then use it for any basic knocking an image into shape editing. This usually ends up with me then exporting the image or images for web resolution and posting to the web, or for printing. A relatively small number will then be finished off in Photoshop. I also now depend heavily on Lightroom ass my asset manager, to find older images quickly and easily.

As you can see, I'm a big fan :)

Lightroom versus Adobe Bridge. Lightroom is a fully-fledged database driven system. Adobe Bridge is a media file viewer. Both have similar overlapping functionality, but are actually fundamentally very different and I regard them as being complementary.

Hope that helps!

Ian

HughofBardfield
7th August 2009, 03:39 PM
Hi Shirley

These free tutorials were for LR1.0 - but they go thru the basic principles.

http://www.whibalhost.com/_Tutorials/Photoshop_LR/01/

Useful shortcuts here:

http://www.lightroomqueen.com/lrqshortcuts.php

Lots of tips here:

http://www.lightroomkillertips.com/

Flickr Lightroom Group - almost any question you could want answered has probably been asked here...

http://www.flickr.com/groups/adobe_lightroom/

Group tips & downloads page: http://www.flickr.com/groups/adobe_lightroom/discuss/72157603590978170/

I've used Lightroom since the early public Beta in 2006. I find very little reason to use Photoshop these days, as LR does pretty much all I want, but if you do have Actions set up that you use, you'll still need it. It's great strength from my POV is as an organiser of images.

theMusicMan
7th August 2009, 04:29 PM
Hi John,
I have just tried this, when I right click and select Edit in CS I then get three options
1.Edit a copy with Lightroom adjustments
2.Edit a copy
3.Edit original.
Which should I choose?
Thanks
Hi Shirley - apologies, I have been out.

It's entirely up to you.

1 - Will create a copy within PS that will contain any edits you may already have applied to the original within LR
2 - Will open a copy of the original, with no edits applied
3 - Will open the original

Hope this helps.

shirley
7th August 2009, 05:36 PM
Thank you everybody.
OK I have another question. I suspect the answer has something to do with Ian's comment about thinking differently.
I have folders on my hard drive with my images saved. I have a particular folder for exhibition entries which is sub divided into each exhibition I enter, photographs are copied into each folder when I enter them for exhibition. As a consequence I sometimes have an image in several of these sub folders.
I am in the library module and I have created a new sub folder - how do I copy an existing image into that folder if it is already in another sub folder, I cannot find a copy and paste option in the library module?
I hope this is clear and thank you in advance for your help.

Adagio
7th August 2009, 06:29 PM
If the image is in the Lightroom database you can use the Library-->Export to put a copy in another folder. I hope that I have answered the right question :)

If you can put up with his inane sense of humour Scott Kelby's Lightroom 2 book for Digital Photographers is pretty good at explaining the workflow.

Ian
7th August 2009, 06:48 PM
Do you have to have multiple physical copies of the same image any more? Why not just have one and key word it so that you can locate it from whatever angle you anticipate. For example, you have a photo of a friend's dog, and it's one you have entered into a competition in June 2009.

I'd tag it with the keywords: <friend's name>, dog's name, competion, June, 2009.

If you want to create different experssions of the one original image, you can create virtual copies that will be treated as separate images in the catalogue, but only the one original needs to exist.

By the way, you can locate the original file very easily, simply by right-clicking the image in Lightroom and then selecting Show in Explorer.

Ian

shirley
7th August 2009, 07:29 PM
Yes definitely a different way of thinking.
I assume that this is something I start from this point, it feels like a big job to go through everything and tag.
I am not sure about right clicking - when I do that nothing happens.
Thank you so much for your help, it is much appreciated.

theMusicMan
7th August 2009, 09:05 PM
Tagging images is really worth it Shirley. You can do it on import too!

You don't really need to create multiple copies of images; you can use colour labels to mark images, or perhaps populate one of the many EXIF fields with some prescribed text and use a smart collection to identify those images that meet that criteria. You can also mark any selection of images with EXIF values with only a few mouse clicks. It really is very easy once you know how.

shenstone
7th August 2009, 10:12 PM
I quite liked Lightroom

But I have to admit to an almost rabid dislike of most other Adobe products... esp CS3 which I've still got and still use as an absolute last resort

So I had to give it up because I just don't want to get suckered into the round of upgrade pricing that they charge.

Hope you do better with it ... I found good alterntives to everything it can do ... They are out there and they are a fraction of the cost

Regards
Andy

OlyPaul
7th August 2009, 10:20 PM
Shirley I agree with everything Ian has said. Also Scott Kelby's book is very easy to follow and gets you through most of the basics easily.

No more need for endless duplicate files for everything, and wait untill you get into "virtual copies":)

donmcmahan
25th August 2009, 07:45 PM
since starting to use Lightroom i have never opened Bridge, and unless i was working on an image in Indesign or Illustrator i can't think of any reason to

Kiwi Paul
25th August 2009, 10:14 PM
The "collections" is an excellent and easy way to organise your photos too, the same photo can be in as many collections as you like but there only needs to be one copy of the photo.

Paul