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blu-by-u
21st July 2009, 03:16 AM
Got my E-620 and I am very unhappy with the Image Quality. It's noisy and hazy. In comparison to my E-330, it loose out by a large margin.

I have switched that Gradation to Normal. There is not much difference as I still get grains even at ISO100 and ISO200.

Let's share your settings.

Radar
20th January 2010, 10:53 AM
Scanning through old posts and responding a little late :

I've experienced the same as you but this is better after playing with all the settings. What made the biggest difference for me was the DPI-setting(?) I changed from Auto to 350 and the pictures is much improved. Gradation is also changed and Noise reduction is set to "off" Sharpness is set to +1 and now I hardly do any adjustments on PC.

snaarman
20th January 2010, 11:04 AM
I modified my E620 metering setting to over expose by 2/3 of a stop. Thus all the pictures come out ok or a little bright. I then lower the brightness in ACR and Photoshop to get the correct result. You can do this without clipping the highlights if you are careful.

However, if I underexpose a scene in the camera then lift the picture in Photoshop, I usually see some noise in shadows. (My opinion is that the E620 is slightly worse than the E510 in this).

All this applies to raw image mode, I don't have any experience in Jpeg out of the camera.

Pete

Ian
20th January 2010, 12:05 PM
I modified my E620 metering setting to over expose by 2/3 of a stop. Thus all the pictures come out ok or a little bright. I then lower the brightness in ACR and Photoshop to get the correct result. You can do this without clipping the highlights if you are careful.

However, if I underexpose a scene in the camera then lift the picture in Photoshop, I usually see some noise in shadows. (My opinion is that the E620 is slightly worse than the E510 in this).

All this applies to raw image mode, I don't have any experience in Jpeg out of the camera.

Pete

There is a school of thought that it's beneficial to have your histograms peaking to the right, and as lons as you haven't gone too far, highlights can be recovered with surprisingly good results. In other words, reducing the brightness is much better than brightening an original image.

Ian

StephenL
20th January 2010, 01:00 PM
That's the way I tend to work with my E-620 - underexpose by 1/3 of a stop as a rule, unless the subject dictates otherwise. No noticable problems with noise up to ISO 800. But you have to look at your photos realistically - what is noise to you might be attractive grain to me :D

There is a school of thought that it's beneficial to have your histograms peaking to the right, and as lons as you haven't gone too far, highlights can be recovered with surprisingly good results. In other words, reducing the brightness is much better than brightening an original image.

Ian

Ian
20th January 2010, 01:03 PM
That's the way I tend to work with my E-620 - underexpose by 1/3 of a stop as a rule, unless the subject dictates otherwise. No noticable problems with noise up to ISO 800. But you have to look at your photos realistically - what is noise to you might be attractive grain to me :D

Actually, I mean over-expose with care, not under-expose. The theory is that if you brighten an image you will generate noise. If you darken an image, you will suppress noise.

Ian

StephenL
20th January 2010, 01:21 PM
That's why I tend to underexpose according to the camera's metering. That way I find I don't need to do any brightness adjustments in post-processing, and the slight "natural" darkness in the image simply doesn't show (as much) noise.

If you darken an image, you will suppress noise.

Ian